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Recruiting Reference Guide

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TheOneders

Recruit
2 Year Member
Recruiting Calendar
  1. Quiet Period: June 1 through July 31, 2017 [except for (1) below]
    1. Dead Period: June 26 through July 9, 2017
  2. Dead Period: August 1-31, 2017
  3. Quiet Period: September 1 - November 25, 2017 [except for (1) below]
    1. Evaluation Period: Forty-two (42) evaluation days during the months of September, October and November, selected at the discretion of the institution and designated in writing in the office of the director of athletics; authorized off-campus recruiters shall not visit a prospective student-athlete’s educational institution on more than one calendar day during this period
  4. Contact Period: November 26, 2017, through February 3, 2018 [except for (1) through (2) below]:
    1. Six (6) in-person, off-campus contacts per prospective student-athlete shall be permitted during this time period with not more than one permitted in any one calendar week (Sunday through Saturday) or partial calendar week.
      1. Quiet Period: December 17, 2017, for all junior college prospective student athletes who intend to enroll midyear
      2. Dead Period: December 18, 2017, through January 11, 2018: [applicable to all prospective student-athletes (see Bylaw 13.02.5.5.2)]
  5. Quiet Period: February 4, 2018
  6. Dead Period: February 5-8, 2018
  7. Quiet Period: February 9, 2018 through April 14, 2018
Signing Periods
  1. High School
    1. Early Period: December 20, 2017 through December 22, 2017
    2. Regular Period: February 7, 2018 through April 1, 2018
  2. Junior College
    1. Early Period: December 20, 2017 through January 15, 2018
    2. Regular Period: February 7, 2018 through April 1, 2018
Calendar Definitions
  1. What is a contact?
    1. A contact occurs any time a college coach says more than hello during a face-to-face contact with a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents off the college’s campus.
  2. What is a contact period?
    1. During a contact period a college coach may have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, watch student-athletes compete and visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents.
  3. What is an evaluation period?
    1. During an evaluation period a college coach may watch college-bound student-athletes compete, visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents. However, a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents off the college’s campus during an evaluation period.
  4. What is a quiet period?
    1. During a quiet period, a college coach may only have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents on the college’s campus. A coach may not watch student-athletes compete (unless a competition occurs on the college’s campus) or visit their high schools. Coaches may write or telephone college-bound student-athletes or their parents during this time.
  5. What is a dead period?
    1. During a dead period a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, and may not watch student-athletes compete or visit their high schools. Coaches may write and telephone student-athletes or their parents during a dead period.
  6. What is the difference between an official visit and an unofficial visit?
    1. Any visit to a college campus by a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents paid for by the college is an official visit. Visits paid for by college-bound student-athletes or their parents are unofficial visits.

      During an official visit the college can pay for transportation to and from the college for the prospect, lodging and three meals per day for both the prospect and the parent or guardian, as well as reasonable entertainment expenses including three tickets to a home sports event.

      The only expenses a college-bound student-athlete may receive from a college during an unofficial visit are three tickets to a home sports event.
  7. What is a National Letter of Intent?
    1. A National Letter of Intent is signed by a college-bound student-athlete when the student-athlete agrees to attend a Division I or II college or university for one academic year. Participating institutions agree to provide financial aid for one academic year to the student-athlete as long as the student-athlete is admitted to the school and is eligible for financial aid under NCAA rules. Other forms of financial aid do not guarantee the student-athlete financial aid.

      The National Letter of Intent is voluntary and not required for a student-athlete to receive financial aid or participate in sports.

      Signing an National Letter of Intent ends the recruiting process since participating schools are prohibited from recruiting student-athletes who have already signed letters with other participating schools.

      A student-athlete who has signed a National Letter of Intent may request a release from his or her contract with the school. If a student-athlete signs a National Letter of Intent with one school but attends a different school, he or she will lose one full year of eligibility and must complete a full academic year at their new school before being eligible to compete.
  8. What are recruiting calendars?
    1. Recruiting calendars help promote the well-being prospective student-athletes and coaches and ensure competitive equity by defining certain time periods in which recruiting may or may not occur in a particular sport.
 
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TheOneders

Recruit
2 Year Member
B1G Over Signing
Chad Hawley — Big Ten associate commissioner for compliance — to clarify the league’s over-signing rules. A few noteworthy items from our conversation are below…

>> Before signing day, the conference requires programs to make a “good faith” assessment of how many scholarship slots will be available next year, Hawley said. This could be turning pro, exhausting eligibility, quitting, transferring, etc.

>> Once a team has that number of scholarships available, Hawley said, it’s allowed to add three. That’s how many recruits it can bring in.

>> Said Hawley: “We ask our institutions to let us know what that (number) is, to give us that assessment before signing day, understanding that it changes.”

