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Stay classy, Cardinal

Native

ToungeInCheek since 2010
5 Year Member
I'm sure the winky was just not captured very well on the Stanford white board. Bless your heart. ;)
 

LarstheRed

Junior Varsity
5 Year Member
So, it's okay to point a gun quote-unquote and then give the finger?
nice real classy
It’s a locker room! What is ever classy about a locker room? We drew sex acts being performed on opponents in their media guide. I’ve heard of individual pictures being put in urinals for a weeks worth of ‘baptism’.

I just don’t get this moral outrage. What’s next? Are we going to be shocked athletes talk about...wait for it...picking someone up in a bar and having sex?!?! Oh the horror of less than polite locker room behavior.
 
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Elwood von Kiowa

Grad Assistant
5 Year Member
It’s a locker room! What is ever classy about a locker room? We drew sex acts being performed on opponents in their media guide. I’ve heard of individual pictures being put in urinals for a weeks worth of ‘baptism’.

I just don’t get this moral outrage. What’s next? Are we going to be shocked athletes talk about...wait for it...picking someone up in a bar and having sex?!?! Oh the horror of less than polite locker room behavior.
I'm not at all shocked by what might go on in locker rooms. And the cartoon on the white board, taken by itself, would be no big deal.

But this is just one more example in the pattern of disrespectful behavior by the Stanford program, that shows who they are. Maybe I wouldn't be so "sensitive" if this was the first idiotic thing I'd ever seen from the "Tree". Maybe it just set me off because I'd just spent two evenings behind their idiot band, director, and cheerleaders.

And the other thing that makes it an issue is the blatant hypocrisy of the entire Stanford program.
 
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LarstheRed

Junior Varsity
5 Year Member
I'm not at all shocked by what might go on in locker rooms. And the cartoon on the white board, taken by itself, would be no big deal.

But this is just one more example in the pattern of disrespectful behavior by the Stanford program, that shows who they are. Maybe I wouldn't be so "sensitive" if this was the first idiotic thing I'd ever seen from the tree. Maybe it just set me off because I'd just spent two evenings behind their idiot band, director, and cheerleaders.

And the other thing that makes it an issue is the blatant hypocrisy of the entire Stanford program.
Stanford isn’t any different than any other school, which is probably why you see this as more than it is. If it were LSU, you’d think it ‘typical’, but it’s Stanford, so it’s a big deal that the smart kids are just like the rest when it comes to locker room behavior.
 

Farmer Jake

Recruit
I'm not at all shocked by what might go on in locker rooms. And the cartoon on the white board, taken by itself, would be no big deal.

But this is just one more example in the pattern of disrespectful behavior by the Stanford program, that shows who they are. Maybe I wouldn't be so "sensitive" if this was the first idiotic thing I'd ever seen from the tree. Maybe it just set me off because I'd just spent two evenings behind their idiot band, director, and cheerleaders.

And the other thing that makes it an issue is the blatant hypocrisy of the entire Stanford program.
I heard a story about a former coach and teacher dealing with a similar incident that had taken place in a locker room that was under his control. He didn't ask who did the "artwork", but told the team he didn't approve. The coach added that the more of this behavior is tolerated, the more likely it is to get carried outside of the locker room, into the real world. The real world may not tolerate such behavior in an action that was favorable to the "artist". He asked how the team members would react if this type of "artwork" was directed toward their mother, sister, girlfriend, future wife, or daughter. (I will add in this day and age of social media, how a future employer might view the artwork. People have lost out on job opportunities for less on social media.)

This coach had the utmost respect of most of the team. By the time the coach was done, one team member had destroyed the "artwork". That was a lesson in learning "class".

As these young people are learning to become adults, one of the best lessons to learn is to avoid and discredit some of the most basic instincts. Even in a locker room.
 

Elwood von Kiowa

Grad Assistant
5 Year Member
I heard a story about a former coach and teacher dealing with a similar incident that had taken place in a locker room that was under his control. He didn't ask who did the "artwork", but told the team he didn't approve. The coach added that the more of this behavior is tolerated, the more likely it is to get carried outside of the locker room, into the real world. The real world may not tolerate such behavior in an action that was favorable to the "artist". He asked how the team members would react if this type of "artwork" was directed toward their mother, sister, girlfriend, future wife, or daughter. (I will add in this day and age of social media, how a future employer might view the artwork. People have lost out on job opportunities for less on social media.)

This coach had the utmost respect of most of the team. By the time the coach was done, one team member had destroyed the "artwork". That was a lesson in learning "class".

As these young people are learning to become adults, one of the best lessons to learn is to avoid and discredit some of the most basic instincts. Even in a locker room.
Thank you.

Wisdom indeed.
 

Farmer Jake

Recruit
Stanford isn’t any different than any other school, which is probably why you see this as more than it is. If it were LSU, you’d think it ‘typical’, but it’s Stanford, so it’s a big deal that the smart kids are just like the rest when it comes to locker room behavior.
I'm sure it happens almost everywhere, and I'm no longer shocked by anything that takes place. No school is completely immune from such actions by one or more individuals. But that doesn't mean it should have been done by anyone on any team, or tolerated by any adult in charge.

