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Smoking with hickory

KingTM

All Big 10
5 Year Member
Dude at work just gave me a bunch of hickory from a fallen tree on some land he just bought. This will go nicely with my stack of cherry and apple.

What is your wood of choice? I like a more mild smoke flavor. For pork, I normally use cherry and/or apple. For beef, I like hickory.
 

Bean

Grey Shirt
5 Year Member
Hickory, Mesquite and Apple. I have some Oak that I haven't tried yet but I've some BBQ shows that use oak exclusively.
 

chicago husker

Scout Team
2 Year Member
I've always wanted to try Pecan but I can't seem to find any, around these parts.
I use a pellet smoker so all types of wood are a lot easier to come by and you can blend them. For Thanksgiving turkey i use an apple pecan mixture.
 

KingTM

All Big 10
5 Year Member
I use a pellet smoker so all types of wood are a lot easier to come by and you can blend them. For Thanksgiving turkey i use an apple pecan mixture.
Nice. I smoked my first bird last year with some apple and it was incredibly moist, juicy and tasty. Roasted a backup in the oven but it really wasn't necessary. I cannot wait for the 24th to get here, its a fat kid's dream come true. :Biggrin:
 

chicago husker

Scout Team
2 Year Member
Nice. I smoked my first bird last year with some apple and it was incredibly moist, juicy and tasty. Roasted a backup in the oven but it really wasn't necessary. I cannot wait for the 24th to get here, its a fat kid's dream come true. :Biggrin:
do you brine your turkey? I have always used a wet brine but this year I am going to dry brine. I also spatchcock the bird and point the legs toward the hot side of the smoker.
 

jikastew

All Legend
10 Year Member
I stopped brining thanksgiving turkeys a couple years ago. The effort wasn't worth it. Turkeys take on smoke fast so there's no reason to go slow., and in fact, I like going pretty fast. Get that skin vaporized quickly and get the meat up to temp. Nothing worse than rubbery skin.

I use apple for turkey, but can't say I really care all that much. Hickory would probably over-punch the smoke flavor, but who knows.

Hell, maybe I'll brine this year just to change it up. It's not like it's that much effort. I go about 300-315 degrees in the smoker. When I go 225 like most do, I get that crap rubbery skin. Even the dogs won't eat that.
 
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KingTM

All Big 10
5 Year Member
do you brine your turkey? I have always used a wet brine but this year I am going to dry brine. I also spatchcock the bird and point the legs toward the hot side of the smoker.
That's exactly how I did mine (I've also done tons of whole chickens, this way), brined it for 24 hours, spatchcocked it and threw it on. I actually smoked that one on my Weber kettle using the snake method and it turned out great. Weather was crappy that day and I have a covered deck where my grills sit but my smoker is down on the patio, exposed. Easy choice. :thumbsup:

I stopped brining thanksgiving turkeys a couple years ago. The effort wasn't worth it. Turkeys take on smoke fast so there's no reason to go slow., and in fact, I like going pretty fast. Get that skin vaporized quickly and get the meat up to temp. Nothing worse than rubbery skin.

I use apple for turkey, but can't say I really care all that much. Hickory would probably over-punch the smoke flavor, but who knows.

Hell, maybe I'll brine this year just to change it up. It's not like it's that much effort. I go about 300-315 degrees in the smoker. When I go 225 like most do, I get that crap rubbery skin. Even the dogs won't eat that.
I go a little higher, as well but not into the 300's. I flip my chicken over and place it directly over the coals for a few minutes if the skin isn't crispy enough, already. Should work on a turkey.
 

Big Burruss

Travel Squad
5 Year Member
I stopped brining thanksgiving turkeys a couple years ago. The effort wasn't worth it. Turkeys take on smoke fast so there's no reason to go slow., and in fact, I like going pretty fast. Get that skin vaporized quickly and get the meat up to temp. Nothing worse than rubbery skin.

I use apple for turkey, but can't say I really care all that much. Hickory would probably over-punch the smoke flavor, but who knows.

Hell, maybe I'll brine this year just to change it up. It's not like it's that much effort. I go about 300-315 degrees in the smoker. When I go 225 like most do, I get that crap rubbery skin. Even the dogs won't eat that.

Yep. No low and slow for birds.
 

chicago husker

Scout Team
2 Year Member
That's exactly how I did mine (I've also done tons of whole chickens, this way), brined it for 24 hours, spatchcocked it and threw it on. I actually smoked that one on my Weber kettle using the snake method and it turned out great. Weather was crappy that day and I have a covered deck where my grills sit but my smoker is down on the patio, exposed. Easy choice. :thumbsup:



I go a little higher, as well but not into the 300's. I flip my chicken over and place it directly over the coals for a few minutes if the skin isn't crispy enough, already. Should work on a turkey.
if you dry brine with a 3 kosher salt to 1 baking powder ratio it will dramatically help crisp up the skin.
 

chicago husker

Scout Team
2 Year Member
Interesting. I'll have to look into that. I brine mainly for moistness, how do you fare in that regard, with this method?
it has the same effect but tends to make the skin much crispier. Go to Serious Eats website and they have a current article on it. I have using it on chicken for quite some time but for some reason i have always wet brine my turkey. old habits of old farts hard to change.
 
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