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2020 QB Commit Logan Smothers advances to state finals in 60 meter dash

Huskerthom

All Legend
5 Year Member
It’s an interesting thing to look at. I always look at a guy like Dusty Stamer, who was an unbelievable track guy in high school, then went to play football at USD and I believe was freshman of the year in that conference (if he wasn’t he was still an outstanding performer there). He transfers to Nebraska and ends up getting even faster, but Solich told him his speed just wasn’t translating on the field. Goes out for the track team and is running 10.1s but just couldn’t make it work at Nebraska despite getting faster than what he was up at USD where he dominated college football.

You then look at guys like Erwin Swiney, Eric Crouch, I believe even Randy Stella (always love throwing him in conversations as he was a LB who also did kick returns for us, awesome). Those guys ran track and weren’t elite, but their speed was elite on game days. Crouch could get up to speed so quick, when he made a decision to cut up field, defenses had a tough time closing the angle. Swiney struggled at Nebraska but was so gifted he still found a spot with Green Bay.

You then have cases like Stamer or Jeff Demps who was in the Olympics and an NFL coach told him to just stick with track.

Bottom line for me is I’d rather have a guy that’s running some fast track times at skill positions. Having track speed is never going to be a detriment. I’d rather have a lineman that is throwing the shot or disc or playing basketball before getting to college, competing and being well-rounded isn’t going to hurt. But there’s no one answer unfortunately to if it will translate.
I would say a lot depends on the offense/defense they are playing in as well. Stamer for example. He did not do well in our power game of the past. It may be a different story in HCSF offense. This offense uses speed to find creases in the defense and hitting people in stride. So he might fit better now then he would have then.
 

HuSkaBob

Husker Geek
5 Year Member
It’s an interesting thing to look at. I always look at a guy like Dusty Stamer, who was an unbelievable track guy in high school, then went to play football at USD and I believe was freshman of the year in that conference (if he wasn’t he was still an outstanding performer there). He transfers to Nebraska and ends up getting even faster, but Solich told him his speed just wasn’t translating on the field. Goes out for the track team and is running 10.1s but just couldn’t make it work at Nebraska despite getting faster than what he was up at USD where he dominated college football.

You then look at guys like Erwin Swiney, Eric Crouch, I believe even Randy Stella (always love throwing him in conversations as he was a LB who also did kick returns for us, awesome). Those guys ran track and weren’t elite, but their speed was elite on game days. Crouch could get up to speed so quick, when he made a decision to cut up field, defenses had a tough time closing the angle. Swiney struggled at Nebraska but was so gifted he still found a spot with Green Bay.

You then have cases like Stamer or Jeff Demps who was in the Olympics and an NFL coach told him to just stick with track.

Bottom line for me is I’d rather have a guy that’s running some fast track times at skill positions. Having track speed is never going to be a detriment. I’d rather have a lineman that is throwing the shot or disc or playing basketball before getting to college, competing and being well-rounded isn’t going to hurt. But there’s no one answer unfortunately to if it will translate.
Jamie Worden, anyone? Faster than Keith Jones on the track, but never translated into success on the field. Just another example. :)
 

One Man Jury

Red Shirt
5 Year Member
Bottom line for me is I’d rather have a guy that’s running some fast track times at skill positions. Having track speed is never going to be a detriment. I’d rather have a lineman that is throwing the shot or disc or playing basketball before getting to college, competing and being well-rounded isn’t going to hurt. But there’s no one answer unfortunately to if it will translate.
A football coach in town told me his rule of thumb was: “You can never be too strong, too fast, or too rich.”
 

South Omaha Husker

Red Shirt
5 Year Member
It’s an interesting thing to look at. I always look at a guy like Dusty Stamer, who was an unbelievable track guy in high school, then went to play football at USD and I believe was freshman of the year in that conference (if he wasn’t he was still an outstanding performer there). He transfers to Nebraska and ends up getting even faster, but Solich told him his speed just wasn’t translating on the field. Goes out for the track team and is running 10.1s but just couldn’t make it work at Nebraska despite getting faster than what he was up at USD where he dominated college football.

You then look at guys like Erwin Swiney, Eric Crouch, I believe even Randy Stella (always love throwing him in conversations as he was a LB who also did kick returns for us, awesome). Those guys ran track and weren’t elite, but their speed was elite on game days. Crouch could get up to speed so quick, when he made a decision to cut up field, defenses had a tough time closing the angle. Swiney struggled at Nebraska but was so gifted he still found a spot with Green Bay.

You then have cases like Stamer or Jeff Demps who was in the Olympics and an NFL coach told him to just stick with track.

Bottom line for me is I’d rather have a guy that’s running some fast track times at skill positions. Having track speed is never going to be a detriment. I’d rather have a lineman that is throwing the shot or disc or playing basketball before getting to college, competing and being well-rounded isn’t going to hurt. But there’s no one answer unfortunately to if it will translate.
My guy would be Banderas who had great track speed (won the all Class high hurdles, I think), but seemed like he was always a step slow to the outside.
 

ShortSideOption

All Big 10
10 Year Member
My guy would be Banderas who had great track speed (won the all Class high hurdles, I think), but seemed like he was always a step slow to the outside.
He's a really good example. Very good hurdler so you knew he had speed and athleticism, but just couldn't put it together on the lines. I like Josh, but he's a good example of being a workout warrior. Goes down to a camp runs some pretty impressive times, gets his fourth star. It's why there's a ton of highly ranked kids down south, they blow up their "combine" stats, but doesn't mean they are great football players. Josh was such a good athlete he even got a couple chances on an NFL roster. It was physicality for him in my opinion.
 
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