>> So basically, if the schools intend to over-sign, the conference is asking to be notified beforehand.
-Example: If a team has 16 graduating seniors plus 2 open scholarships, then they would have 18 openings. The B1G would allow that team to then sign up to 21 prospects for their current recruiting class.

Scholarship Limits
  1. 85 Roster Scholarship Limit
    1. There shall be an annual limit of 25 on the number of initial counters (per Bylaw 15.02.3.1) and an annual limit of 85 on the total number of counters (including initial counters) in football at each institution.
  2. Initial Counters
    1. A “counter” is an individual who is receiving institutional financial aid that is countable against the aid limitations in a sport.
    2. An “initial counter” is a counter who is receiving countable financial aid in a sport for the first time.
  3. Who Counts as an Initial Counter?
    1. Recruited Student-Athlete Entering in Fall Term, Aided in First Year (recruit enrolling in summer/fall). - A student-athlete recruited by the awarding institution who enters in the fall term and receives institutional financial aid (based in any degree on athletics ability) during the first academic year in residence shall be an initial counter for that year in football.
    2. Recruited Student-Athlete Entering After Fall Term, Aided in First Year (greenshirt or recruit enrolling early in spring). - A student-athlete recruited by the awarding institution who enters after the first term of the academic year and immediately receives institutional financial aid (based in any degree on athletics ability) shall be an initial counter for either the current academic year (if the institution’s annual limit has not been reached) or the next academic year. The student-athlete shall be included in the institution’s total counter limit during the academic year in which the aid was first received.
    3. Recruited Student-Athlete, Aid Received After First Year (blueshirt or walk-on earning scholarship after first year). - A recruited student athlete (including a student-athlete who was not a qualifier) who first receives athletically related financial aid after the student-athlete’s first academic year in residence shall be an initial counter for that academic year in which the aid is first received, if such aid is received during the fall term. However, such a student-athlete who first receives athletically related financial aid in the second or third term of an academic year may be considered an initial counter during the academic year in which aid was first received or the next academic year. In either case, the student-athlete shall be included in the institution’s total counter limit during the academic year in which the aid was first received.
    4. Recruited Student-Athlete, Varsity Competition (non-athletic scholarship). - A recruited student-athlete receiving institutional financial aid having been granted without regard in any degree to athletics ability becomes an initial counter in the first academic year in which the student-athlete competes on the varsity level.
    5. *In football, a counter who was not recruited (per Bylaw 15.02.8) and/or offered financial aid to participate in football and who competes in football and one or more sports (including basketball) must be counted in football (see Bylaw 15.5.9.1).
    6. Junior college transfer
    7. Four-year college transfer
    8. Graduate transfer
  4. Who Does Not Count as an Initial Counter
    1. Aid First Awarded After Second Year (walk-on receiving scholarship after finishing two years at a school). A student-athlete who has been in residence at the certifying institution for at least two academic years may receive athletically related financial aid for the first time without such aid counting as an initial award,
    2. Returning Two-Year Transfer. A student-athlete who previously was an initial counter and who transferred to a two-year college shall not be an initial counter upon return to the original institution.

Define Recruited Athlete
Recruiting is any solicitation of a prospective student-athlete or a prospective student- athlete’s relatives (or legal guardians) by an institutional staff member or by a representative of the institution's athletics interests for the purpose of securing the prospective student-athlete’s enrollment and ultimate participation in the institution's intercollegiate athletics program.

-Recruited Prospective Student-Athlete. Actions by staff members or athletics representatives that cause a prospective student-athlete to become a recruited prospective student-athlete at that institution are:
  1. Providing the prospective student-athlete with an official visit;
  2. Having an arranged, in-person, off-campus encounter with the prospective student-athlete or the prospective student-athlete’s parents, relatives or legal guardians;
  3. Initiating or arranging a telephone contact with the prospective student-athlete, the prospective student-athlete’s relatives or legal guardians on more than one occasion for the purpose of recruitment; or
  4. Issuing a National Letter of Intent or the institution’s written offer of athletically related financial aid to the prospective student-athlete. Issuing a written offer of athletically related financial aid to a prospective student-athlete to attend a summer session prior to full-time enrollment does not cause the prospective student-athlete to become recruited.
 
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TheOneders

Recruit
2 Year Member
Recruiting's Color Wheel
  1. Redshirt
    1. Players who redshirt are able to participate in every team function minus the games themselves; a player who plays in a single game will lose his redshirt status. By taking a redshirt, players are given five years to complete their four seasons of on-field eligibility.
  2. Greenshirt
    1. Greenshirt recruits are those who enroll one semester ahead of schedule and join an FBS program for the start of the spring term in January. Typically, greenshirts are the most likely to earn immediate playing time as a true freshman.
    2. Example: Broc Bando, Tristan Gebbia, Keyshawn Johnson Jr, Jaevon McQuitty, and Avery Roberts enrolled a semester early for the spring term in 2017.
  3. