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Upland Bird Hunting

Redleg

Red Shirt
5 Year Member
Blood line is not, but yes that is where she was trained. He would like to breed her with one of their males at some point.
Very good looking dog and I bet is a firecracker in the field. I love watching shorthairs in the field. I went with a Pudelpointer. Not as big running in the field but their coat stands up better to waterfowling in the cold and ice and they are low shedding (bonus).
They're a bit more of a Swiss Army knife that may not be the best at any given task (upland or waterfowl) but they do both good enough for my needs and my girl has just a tremendous "off switch" in the house.
I'll probably add another dog in the next year or so and haven't completely decided on breed. Most likely be another PP, a German Wirehair, or Shorthair. I'm a fan of all sporting dogs and would have a wide mix of pointers and flushers/retrievers if I had the time to train and hunt them all.
 

ksuhusker

In a tree somewhere
10 Year Member
20220123_175647_compress45.jpg

Well, it was a more difficult hunt, very dry and warm. At 43 years old, we walked our butts off. Most pheasant were running, and the quail were tough to find. Overall it was good, and we worked for what reward we got. My legs are sore, forgot what it was like walking 20+ miles in a weekend. I would rate the hunt at a 4. The 1st weekend of January in the bitter cold was definitely better.
 

Sandhills Husker

Scout Team
5 Year Member
View attachment 76738
Well, it was a more difficult hunt, very dry and warm. At 43 years old, we walked our butts off. Most pheasant were running, and the quail were tough to find. Overall it was good, and we worked for what reward we got. My legs are sore, forgot what it was like walking 20+ miles in a weekend. I would rate the hunt at a 4. The 1st weekend of January in the bitter cold was definitely better.
43 years old! I have shoes older than that! :)
 

AzHusker

Big Red Fanatic
15 Year Member
Very good looking dog and I bet is a firecracker in the field. I love watching shorthairs in the field. I went with a Pudelpointer. Not as big running in the field but their coat stands up better to waterfowling in the cold and ice and they are low shedding (bonus).
They're a bit more of a Swiss Army knife that may not be the best at any given task (upland or waterfowl) but they do both good enough for my needs and my girl has just a tremendous "off switch" in the house.
I'll probably add another dog in the next year or so and haven't completely decided on breed. Most likely be another PP, a German Wirehair, or Shorthair. I'm a fan of all sporting dogs and would have a wide mix of pointers and flushers/retrievers if I had the time to train and hunt them all.
Hey @Redleg I know this post is old, but would you mind sharing where you got your PP? I've had my eye on them for awhile, and am trying to learn about some of the bloodlines. I've seen several clips of PP's at work, and I absolutely love that "snappy" point - the dog can be running along at almost full clip and BAM, scent cone entered, leg's at hard stop. I've also heard they are great at home which is very important to me too. I too am a fan of all sporting dogs - and would have kennels full if I could...
 

Redleg

Red Shirt
5 Year Member
Hey @Redleg I know this post is old, but would you mind sharing where you got your PP? I've had my eye on them for awhile, and am trying to learn about some of the bloodlines. I've seen several clips of PP's at work, and I absolutely love that "snappy" point - the dog can be running along at almost full clip and BAM, scent cone entered, leg's at hard stop. I've also heard they are great at home which is very important to me too. I too am a fan of all sporting dogs - and would have kennels full if I could...
No problem, I could talk PPs all day. My current PP is my first so I have a couple lessons learned that I wish I would have paid more attention to going in. I won't name the breeder/kennel because I wouldn't recommend him but don't want to "trash" him publicly either because I got a great dog with lots of drive. Mostly, his communication wasn't great and he was from the east part of the country and they don't hunt upland birds in big open areas. She doesn't cover as much ground as I'd like, but does adjust to the cover so not exactly a boot licker, either.

Next time I'll go with a breeder who is known for producing bigger running dogs. Bottom line- identify what hunting you do and make sure the breeder is hunting and producing dogs that you want. If you waterfowl, make sure they hunt and produce duck dogs. Coat is also important to me for protection / maintenance and I kinda missed the first time around. My girl is a bit woolly and I like the look cause she looks like a damn muppet and makes me laugh but her coat is softer and will gather burrs so its higher maintenance. Next time I'll go for a tighter coat.

Read on if you have lots of time to kill- sorry it's a bit looooong.

