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Supreme Court rules in favor of NCAA Athletes

Let the bidding begin. Could be the end of amateur sports. NCAA caused a lot of their own problems but the schools that have a limited budget will not be able to compete in recruiting. The rich will get richer. Also the question becomes, are they employees, independent contractors or what. IRS will want to know.
It's been a facade for some time.

This will definitely accelerate the trend, and accentuate the already massive gap between some of the haves and have-nots, but yeah, one of the big takeaways is that a lot of student-athletes are going to get an eye-opening look into tax liability.
 

Mr.Bennett

Recruit
In terms of football and M basketball this not only makes a ton of sense, it's also right. The players deserve compensation for their labor. Yes, a full ride scholarship is valuable but it pales in comparison to the value created for the athletic department and university.

Questions there are obviously more questions than answers right now (who gets paid, what form does that compensation take?), but some less-obvious ripple effect questions:

What happens to the salaries of administrators and coaches?
Does this end the era of facilities expansion or do universities start reaching out to local communities for public funding like pro sports team have?
What happens to non-revenue sports and what are the associated Title IX implications?
Does this impact the willingness of donors to contribute?
 
In terms of football and M basketball this not only makes a ton of sense, it's also right. The players deserve compensation for their labor. Yes, a full ride scholarship is valuable but it pales in comparison to the value created for the athletic department and university.

Questions there are obviously more questions than answers right now (who gets paid, what form does that compensation take?), but some less-obvious ripple effect questions:

What happens to the salaries of administrators and coaches?
Does this end the era of facilities expansion or do universities start reaching out to local communities for public funding like pro sports team have?
What happens to non-revenue sports and what are the associated Title IX implications?
Does this impact the willingness of donors to contribute?
Good thing both the NCAA & Supreme Court excel in providing clarity on how to operate in the real world under new regulatory realities...

:Spitdrink:
 

12huskers

"PAIN IS WEAKNESS LEAVING THE BODY"
2 Year Member
Let the bidding begin. Could be the end of amateur sports. NCAA caused a lot of their own problems but the schools that have a limited budget will not be able to compete in recruiting. The rich will get richer. Also the question becomes, are they employees, independent contractors or what. IRS will want to know.
i hear ya, but the richer have been getting richer since tv got involved in the 70's, maybe a little earlier. nbc and nd, along with the sec network, longhorn network etc. osu, bama, clemson and all the other big boys with big budgets, have always dominated college football.
 

Ringo

Recruit
2 Year Member
Good thing both the NCAA & Supreme Court excel in providing clarity on how to operate in the real world under new regulatory realities...

:Spitdrink:
The only job the court has is to interpret the law and make a decision. The NCAA is now so neutered I doubt they can do anything any longer that effects the real world. This will be a complete free for all and the big boys always win those.
This pretty much completes my loss of interest in college sports. I will catch a few games now and then, but it will no longer be a Saturday must see. They may make more money but the fans will eventually have a say in all of this.
 

NU_Alum

Heisman
5 Year Member
In terms of football and M basketball this not only makes a ton of sense, it's also right. The players deserve compensation for their labor. Yes, a full ride scholarship is valuable but it pales in comparison to the value created for the athletic department and university.

Questions there are obviously more questions than answers right now (who gets paid, what form does that compensation take?), but some less-obvious ripple effect questions:

What happens to the salaries of administrators and coaches?
Does this end the era of facilities expansion or do universities start reaching out to local communities for public funding like pro sports team have?
What happens to non-revenue sports and what are the associated Title IX implications?
Does this impact the willingness of donors to contribute?
I'm always curious at the "it pales in comparison to the value created..." argument.

Why is that a consideration at all? If you take a job making $50k/year and you provide $2M/year in value to your company do you deserve to make more than you agreed to in the beginning?

Secondly, the argument fails to take into account the risk and infrastructure costs that are 100% born by the schools. If an athlete doesn't pan out or gets injured he/she is still going to get the scholarship (usually) and the school is stuck carrying his costs for 4/5 years with no return.

Third, what's going to happen when the vast majority of schools decide they can't compete at the D1 level anymore because they already lose money (as does nearly every football program in the country already)? The majority of kids that are getting "just an education, housing, food" are going to be out completely.

I think this idea makes a lot of sense on paper, much like socialism, but isn't going to work out well in real life.
 

Shazzy

Recruit
I'm always curious at the "it pales in comparison to the value created..." argument.

Why is that a consideration at all? If you take a job making $50k/year and you provide $2M/year in value to your company do you deserve to make more than you agreed to in the beginning?

Secondly, the argument fails to take into account the risk and infrastructure costs that are 100% born by the schools. If an athlete doesn't pan out or gets injured he/she is still going to get the scholarship (usually) and the school is stuck carrying his costs for 4/5 years with no return.

Third, what's going to happen when the vast majority of schools decide they can't compete at the D1 level anymore because they already lose money (as does nearly every football program in the country already)? The majority of kids that are getting "just an education, housing, food" are going to be out completely.

I think this idea makes a lot of sense on paper, much like socialism, but isn't going to work out well in real life.
Finding an excuse to bad-mouthing socialism while describing the highest form of capitalism takes some talent. Well played sir.
 
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The only job the court has is to interpret the law and make a decision. The NCAA is now so neutered I doubt they can do anything any longer that effects the real world. This will be a complete free for all and the big boys always win those.
This pretty much completes my loss of interest in college sports. I will catch a few games now and then, but it will no longer be a Saturday must see. They may make more money but the fans will eventually have a say in all of this.
I mean, the USSC ruled last summer that nearly half of Oklahoma is an Indian reservation for the purposes of prosecutorial authority, throwing like a century and a half of legal cases & governmental action into question because they didn't provide any real framework on how broadly to interpret the decision. I get they don't make law, but IMO their ruling should be intended to include some practical outline that doesn't just kick the table out from underneath everything without saying which parts of the table are not allowed.

Same deal here, probably going to have a very uneven playing field as different schools & states play a guessing game with what will be allowed.

Like you alluded to, probably gonna be unforeseen consequences that change the landscape well beyond the short-term checks that are being cashed.
 
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