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Bow Hunters

HuskerFaith

Recruit
Just a general question for this possible wannabe: how close do you have to be to get a good shot with a compound bow?
 

Yoda

Travel Squad
2 Year Member
Just a general question for this possible wannabe: how close do you have to be to get a good shot with a compound bow?
Generally, for stand/blind hunting with compounds, 25-30ish yards and inside that is what is suggested. But, that varies based on individual skill and the attitude of the animal (basically speaking whitetails here). For other critters and other styles the range is usually longer, again dependent on individual skill and the attitude of the animal. I’ve passed up closer shots on an animal to take a longer one a couple of minutes later at the same critter based on how it was acting when it was closer. There’s really not a hard and fast rule that applies to everyone every time IMO.

Late edit: the 25-30 doesn’t mean that it is ok for everyone to shoot at a critter at that distance. Some peeps have an effective range of 15 yards, some 50, and there are others that need to practice more yet before heading into the woods IMO.
 
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Elwood von Kiowa

Grad Assistant
5 Year Member
Just a general question for this possible wannabe: how close do you have to be to get a good shot with a compound bow?
I would modify @Yoda 's statement to add:

Get comfortable practicing at various ranges (just like you would with a rifle). Whatever your max range is shooting a target (accurately and repeatably), reduce that by maybe at least 20%. You want to be able to make an ethical shot.

And of course it depends on conditions, too (weather, wind). If you're going to hunt from a tree stand, do some target practice from the stand. Your mechanics will be different from just standing on the ground.

There are several online training courses for bow hunting, as well as hunter safety. Whether or not it's required where you are, I would recommend taking them. I thought I knew it all, but picked up some good info from the Georgia Hunter safety course. They have a bow hunting course as well, that I signed up for but didn't take yet.
 

HuskerFaith

Recruit
Generally, for stand/blind hunting with compounds, 25-30ish yards and inside that is what is suggested. But, that varies based on individual skill and the attitude of the animal (basically speaking whitetails here). For other critters and other styles the range is usually longer, again dependent on individual skill and the attitude of the animal. I’ve passed up closer shots on an animal to take a longer one a couple of minutes later at the same critter based on how it was acting when it was closer. There’s really not a hard and fast rule that applies to everyone every time IMO.

Late edit: the 25-30 doesn’t mean that it is ok for everyone to shoot at a critter at that distance. Some peeps have an effective range of 15 yards, some 50, and there are others that need to practice more yet before heading into the woods IMO.
Acting? Again total rookie here! Sorry I’m ignorant
 

HuSkaBob

Husker Geek
5 Year Member
I found a used compound bow on Craigslist in Lincoln a year or two ago for just under $200. It's a "dial a weight" model from 20-70#'s. It's a Hoyt, but it's not super nice. It's a great way to learn and I can turn up the weight as I get comfortable with it. I'm shooting much more barebow recurve at the moment, thinking about signing up for a competition when those happen again. My sight is an issue, so I'm not sure I'd ever be comfortable hunting without a "guide" to check me.
 

Deer&Ducks

Recruit
5 Year Member
I've been one of the damned for the last thirty years. I started in high school on my grandparents' farm and have hunted on some small pieces of land near home ever since. There's nothing better than being in the trees on a crisp October morning.

I've helped with some food plots in past years, but don't have anything currently. The farm I hunt a lot has a crick winding through it that floods every year and at least one of the fingers of land gets cut off from the combine, making a late-season food plot of sorts for me. Last year, I had a gorgeous little bean field that was completely cut off, but the deer didn't touch it until February. I guess that's why it's called "hunting", rather than "shooting".

I put out my trail cameras over corn and mineral just the other day. I'm hoping to get some idea of what deer might have stuck around. The doe population used to be nuts, so the bucks that were around in the Summer stayed put through the Fall and Winter, but the EHD that ripped through a while back really hit them hard. It gets better every year, so I'm anxious to see what's out there.
 

HuSkaBob

Husker Geek
5 Year Member
I'm getting markedly better with my barebow (3d walking tournament this week!). I am having some issues with my hunting bow however. I can't seem to lower the sight enough to get the lowest pin on the sight to center any further out than 30m. I can dial the draw weight up more... that's about all I can think to do other than getting a new sight. Ideas?

Another question: is a whisker biscuit really that bad? I hear from people on the range that you have to have a drop-away guide. I haven't used one, probably not good enough for it to make a difference.
 

Yoda

Travel Squad
2 Year Member
I'm getting markedly better with my barebow (3d walking tournament this week!). I am having some issues with my hunting bow however. I can't seem to lower the sight enough to get the lowest pin on the sight to center any further out than 30m. I can dial the draw weight up more... that's about all I can think to do other than getting a new sight. Ideas?

Another question: is a whisker biscuit really that bad? I hear from people on the range that you have to have a drop-away guide. I haven't used one, probably not good enough for it to make a difference.
Lots of potential ideas, but without seeing what everything looks like, hard to know where to begin. Assuming the rest height is correct in relation to the nock location on the string, the most common cause of this is too high of anchor point and/or the peep being too low in the string. But this assumes a few things.

The WB is a decent rest. Pretty good for beginners/novices because it eliminates worrying about the arrow falling off the rest and is pretty basic. If precision shooting at distance is desired (even more precision closer too) there are better options available. They simply do a better job of “guiding” an arrow IMO. But in our testing there’s not enough difference within 30 yards to matter with hunting conditions in mind. If your tryingto hit 30 or 60 Ax’s in a row, different story.
 

ksuhusker

In a tree somewhere
5 Year Member
I'm getting markedly better with my barebow (3d walking tournament this week!). I am having some issues with my hunting bow however. I can't seem to lower the sight enough to get the lowest pin on the sight to center any further out than 30m. I can dial the draw weight up more... that's about all I can think to do other than getting a new sight. Ideas?

Another question: is a whisker biscuit really that bad? I hear from people on the range that you have to have a drop-away guide. I haven't used one, probably not good enough for it to make a difference.
Most likely a peep sight height issue as Yoda said. Any decent archery shop could get you fixed up in a jiffy. Whisker biscuits are "ok" but not ideal for accuracy. Im using the new limb style drop away rest, but they can be pricey. I'd recommend getting your cams tuned, and paper tune your shots is a must. Doesn't take to long but improves your shot tremendously.
 
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