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Texas A&M looking to leave the SEC for the B1G?

I wouldn't be surprised if there's some eventual rearrangement between the SEC and B1G get to equal numbers and (hopefully) restore some geographical sense while still facilitating the slate of national games that derive viewership.
I can foresee an NFL layout if the conferences come together. You could maintain conference allegiances (like the NFC/AFC) with the B1G and SEC. Split them into divisions by geographic area. Play most of your conference, plus some interconference play. Playoff in each conference would lead to the top teams facing off for ultimate title.
 
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First off, I don't think this will happen. It might not even be relevant in five years. Now that there is essentially a power 2, the transition to a model that resembles AFC and NFC under the NFL banner might make being in the B1G vs SEC less of an issue.

Having said that, I lived in College Station for six years. I wouldn't underestimate the desire to live in a different neighborhood than Texas. Lots of politics in Texas and A&M has frequently been the target of UT's politcal maneuvering on issues far beyond athletics. I wouldn't be surprised if the majority of Aggies favored being in a different conference than Texas.

I still think Texas and OU are in for a rude awakening. I know Texas made the playoff. They also had a home overtime win over K-State and close wins against TCU and Houston teams that were pretty darn average. They'll have to show up every week instead of getting up for two or three games a year, which will be an adjustment. It's one I hope they make poorly. I also think Texas is arrogant enough to think they can run over the other schools in the SEC like they did the SWC and Big 12. I don't that will work out the same way in their new league.
This is something people underestimate, though. Texas was a dictator within the Big 12. It is why Nebraska was so eager to leave, and I'm sure why A&M was ready to get out. Texas might try to walk into the SEC and start barking out orders, but I think they'll quickly realize they don't have the upper hand anymore. The Big 12 "needed" Texas. The SEC does not. Yes, Texas makes the SEC stronger, but the SEC would still be at the top, regardless of where Texas exists.

The in-state political issues are going to exist regardless of what conference these schools are in. They are both public universities in the state of Texas, being in the SEC or B1G doesn't change that. A&M will remain under UT's thumb to a certain extent for that fact alone.

My brother-in law's family are all Aggies. I know they would rather not have to deal with Texas; but again, there is a big difference between not wanting to deal with someone and completely uprooting yourself to avoid dealing with them.
 
The Big 12 is still a low first tier conference. Their hope should be that they can outlast the ACC, and maybe collect on some of their scraps when they implode. Grabbing some of the PAC teams helped bolster them a bit, since their recent acquisitions prior to that had been mostly AAC teams.

There is a a large gap between the SEC/B1G and everyone else. The hope for Big 12/ACC teams at this point is that they have enough value to get included into this next iteration of college sports. At some point, the NCAA will no longer be over the top Power schools and they'll go off on their own. You want to position yourself in a spot to be apart of that group.

A&M is already firmly in that group. Moving back to the Big 12 would put that spot in some jeopardy.

Texas isn't going to run the SEC in the same way they ran the Big 12. Schools like Bama, Florida, Georgia, LSU, won't let that happen. I expect the dynamic to be a culture shock for them, and it to be less of a hassle for A&M.
The B12 and ACC will end up as the best of the rest and in their own league. Every major tv draw is either in the P2 conferences or will be shortly with the Clemson/UNC/FSU/ND moves.

I'd love to see it all blown up and restarted with football schools in one league, and all other sports in other leagues. I don't need Rutgers in my football when schools like KSU would be way better IMO.
 
The B12 and ACC will end up as the best of the rest and in their own league. Every major tv draw is either in the P2 conferences or will be shortly with the Clemson/UNC/FSU/ND moves.

I'd love to see it all blown up and restarted with football schools in one league, and all other sports in other leagues. I don't need Rutgers in my football when schools like KSU would be way better IMO.
I think you could very easily condense things down into about 40 or so teams that truly care about football at the highest level. Schools like Rutgers, Indiana, Maryland, Vanderbilt, etc. don't belong on the same tier as Alabama, LSU, Ohio State, etc. There are a number of B1G/SEC teams I'd like see removed in favor of some of the ACC/Big XII teams.

I don't know what the magic number is or how long it will take, but at some point we'll see it get broken off into just the "top programs".
 



One of the distinctions between NCAA and NFL is in regional rivalries.

In the NFL, same-city or in-state teams are almost always split between the NFC and AFC.
NFCAFC
RamsChargers
49ersRaiders
GiantsJets
CowboysTexans
EaglesSteelers
BuccaneersJags / Dolphins

In NCAAF, you have a lot more instances of teams sharing conferences. Washington-WSU, Oregon-OSU, UCLA-USC, Stanford-Cal, Arizona-ASU, Texas-A&M, Oklahoma-OSU, Kansas-KSU, Michigan-MSU, Alabama-Auburn, Ole Miss-State, Tenn-Vandy, UNC-Duke-NCST-Wake, FSU-Miami

There are certainly notable exceptions (UGA-GT, Iowa-ISU) but in general, college tends to prioritize geographical similarity. It's much closer to the NBA (East-vs-West) in that regard instead of the NFL/MLB where both leagues span the whole country.