If Bob Farris from Cedarwoods Kennels in Idaho is still breeding when I'm ready to get on a wait list, he'll be my first call. He hunts both waterfowl and chukar and produces big running dogs that love the water. He's a legend in the PP world and maybe second only to Bodo Winterhelle who brought the breed to the US. Bob was a guest on "The Hunting Dog Podcast" and named a few other breeders he thinks are producing great dogs so you couldn't go wrong with any of them if you search old episodes of that podcast. I just can't remember off the top of my head who all he named, but believe most around Idaho and Oregon who breed Cedarwoods lines are pretty tied in with him.
I have met Jack Tracy from Cross Timber Gundogs (Oklahoma) and his base female is absolutely amazing. Her duck search is off the charts. I believe she was out of Ripsnorter Kennels in Ohio and they have a great reputation.

The good news is, most PP breeders meet or exceed the testing requirements so you can be sure you are getting a very solid hunting dog. There are no show lines and most breeders won't sell to non-hunters. The bad is that sometimes there can be a bit of a wait list depending upon what breeder you select.

I know there is a breeder in AZ, but I just don't know anything about him (or his dogs) and don't see him listed with No. American Pudelpointer Alliance (NAPPA), https://www.pudelpointer-alliance.com/, or No. American Pudelpointer Society (NAPS), https://pudelpointersociety.org/. I personally, would not buy from a breeder who is not a member of one of those breeder alliances who are committed to certain breeding standards. There are some good breeders who are not members so if you have a question about one in particular you can shoot me the name and I'll tell you what I know of their reputation. I do probably know about the bloodlines of most breeders and can look them up in the NAVHDA database. The PP community is still pretty small and I've spend countless hours looking at bloodlines and pouring over NAVHDA test scores.

Good luck and let me know if you have specific questions I haven't answered.
 

Redleg

Red Shirt
5 Year Member
Hey @Redleg I know this post is old, but would you mind sharing where you got your PP? I've had my eye on them for awhile, and am trying to learn about some of the bloodlines. I've seen several clips of PP's at work, and I absolutely love that "snappy" point - the dog can be running along at almost full clip and BAM, scent cone entered, leg's at hard stop. I've also heard they are great at home which is very important to me too. I too am a fan of all sporting dogs - and would have kennels full if I could...
Here is my girls pedigree.


Pepper.jpg.png
 
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AzHusker

Big Red Fanatic
15 Year Member
No problem, I could talk PPs all day. My current PP is my first so I have a couple lessons learned that I wish I would have paid more attention to going in. I won't name the breeder/kennel because I wouldn't recommend him but don't want to "trash" him publicly either because I got a great dog with lots of drive. Mostly, his communication wasn't great and he was from the east part of the country and they don't hunt upland birds in big open areas. She doesn't cover as much ground as I'd like, but does adjust to the cover so not exactly a boot licker, either.

Next time I'll go with a breeder who is known for producing bigger running dogs. Bottom line- identify what hunting you do and make sure the breeder is hunting and producing dogs that you want. If you waterfowl, make sure they hunt and produce duck dogs. Coat is also important to me for protection / maintenance and I kinda missed the first time around. My girl is a bit woolly and I like the look cause she looks like a damn muppet and makes me laugh but her coat is softer and will gather burrs so its higher maintenance. Next time I'll go for a tighter coat.

Read on if you have lots of time to kill- sorry it's a bit looooong.

If Bob Farris from Cedarwoods Kennels in Idaho is still breeding when I'm ready to get on a wait list, he'll be my first call. He hunts both waterfowl and chukar and produces big running dogs that love the water. He's a legend in the PP world and maybe second only to Bodo Winterhelle who brought the breed to the US. Bob was a guest on "The Hunting Dog Podcast" and named a few other breeders he thinks are producing great dogs so you couldn't go wrong with any of them if you search old episodes of that podcast. I just can't remember off the top of my head who all he named, but believe most around Idaho and Oregon who breed Cedarwoods lines are pretty tied in with him.
I have met Jack Tracy from Cross Timber Gundogs (Oklahoma) and his base female is absolutely amazing. Her duck search is off the charts. I believe she was out of Ripsnorter Kennels in Ohio and they have a great reputation.

The good news is, most PP breeders meet or exceed the testing requirements so you can be sure you are getting a very solid hunting dog. There are no show lines and most breeders won't sell to non-hunters. The bad is that sometimes there can be a bit of a wait list depending upon what breeder you select.

I know there is a breeder in AZ, but I just don't know anything about him (or his dogs) and don't see him listed with No. American Pudelpointer Alliance (NAPPA), https://www.pudelpointer-alliance.com/, or No. American Pudelpointer Society (NAPS), https://pudelpointersociety.org/. I personally, would not buy from a breeder who is not a member of one of those breeder alliances who are committed to certain breeding standards. There are some good breeders who are not members so if you have a question about one in particular you can shoot me the name and I'll tell you what I know of their reputation. I do probably know about the bloodlines of most breeders and can look them up in the NAVHDA database. The PP community is still pretty small and I've spend countless hours looking at bloodlines and pouring over NAVHDA test scores.