It would have been more appropriate for an apology to have come from the team members who did the work, and the coaches who allowed it. It shouldn't happen in any institute of higher education (high school or college). Unfortunately, I have been just as guilty of being stupid as almost everyone else. I was taught at an early age, if you screw up, you not only apologize, but you try to make it right to the best of your ability. Like everything else in life, the earlier you learn something, the easier it is to incorporate it into your life in general. Or in the case of bad behavior, to keep it out of your life. College (and high school) students should have learned this by now.
 

LarstheRed

Junior Varsity
5 Year Member
Geez, I seriously can’t believe this is a topic, much less the moral outrage some of you project. And this, ‘nothing surprises me these days’ completely ignores we were doing this and probably worse 40 years ago. I think people have either fallen into this ridiculous notion we really believe all this PC crap is the way of the world, or the days of Osborne was all about great players with nothing but Boy Scout behavior...neither of which true or real.
 

Farmer Jake

Recruit
Geez, I seriously can’t believe this is a topic, much less the moral outrage some of you project. And this, ‘nothing surprises me these days’ completely ignores we were doing this and probably worse 40 years ago. I think people have either fallen into this ridiculous notion we really believe all this PC crap is the way of the world, or the days of Osborne was all about great players with nothing but Boy Scout behavior...neither of which true or real.
I do agree with you on this post. I will go further and say this kind of behavior has gone on for decades, if not centuries. And you are also correct on the Osborne era. Way too much evidence to not agree with you. But just because it has happened in the past, and continues to happen today, doesn't mean it should be condoned.

I don't know if I am morally outraged by the action of one or a few individuals. I do believe that generally college students (and human beings as a whole) are good people. Maybe I'm just disappointed that this behavior still happens, and it is not always discouraged when it happens. I guess I just grew up in a different world.
 

LarstheRed

Junior Varsity
5 Year Member
I do agree with you on this post. I will go further and say this kind of behavior has gone on for decades, if not centuries. And you are also correct on the Osborne era. Way too much evidence to not agree with you. But just because it has happened in the past, and continues to happen today, doesn't mean it should be condoned.

I don't know if I am morally outraged by the action of one or a few individuals. I do believe that generally college students (and human beings as a whole) are good people. Maybe I'm just disappointed that this behavior still happens, and it is not always discouraged when it happens. I guess I just grew up in a different world.
There is a big difference between not condoning, and demonizing. Some of the handwringing and moral outrage I’m reading about this is overzealous. A quick, private call to Cook would have been sufficient, so this entire ‘public apology’ crap puts far more light and emphasis on it than need be.

As for a coach’s reaction, I’d tell them I didn’t want to see that junk on the board, and adding motivation to a dangerous team isn’t smart...but that’s where it would end.
 
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Farmer Jake

Recruit
There is a big difference between not condoning, and demonizing. Some of the handwringing and moral outrage I’m reading about this is overzealous. A quick, private call to Cook would have been sufficient, so this entire ‘public apology’ crap puts far more light and emphasis on it than need be.

As for a coach’s reaction, I’d tell them I didn’t want to see that junk on the board, and adding motivation to a dangerous team isn’t smart...but that’s where it would end.
Maybe the private call took place, and we just don't know it (because it was private :wink:). What I put in bold, I really like that. I just wish it would have been erased so no one outside the locker room would ever have seen it. That way the handwringing and moral outrage would never have existed. And this thread would never have existed. The only thing we would have to post about would be the great championship match we witnessed between two great teams and the only thing we would change would be the final score. Hopefully, that will take place next season.
 

CrnhskrBob

Husker Immortal
15 Year Member
It’s a locker room! What is ever classy about a locker room? We drew sex acts being performed on opponents in their media guide. I’ve heard of individual pictures being put in urinals for a weeks worth of ‘baptism’.

I just don’t get this moral outrage. What’s next? Are we going to be shocked athletes talk about...wait for it...picking someone up in a bar and having sex?!?! Oh the horror of less than polite locker room behavior.
You have a right to your opinion. No reason why you have to berate mine. I just thought Stanford had more class. Apparently, you were never around class. Your misfortune :(
 

CrnhskrBob

Husker Immortal
15 Year Member
I do agree with you on this post. I will go further and say this kind of behavior has gone on for decades, if not centuries. And you are also correct on the Osborne era. Way too much evidence to not agree with you. But just because it has happened in the past, and continues to happen today, doesn't mean it should be condoned.

I don't know if I am morally outraged by the action of one or a few individuals. I do believe that generally college students (and human beings as a whole) are good people. Maybe I'm just disappointed that this behavior still happens, and it is not always discouraged when it happens. I guess I just grew up in a different world.
Amen! So did I, FJ
 
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