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Ribeye vs. New York Strip

huskrthill

Crap
10 Year Member
I'd like to try it with a cast iron pan but the one I tried wasn't bad.
Good thought, I'll try to remember to bust out the cast iron next time.

OK, I'm lazy and don't want to Google it, what pray tell is a reverse sear?
Many people (and steak houses) will sear their steaks at high temps initially to get that crust on the outside, then move to lower heat to finish the job. The reverse sear starts at a lower heat, then finishes at a very high heat at the end. It allows the meat to have a more consistent doneness throughout, except for the very outside. I'm not yet convinced it makes a difference to me.

However, that's actually how I cook prime rib now. Traditionally it's been done at high heat at the beginning, then low temp thru the rest of the cook. Reversing that allows for a consistent pink medium rare throughout while still getting a great crust on the outside.
 

Squatchsker

Offseason Cancelled
10 Year Member
Luckily my wife likes her steak med rare. Coals while they still have little finger flames. 1 inch ribeye, 4 min, flip, 3 min., pull em. Rest for 5 to 8 minutes, devour.

Strips are good, but a well marbled ribeye is beautiful. We eat mostly tri tip steak, but when sale time says ribeye I jump on it.
 

NU_Alum

All American
2 Year Member
I did that recently on the charcoal grill with some ribeyes. Not sure it made that much difference, at least in my opinion.
What do you cook it at on low? Try 215 and pull it at an internal of 110-115. Let it rest, crank the heat to high and search for a free minutes each side, flip so it Cooks twice on each side. You should end up with almost no brown on the top/bottom.

If you salt and pepper them the night before in the fridge it helps draw out moisture and you get a better sear.

It's the only way I'll cook steaks at home now.
 

huskrthill

Crap
10 Year Member
What do you cook it at on low? Try 215 and pull it at an internal of 110-115. Let it rest, crank the heat to high and search for a free minutes each side, flip so it Cooks twice on each side. You should end up with almost no brown on the top/bottom.

If you salt and pepper them the night before in the fridge it helps draw out moisture and you get a better sear.

It's the only way I'll cook steaks at home now.
I probably need to practice. I don't cook steaks to a certain internal temp, just by feel. And I don't know the temp of the charcoal grill. One side is hot, the other side is indirect heat and cooler.
 

bugeater61

Kill All Humans
15 Year Member
Prime rib beats all.
Yes, this would be my choice as well, growing up there was a little restaurant called the El Rancho along highway 275 that had the best in the area. Later in life we had to make special trips over to the Pink Poodle in Cresent Ia. for their incredible prime rib.
But in context of the question, bone in ribeye to be sure
 

NU_Alum

All American
2 Year Member
I probably need to practice. I don't cook steaks to a certain internal temp, just by feel. And I don't know the temp of the charcoal grill. One side is hot, the other side is indirect heat and cooler.
Try the oven on the low setting. Grill at the end. Takes about 40 minutes when they're an inch thick
 

Warhorse

Husker Fan
10 Year Member
I will take the ribeye the majority of the time, but I'll be damned if the strip doesn't end up winning out sometimes. Just grilled up some strips, and they were incredible.

And it may be blasphemous to some, but I prefer boneless steaks. I hate having to put extra work into cutting around the bone. Same reason I don't ever eat crab legs... way too much work to get the food into my mouth.
I agree on the crab legs but not on the steaks. I think any kind of in-bone meat has better flavor.
 
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