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POLL 2: Will there be a 2020 college football season? Poll ends 4/12

What's your prediction on college football in the fall of 2020?

  • No college football at all

    Votes: 32 35.2%
  • College football with schedule as usual

    Votes: 30 33.0%
  • Condensed schedule, football as usual

    Votes: 14 15.4%
  • Schedule as usual, no fans

    Votes: 11 12.1%
  • Condensed schedule, no fans

    Votes: 4 4.4%

  • Total voters
    91

Porkchopexpress

Junior Varsity
5 Year Member
If college campuses are open, and students are in the classroom, in dorms and eating in the dining halls without super-crazy government restrictions, then football will be played in some capacity. There might not be fans, it might be a condensed schedule, and/or the season may not be completed, but games will be played. There's 10's of millions of dollars at stake that some schools need in order to operate.
 
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This virus has put things into perspective and priorities have been made more clear.

The precedent is set. No matter how many millions of dollars are lost, sports in general, are done for 2020. See NBA. Not looking to compare NBA money to college football money but if the NBA shut down its season and cancelled the playoffs in the early stages, I find it highly unlikely colleges will be participating in sports until this is well behind us. I will miss watching games on Saturday but it is also the right call.

You could say "play to an empty stadium" but players easily pass things to each other and can then spread it back on campus. There will be no 2020 season.
 
This virus has put things into perspective and priorities have been made more clear.

The precedent is set. No matter how many millions of dollars are lost, sports in general, are done for 2020. See NBA. Not looking to compare NBA money to college football money but if the NBA shut down its season and cancelled the playoffs in the early stages, I find it highly unlikely colleges will be participating in sports until this is well behind us. I will miss watching games on Saturday but it is also the right call.

You could say "play to an empty stadium" but players easily pass things to each other and can then spread it back on campus. There will be no 2020 season.
I highly doubt sports are done for 2020. Depending on what the antibody testing starts to tell us, it could open up soon. It may not start on time, but I'm pretty sure the NFL is going to try and play games this year as well. Too much money in it for something that isn't quite as scary as it started out to be.
 

lincoln84

Travel Squad
5 Year Member
I stuck with full season, no fans. The MLB plan to play in Arizona without fans could be a blueprint. There are a lot of dollars at stake with TV contracts. There will be significant financial pressure to find a way to keep those dollars flowing and folks will have grown weary of the restrictions before then. I'm guessing there will be regular testing of all players, coaches and staff. It will be interesting to see how MLB handles a positive test if they go through with playing in May as I think a positive test on a team could cause havoc.
The MLB thing is FAR from reality right now. I would love it to happen but there are no active talks around this even with the different municipalities involved. I think it's an "idea" that needs a lot of things to happen first. Even on the local news last night they said June is more likely than May IF it happens.
 
I highly doubt sports are done for 2020. Depending on what the antibody testing starts to tell us, it could open up soon. It may not start on time, but I'm pretty sure the NFL is going to try and play games this year as well. Too much money in it for something that isn't quite as scary as it started out to be.
Personally, I don't think it is AS scary as it has been made out to be in the media. I rarely believe what is put in front of my face by the media anyway... unless they tell me it is the Husker's year. Ha! I also do not believe the media will calm down any time soon either. This thing has created a captive audience and people are staying glued to the media right now.

I don't believe any chances will be taken. Truth is that it CAN be scary for a lot of people. Two doctors have said they think my 2 year old had it when we rushed her to the ER and she was nearly intubated. It was sitting next to her on the table ready to go. It was scary. She lost color, went limp, and it all happened very very fast. We are talking hours. Myself and two of my three children are considered elevated risk.

I hope I am wrong and I do not have to go a season without Husker football. I just do not see it. I typically side with the "there is too much money in it" but we have already clearly seen that the money in sports has not overcome the fear people have.
 
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lincoln84

Travel Squad
5 Year Member
I think the biggest problem is lack of testing. Most of us won't get this virus--but we also have no way to tell if healthy people are carrying it/spreading it. That is the problem. Until there is mass, fast testing---no sports.
 

lincoln84

Travel Squad
5 Year Member
Speaking of so much money being lost, would we be susceptible to law suits from parents of students and athletes if we resume too early?
There is so much in play right now. Lots of unknowns and that alone will probably cause the NCAA to err on the side of caution. Teams would also risk forfeiting games if someone on their team tested positive. What schools want to risk that? It’s just such a mess.
 

Middle-aged_Ball_Coach

Scout Team
2 Year Member
I've heard some talk of Congress discussing a sort of blanket immunity clause to prevent an avalanche of lawsuits, which you know there would be an army of lawyers eager to litigate. I think that there's a reasonable chance of something getting pressed through because there is so much money at stake for so many well connected institutions in so many areas of life. There would be strong support for that kind of legislation. The devil is always in the details, so it could be as good or bad as imaginable, but I'd expect something to come through both houses in a month or two.
 
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WestTexasHusker

Varsity
5 Year Member
I think the biggest problem is lack of testing. Most of us won't get this virus--but we also have no way to tell if healthy people are carrying it/spreading it. That is the problem. Until there is mass, fast testing---no sports.
I think you meant “most of us WILL get this virus”.

Most of us WON’T die or even get ill.
 

lincoln84

Travel Squad
5 Year Member
I think you meant “most of us WILL get this virus”.

Most of us WON’T die or even get ill.
Maybe most get it but never know they had it? I meant most will not have a version of this where you know you are very sick and/or need hospitalization. Not sure how long antibody tests can determine a past infection? But yeah, even with a 10% death rate, most of the US will not die.
 

Sleestak

Recruit
This is a virus. Influenza is a virus. The common cold is caused by a virus. There are so many viruses in the world. Influenza has a season, colds mostly have a season, and this probably will, too. Most of us have been exposed to the flu virus and countless others. Most of us will eventually also be exposed to this one, unless it's a really weird one and miraculously dies off or something. That's doubtful, of course. When we're exposed, most of us will be fine. Many may not ever know they were exposed. Some will get extremely sick, and some will die, unfortunately. Similar to influenza, I imagine. I do believe college football will be played this year in some capacity, and I voted as such in both polls. In fact, I think there will be few or no restrictions, but we shall see. Regardless, Go Big Red!
 

Plague of Crickets

Where am I?
2 Year Member
Marburg is a virus with a fatality rate up to 80%. Ebola is a virus with strains that have mortality rates of 50-70%. Smallpox is a virus that killed 300 million people in the 20th century, and far more than that in earlier centuries. COVID-19 is nothing like Marburg, or ebola, or smallpox, but let's not make a wholesale dismissal of viruses. Some are relatively benign, but some are among the deadliest pathogens on the planet.
 
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