Good luck and let me know if you have specific questions I haven't answered.
Oh, man, thank you so much for all of the information. Your recommendation of Bob Farris or someone from the Breeders Alliance is spot on - Over the last few years, I've been on his website so many times reading about his adventures and enjoying all of the pics of the fantastic dogs. I remember for a time, a Cedarwoods dog was the "tee retriever" after kickoffs of Boise State back when they were a power!


Besides all of the outstanding working skills of the breed, I was really captured when Bob described how the neighbor kids frequently asked if his main breeding bitch could spend the night at their house on the weekends. He said the kids loved her so much, and her temperament was so cooperative, the parents were always happy to have the dog for a "sleepover." :)

I'm just hoping I can get a dog aboard before I get too damned old - turn 65 this year, and have too many things going on right now to add a pup. (Both parents passed recently, and we have a house in Nebraska to empty out and decide to rent or sell, estate business, etc.). But that won't last forever. One of our future plans is to possibly locate and purchase a home in Spokane WA - we have some relatives there, one of whom is a 10 year old nephew whose dad passed away from cancer a couple years agoe, and who needs someone to take him hunting and fishing. Like to join the local NAVHDA group and possibly find some training partners or a trainer locally also. So I was thinking of parlaying the move with the purchase of a pup that would be good for chasing some birds up in that area, as well as retrieving ducks and geese from any of the numerous creeks, rivers or lakes around. Renting a house or a room in pheasant country in South Dakota from September - December has been a dream of mine also. Sadly, after a 20 + year drought, there are hardly any quail left in the desert in Az. And I'm not sure I'd even want to subject a dog with any kind of coat to the 100+ days over 110 degrees some summers here of late.

Your pup has a bunch of Cedarwoods blood in her, and several VC's! I'm sure she is fantastic - but it's also interesting that it's hard to even know what you want in a dog until you get one and work with it for a few years. I grew up with labs - we had a lease of about a mile of the Platte River near Bayard, NE for several years when I was in high school at Scottsbluff, and our best lab literally retrieved thousands from the river, sometimes with huge chunks of ice floating in it. After moving to AZ in 1980, I found desert quail hunting here, and there were few trips when we didn't get limits of 15 each. I bought and trained a Brittany pup from a backyard breeders - her genes actually allowed her to be a really good dog.

I could go on and on, too, but I'll spare you! :) Thank you so much for your very informative response - I may shoot you a message here and there when I have a question that comes to mind. Meanwhile, I have a Facebook account primarily to see pics of dogs - there are a couple of groups of working pudelpointers - one is international - and I really, really enjoy some of the pics and videos of the dogs. It's unbelievable watching some of those young dogs with search patterns developing at 6-8 months, and rock solid points. The dogs just seem so damned happy, too, to be out doing what they love.

Thanks again, and GO BIG RED! :)
 
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Redleg

Red Shirt
5 Year Member
Oh, man, thank you so much for all of the information. Your recommendation of Bob Farris or someone from the Breeders Alliance is spot on - Over the last few years, I've been on his website so many times reading about his adventures and enjoying all of the pics of the fantastic dogs. I remember for a time, a Cedarwoods dog was the "tee retriever" after kickoffs of Boise State back when they were a power!


Besides all of the outstanding working skills of the breed, I was really captured when Bob described how the neighbor kids frequently asked if his main breeding bitch could spend the night at their house on the weekends. He said the kids loved her so much, and her temperament was so cooperative, the parents were always happy to have the dog for a "sleepover." :)

I'm just hoping I can get a dog aboard before I get too damned old - turn 65 this year, and have too many things going on right now to add a pup. (Both parents passed recently, and we have a house in Nebraska to empty out and decide to rent or sell, estate business, etc.). But that won't last forever. One of our future plans is to possibly locate and purchase a home in Spokane WA - we have some relatives there, one of whom is a 10 year old nephew whose dad passed away from cancer a couple years agoe, and who needs someone to take him hunting and fishing. Like to join the local NAVHDA group and possibly find some training partners or a trainer locally also. So I was thinking of parlaying the move with the purchase of a pup that would be good for chasing some birds up in that area, as well as retrieving ducks and geese from any of the numerous creeks, rivers or lakes around. Renting a house or a room in pheasant country in South Dakota from September - December has been a dream of mine also. Sadly, after a 20 + year drought, there are hardly any quail left in the desert in Az. And I'm not sure I'd even want to subject a dog with any kind of coat to the 100+ days over 110 degrees some summers here of late.

