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Top 50 OC of 2021!

NorthwoodHusker

All Legend
i agree with several points you make....but, are we in the market of developing QB for the NFL or winning college football games? my goal is not to see how well we can develop a QB, but to win games. in regards to the misinformation above, the play starts with the success of the offensive line, this is not 7 on 7 summer league.

mark whipple has been involved with (ONE) 10 win season in college football. that was last year with pickett putting up big numbers. the 2 prior years with pickett at the helm, the panthers were 1 & 2 games above .500. and this is with the best QB whipple has ever had in college. contrary to the common thought around here, nebraska was ranked HIGHER in points per game by a wide margin in 2019 NU-63 Pitt-106 and while pitt outranked NU in 2020, they still were a dismal 78 nationally. the third year in the system with pickett, the jumped to last seasons ranking of 5 (?)

my last point, i don't want to throw away 2 season or more of developing a QB and have virtually what we have now to reach 10 wins...(remember nebraska's offense was better by a wide margin in 2019 in a better conference top to bottom) perhaps we can get 1 great QB after another in lincoln and have a chance that everything falls into place for a 10+ win season every 3 years, but zac taylor or maybe joe ganz was the last time we had a generally agreed upon QB. they don't come easy. wisconsin, iowa, minnesota, michigan, ohio state, alabama, georgia... youy name it, the consistently good teams run the ball first regardless if they are big good or sec good, formula is the same. run the ball, be good year to year and be great when things fall into place with great QB. if Whipple can do that, im all in...
So, you're not agreeing with creating a winning scheme by putting players in positions to win, but instead you think I'm saying we should wait for QB success/development first?
I'm saying it all goes hand in hand, as the coaches learns about our players, our players learn to play the plays better.
This includes the O line and the QB.
Individual growth varies, but as for O line, its that and cohesiveness, while consistency is honed in.
I didnt see that happening in our O line, and saw what I'll call tunnel vision as to run/pass game concentration.
Because 2years ago we honed in on short passing game where AM set records for comp %, the OC flipped and went long ball last year.

To me neither approach on its own is not enough to put players in winning positions if the defenses know where they'll be.
I dont see none of this in Whipple, and cant for the life of me they couldnt get the O line to gel, so new approaches are needed, and I think Whipple, Raiola and MJ will bring a whole new mindset, a deeper understanding of how to use the talent the players have and will be able to put them in better positions to win.
All the while individual growth, be it QB or O lineman will continue
 
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Hville

Travel Squad
5 Year Member
They also ranked outside the top 40 in recruiting in 2018, 2019, and 2020. This last year was their first one within the top 40, so I think that has something to do with it. I think he can do much more with the talent we have than he could his first couple seasons at Pitt
well based on that…..we were playing a lot of teams that had defenses with recruiting classes a lot higher than Pitt was playing against.
 

TnHusker87

Mayor of Shinola
2 Year Member
One random observation, NU played 4 on this list & none of the four named OU. Would not have expected that outcome.
 

Hotlanta Husker

Junior Varsity
5 Year Member
FWIW, when Whipple coached at UMass, they were FCS.

I think most believe Whipple is a capable OC. My question is can he turn our offense around quick enough? Pitt's offense was mediocre to poor for Whipple's first two seasons, then they exploded in year three.
That is not accurate HWM... they moved to FBS in 2012. He went back and coached there 2014 to 2018... 2 of those years their offense was in the 40s... with basically FCS or lowest tier FBS talent...
 

Bugeater45

Scout Team
15 Year Member
Who was calling the plays that couldn’t get us in the end zone?
Who was executing the plays that couldn't get us in the end zone?

I am not saying AM will not have a good season at KSU, I just don't believe his "slow blinker/decision-making" issues are suddenly resolved by taking his ball and moving 130 miles south...
 

HuskerNash

Junior Varsity
2 Year Member
Who was executing the plays that couldn't get us in the end zone?

I am not saying AM will not have a good season at KSU, I just don't believe his "slow blinker/decision-making" issues are suddenly resolved by taking his ball and moving 130 miles south...
Wasn’t referring to AM’s role but can see where you came to that conclusion. I was responding to a poster who faulted the last two OC’s for not being able to get us in the end zone. In my world that fault should be laid at the feet of the guy actually calling the offense-see Scott Frost. To me it’s just scapegoating others for the head man’s failures.
 

Bugeater45

Scout Team
15 Year Member
Wasn’t referring to AM’s role but can see where you came to that conclusion. I was responding to a poster who faulted the last two OC’s for not being able to get us in the end zone. In my world that fault should be laid at the feet of the guy actually calling the offense-see Scott Frost. To me it’s just scapegoating others for the head man’s failures.
I understand. That is the same Scott Frost who called plays for a UCF team that went 13-0 in 2017 and he was the unanimous choice for National Coach of the Year? I am not saying Scott doesn't have responsibility here, but unless he took a shot upside the head between his time at UCF and 2018, making him lose his play-calling ability, or it might have a lot to do with the signal caller over the past four years...

Again, best of luck to AM in Manhattan. He is a great young man and was a wonderful personal representative of our program. I just don't think in his fifth year of starting, everything that has dogged him for the last four seasons suddenly goes away and he becomes a legit Heisman Trophy candidate in year five. I will be the first to admit if I am wrong if he does.
 
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HuskerNash

Junior Varsity
2 Year Member
I understand. That is the same Scott Frost who called plays for a UCF team that went 13-0 in 2017 and he was the unanimous choice for National Coach of the Year? I am not saying Scott doesn't have responsibility here, but unless he took a shot upside the head between his time at UCF and 2018, making him lose his play-calling ability, or it might have a lot to do with the signal caller over the past four years...

Again, best of luck to AM in Manhattan. He is a great young man and was a wonderful personal representative of our program. I just don't think in his fifth year of starting, everything that has dogged him for the last four seasons suddenly goes away and he becomes a legit Heisman Trophy candidate in year five. I will be the first to admit if I am wrong if he does.
I am not a fan of UCF nor do I care what he did at UCF. I care what he does at my alma mater. If it matters so and success should translate to the Big 10, why all of a sudden is his entire offensive staff but one now gone? My guess is that they could not duplicate the success they had in the AAC. I would suggest our head coach is having the same problems. I've clarified my position and I still don't know what it has to do with AM unless you are trying to make the QB and the assistants the scapegoats for 15-29. Since you want to keep on-how in the world can you blame an offensive coordinator for lack of scoring sucess when the HEAD COACH is the one calling the plays??
 
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