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I need the expert opinions of Cafe members

GoRedBig

Travel Squad
10 Year Member
i agree with pops, brown sugar. I like to leave the rub on for at least 24 hours before. do you have one of those tubes to start the charcoal before you add it?
 

huskrthill

Crap
10 Year Member
i agree with pops, brown sugar. I like to leave the rub on for at least 24 hours before. do you have one of those tubes to start the charcoal before you add it?
Ok, I will try the brown sugar. And yes, I have a chimney starter, if that's what you're talking about. One of these?


I'm also using lump charcoal instead of regular briquettes, and I am going to use hickory wood.
 
Last edited:
D

Deleted member 328

Guest
Ok, I will try the brown sugar. And yes, I have a chimney starter, if that's what you're talking about. One of these?


I'm also using lump charcoal instead of regular briquettes, and I am going to use hickory wood.
Careful with the Hickory. Most guys use it when they get started, but it can tend to over flavor the meat with smoke canceling out any of the subtleties of the rub/mop/marinade which is where the real flavor should come from. The smoke shouldn't be the MAIN thing you taste, it should just be a hint of the overall end product. I personally never use hickory or mesquite. I prefer the pecan, cherry, apple, sugar maple type of woods.
 
D

Deleted member 328

Guest
Also, remember these words..... everything tastes better with rub. :D:D

I put my favorite rubs in just about everything I cook when it comes bbq time. Corn, taters, beans, sauce, green beans, I mean EVERYTHING. It all tastes better with rub. Right now I have prolly 30 different kinds for different types of foods. You cant ever have too much rub around.
 

Rabid Husker Fan

Scout Team
5 Year Member
why did you guys even start smoking in the first place??? honest question. (this is pertaining to smoking of tobacco not the smoking of meat)
I was 13 years old and basically started smoking out of rebellion, boredom and because all the "cool kids" were doing it:eek:. I ended up quitting by force for basic training but as soon as I got out to my Tech School I started up again. Then I started to chew tobacco to quit smoking :eek::banghead:, yeah real bright huh. So I was not only smoking but I was also chewing at the same time. But I finally kicked both habits about 8 years ago now. I don't ever get a craving for cigarettes but every now and then I do get a craving for a dip of chew but it only lasts a moment and know I will never start either habit again.
 
D

Deleted member 328

Guest
Also, make sure you have a good meat thermometer. Internal temps are the key. After the meat has reached 140 internal temp it physically cannot accept any more smoke flavor. All of the protiens that allow the smoke flavor to absorb into the meat have been set at 140 degrees. So don't worry about adding more wood or anything after that. Technically you can wrap it in foil and stick it in an oven at that point. But thats no fun.
 

huskrthill

Crap
10 Year Member
Careful with the Hickory. Most guys use it when they get started, but it can tend to over flavor the meat with smoke canceling out any of the subtleties of the rub/mop/marinade which is where the real flavor should come from. The smoke shouldn't be the MAIN thing you taste, it should just be a hint of the overall end product. I personally never use hickory or mesquite. I prefer the pecan, cherry, apple, sugar maple type of woods.
Yeah, I smoked some ribs and had that problem with the hickory - I was going to use less this time. My brother has some pecan, so maybe I'll stop by his place and steal a little bit.
 

Pops

I have squandered my resistance
10 Year Member
Careful with the Hickory. Most guys use it when they get started, but it can tend to over flavor the meat with smoke canceling out any of the subtleties of the rub/mop/marinade which is where the real flavor should come from. The smoke shouldn't be the MAIN thing you taste, it should just be a hint of the overall end product. I personally never use hickory or mesquite. I prefer the pecan, cherry, apple, sugar maple type of woods.
Oak for anytype of meat you can add the hickory taste in with the rub with a mixture of spices...OAK, OAK, OAK,
Apple for chicken and any type of fowl...


Cherry for fish
 

huskrthill

Crap
10 Year Member
Also, make sure you have a good meat thermometer. Internal temps are the key. After the meat has reached 140 internal temp it physically cannot accept any more smoke flavor. All of the protiens that allow the smoke flavor to absorb into the meat have been set at 140 degrees. So don't worry about adding more wood or anything after that. Technically you can wrap it in foil and stick it in an oven at that point. But thats no fun.
Thanks, Alton Brown. :D
 

Pops

I have squandered my resistance
10 Year Member
Also, make sure you have a good meat thermometer. Internal temps are the key. After the meat has reached 140 internal temp it physically cannot accept any more smoke flavor. All of the protiens that allow the smoke flavor to absorb into the meat have been set at 140 degrees. So don't worry about adding more wood or anything after that. Technically you can wrap it in foil and stick it in an oven at that point. But thats no fun.
and have at room temp before you put on the grill or smoker....
 
D

Deleted member 328

Guest
Ok I just looked at your recipe. Another thing.... if you get a flat, make sure it has 1/4 inch of fat on it or your brisket will turn out REALLY dry. You need the fat on there to help with the moisture of the meat. Some grocery stores cut all fat off the "Flat" and sell them that way. DO NOT BUY THOSE. Tell the butcher you need 1/4 fat left on the cut you want.
 

Pops

I have squandered my resistance
10 Year Member
Ok I just looked at your recipe. Another thing.... if you get a flat, make sure it has 1/4 inch of fat on it or your brisket will turn out REALLY dry. You need the fat on there to help with the moisture of the meat. Some grocery stores cut all fat off the "Flat" and sell them that way. DO NOT BUY THOSE. Tell the butcher you need 1/4 fat left on the cut you want.
and you want the fat side up so it moisturizes the meat as it cooks
 
D

Deleted member 328

Guest
and have at room temp before you put on the grill or smoker....
No way. If you want more smoke flavor you need to keep it refridgerated up until adding to the smoker. That way your smoke temp is 40-140 instead of only 70-140 or whatever room temp is.

Now, after you pull it OUT of the smoker you want it to sit for 20 min or so to allow all the juices to flow out through the meat again. THis is also pretty key.
 

huskrthill

Crap
10 Year Member
It has the fat, I will have that side up, and I read that I shouldn't let it sit at room temp for more than an hour.
 
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