Your pup has a bunch of Cedarwoods blood in her, and several VC's! I'm sure she is fantastic - but it's also interesting that it's hard to even know what you want in a dog until you get one and work with it for a few years. I grew up with labs - we had a lease of about a mile of the Platte River near Bayard, NE for several years when I was in high school at Scottsbluff, and our best lab literally retrieved thousands from the river, sometimes with huge chunks of ice floating in it. After moving to AZ in 1980, I found desert quail hunting here, and there were few trips when we didn't get limits of 15 each. I bought and trained a Brittany pup from a backyard breeders - her genes actually allowed her to be a really good dog.

I could go on and on, too, but I'll spare you! :) Thank you so much for your very informative response - I may shoot you a message here and there when I have a question that comes to mind. Meanwhile, I have a Facebook account primarily to see pics of dogs - there are a couple of groups of working pudelpointers - one is international - and I really, really enjoy some of the pics and videos of the dogs. It's unbelievable watching some of those young dogs with search patterns developing at 6-8 months, and rock solid points. The dogs just seem so damned happy, too, to be out doing what they love.

Thanks again, and GO BIG RED! :)
My pleasure. I loved hearing Bob tell about how nervous he was the first time his dog retrieved the tee in a live game situation. Man, if you go to Spokane, you'll be "near" some of the best PP breeders around. Like I said, Bob would be my first call, but I would jump at a dog from Hard Trigger Gundogs, High Life Gundogs, Prairie Trout PPs, or Evergreen Gundogs. All producing great dogs with Cedarwoods lines and they all hunt and produce waterfowl and upland dogs. Some breeders point to their dogs water scores in the NA test but really don't hunt waterfowl. I trust all those breeders above because they all hunt both and prove their dogs in NAVHDA tests against base standards.

My boys were in grade school when I was researching my hunting dog and we always had neighborhood kids in and out of the house so I wanted a dog that had about 0.0% chance of being "sharp" with young boys running around yelling and playing. Add in that it must point in the upland, retrieve waterfowl, and be a low shedder, and I just felt I couldn't go wrong with a Pudelpointer. She's a house dog many more days a year than a hunter and I just love her personality. She goes from couch potato to intense killer in about 3 seconds if she sees me get the gun.

Her first year of duck hunting I was going to a buddy's farm pond with no cover that was fairly small and shallow so he recommended I not bring her cause it would be too hard to hide her. She saw me leave with my hunting gear about 4:30am and she proceeded to pitch a fit for 2hrs in the house- barking, yelling, pacing, and whining. Needless to say, when I got home I caught holy hell from my wife who told me I would NEVER AGAIN leave the dog behind when I went hunting. The dog wasn't too happy with me, either!

They aren't the be all end all dogs, but I do think they work out great for what I was/am looking for in a hunting dog/ companion, and I think would be perfect for you based on your description above. With a PP at your side, you'll make a lifelong hunter out of that boy. Heck, maybe even a future PP owner or breeder!
 

AzHusker

Big Red Fanatic
15 Year Member
Oh, that story of leaving your dog at home and her throwing a fit is PRICELESS :Lol:. Thanks so much for tossing out the “Cedarwoods affiliated” kennels. Bob is leaving quite a legacy of great gun dogs that are decent citizens, too. Being semi-retired now,I have a dog around me nearly 24/7. The dog’s with me running in to Home Depot, stopping for a coffee, wherever. That partnership is just really important to me. Actually the main reason I want to get back into hunting again is then I’ll need a dog to share it with. Oh, and shed (antler) hunting - that’s a spring time activity that I enjoy, another excuse to be out in nature.

Thank you again for being so generous with all things PP!!
 

huskerman1

Scout Team
10 Year Member
43 years old! I have shoes older than that! :)
Me too. At 43, just wind me up and get out of the way. Now, at 75, I do more blocking and pay more attention to my lab's work.

Always preferred labs over long-haired breeds and shorthairs; long hairs collect burrs in their paws and shorthairs don't stand up to sub 0 temps (neither do I anymore).
 

2nd and 3

Hey Mickey
2 Year Member
Kind of the same subject here. I left my trail cams out through the winter and finally got them in May. Had some time to finally go through the sd cards. Nothing crazy as far as deer pics but had some pleasant surprise pics. One camera was on a corner post over looking a creek bottom. Had a bunch of birds show up late December into February. After closer examination they were partridge. Most of them were Hungarian but did have some Chukars as well. Have hunted on this farm for almost 15 years and never seen them before. Hoping they will stick around as there isn't a lot of pressure out there other than me. Gives me something to look forward to this fall.
 
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