It'll be interesting to see which route the new B1G/SEC goes. I can see cases for both. The traditionalist in me likes the idea of seeing a 3-way divisional battle between Gators, Noles, and Canes every year. That's cool. That screams CFB to me, even if it means mixing up the ACC/SEC. Or putting together some MD/PA/VA division that includes Pitt, PSU, Maryland, WVU, UVA and VT. That's interesting and "feels" like CFB.

But, on the other hand, I like the idea of the two major players having a national footprint. Maybe Texas A&M grabs TCU and runs to the Big Ten? Or maybe the SEC decides they don't want to be confined to one corner of the country and makes a play for Arizona, ASU, Cal and Stanford? Different? Sure. But kind of cool in a new sort of way.

I'm just excited to see where it all goes.
 
I think you could very easily condense things down into about 40 or so teams that truly care about football at the highest level. Schools like Rutgers, Indiana, Maryland, Vanderbilt, etc. don't belong on the same tier as Alabama, LSU, Ohio State, etc. There are a number of B1G/SEC teams I'd like see removed in favor of some of the ACC/Big XII teams.

I don't know what the magic number is or how long it will take, but at some point we'll see it get broken off into just the "top programs".
For what it's worth these are the top 40 schools in football attendance (based on 5 year average):
  1. Michigan
  2. Penn State
  3. Ohio State
  4. Alabama
  5. Texas A&M
  6. LSU
  7. Texas
  8. Georgia
  9. Tennessee
  10. Nebraska
  11. Auburn
  12. Florida
  13. Oklahoma
  14. Clemson
  15. Notre Dame
  16. Wisconsin
  17. South Carolina
  18. Michigan State
  19. Iowa
  20. Washington
  21. Florida State
  22. Arkansas
  23. USC
  24. Virginia Tech
  25. Iowa State
  26. BYU
  27. Ole Miss
  28. Kentucky
  29. NC State
  30. Miss State
  31. Texas Tech
  32. Oklahoma State
  33. Miami
  34. West Virginia
  35. Oregon
  36. Purdue
  37. Missouri
  38. Kansas State
  39. Utah
  40. North Carolina
Current B1G/SEC left out: UCLA (42nd), Indiana (47th), Minnesota (48th), Rutgers (54th), Illinois (56th), Maryland (59th), Northwestern (62nd), Vanderbilt (77th)
 
One of the distinctions between NCAA and NFL is in regional rivalries.

In the NFL, same-city or in-state teams are almost always split between the NFC and AFC.
NFCAFC
RamsChargers
49ersRaiders
GiantsJets
CowboysTexans
EaglesSteelers
BuccaneersJags / Dolphins

In NCAAF, you have a lot more instances of teams sharing conferences. Washington-WSU, Oregon-OSU, UCLA-USC, Stanford-Cal, Arizona-ASU, Texas-A&M, Oklahoma-OSU, Kansas-KSU, Michigan-MSU, Alabama-Auburn, Ole Miss-State, Tenn-Vandy, UNC-Duke-NCST-Wake, FSU-Miami

There are certainly notable exceptions (UGA-GT, Iowa-ISU) but in general, college tends to prioritize geographical similarity. It's much closer to the NBA (East-vs-West) in that regard instead of the NFL/MLB where both leagues span the whole country.

It'll be interesting to see which route the new B1G/SEC goes. I can see cases for both. The traditionalist in me likes the idea of seeing a 3-way divisional battle between Gators, Noles, and Canes every year. That's cool. That screams CFB to me, even if it means mixing up the ACC/SEC. Or putting together some MD/PA/VA division that includes Pitt, PSU, Maryland, WVU, UVA and VT. That's interesting and "feels" like CFB.

But, on the other hand, I like the idea of the two major players having a national footprint. Maybe Texas A&M grabs TCU and runs to the Big Ten? Or maybe the SEC decides they don't want to be confined to one corner of the country and makes a play for Arizona, ASU, Cal and Stanford? Different? Sure. But kind of cool in a new sort of way.

I'm just excited to see where it all goes.
Some of the NFC/AFC separation came to be because of the division within the AFL and NFL, although over time I think they've looked to strike geographic balance between the conferences rather than separation, baseball is similar in this regard.

I'd expect conferences allegiances to remain mostly the same if they combine, just due to history. Could see some crossover, specifically amongst teams that have less historical connection to their conference. I'd expect them to try and keep rivalries together where they can. Rivalry matchups draw eyes, which is good for TV.
 
The bolded is the real crux of it. In a few years there's only going to be two power conferences and A&M is already in one. Money will be the same, access to everything else basically identical as well. With Saban gone the SEC is no longer Alabama and the rest, it's way more open. A&M stays and relishes beating Uterus every year.

“Uterus.” Nice. :Lol:
 
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The question isn't whether the B1G would take them. I think they would given their recent moves and the fact it would ultimately continue to strengthen the conference. The question is why would A&M want to choose to make that move? USC/UCLA/Oregon/Washington made the move because their conference was about to die. Florida State/Clemson/Miami/UNC would want to make the move because their conference doesn't make nearly as much money and is only being held up by their success, which still wasn't good enough to make the CFP this year.

Why would A&M make that move, beyond not wanting to deal with Texas? The money between the SEC and B1G is comparable. The B1G would provide them a little more money now, but who is to say that things won't flip whenever the SEC does their next media deal? I see very few pros in the pro/con list of why A&M would want to make the move.
their hatred of the longhorns is enough motivation. i doubt they flip the payouts and the SEC gets more given they are staying regional. less tv markets, less money. you bring in A&M, you get every tv in texas which you may not have now with the b1g network. plus A&M could be a hub for early summer games like baseball.
 
10 Million reasons a year for aTm to leave. 10 Million 1 counting UT.

No one should discount the animus between the Aggies and the Whorns. It's a thing down here.
 
Some of the NFC/AFC separation came to be because of the division within the AFL and NFL, although over time I think they've looked to strike geographic balance between the conferences rather than separation, baseball is similar in this regard.

I'd expect conferences allegiances to remain mostly the same if they combine, just due to history. Could see some crossover, specifically amongst teams that have less historical connection to their conference. I'd expect them to try and keep rivalries together where they can. Rivalry matchups draw eyes, which is good for TV.

Yep.

For this reason, I could see an "SEC" division that includes Pitt, Syracuse, & WVU. It's not traditional southern territory, but I don't see the B1G wanting to double down on that region when we already have the regional big dog (PSU) plus Maryland and Rutgers.

Same for teams like Colorado, Utah, etc. They could be an interesting SEC match.
 
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Yeah, I just don't know if the toxicity pushes to that level. The still play each other in other sports, besides football. [They play each other in baseball next week.]

A&M did leave a "somewhat" long standing relationship to join the SEC, but moving to the SEC was clearly the better move, regardless of the Texas stuff. Similar to Nebraska leaving the conference, it was nice to get out from under Texas's thumb, but it was also the right move to make with them removed from the equation. I don't personally think A&M moving to the conference is the right move for them, if you ignore Texas joining the SEC. I don't think Texas joining the conference does enough to tip that scale.

I could end up being wrong.

And, A&M going back to the Big 12 would be a massive regression. I think that's even less likely than them moving to the B1G.
I agree. I think the move to the SEC by Texas is often misinterpreted as being all about getting away from Texas. It was primarily to get into a much better conference. Leaving Texas was just the cherry. Leaving SEC for the BIG doesn’t offer the same upgrade in flavor and thus the cherry doesn’t matter.
 



I think you could very easily condense things down into about 40 or so teams that truly care about football at the highest level. Schools like Rutgers, Indiana, Maryland, Vanderbilt, etc. don't belong on the same tier as Alabama, LSU, Ohio State, etc. There are a number of B1G/SEC teams I'd like see removed in favor of some of the ACC/Big XII teams.

I don't know what the magic number is or how long it will take, but at some point we'll see it get broken off into just the "top programs".
I think the number will be closer to 60 as the Rutgers and Vanderbilts will get grandfathered in. I believe the top half of the Big 12 and Acc will find a home and an additional independent 5 or so. The value of the Arizona, Oklahoma states and Dukes are still there market wise and being part of a bigger and better conference ties will create some synergies. Not every team is going to be an Ohio State, Alabama or Texas. This super conference will need filler teams and Nebraska is proof that you don’t have to limit it to high market population centers such as the NFL does to be successful. I’m not sure the public is ready to go from 135 teams down to 35-40. 60-70 yes. Even those numbers will bring a lot of controversy.
 
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"top programs".

Top programs sounds real nice but politics will be in play. Kansas state for example don’t stand a chance of bumping northwest, Illinois or Indiana IMO.

Don’t think for a second this will come down to football. Nebraska is enough of a brand and has enough financial backing but the b1g would have no problem cutting us out if it came down to it. There is way too much financial power in college football for it to just be handed out on merit. No chance
 


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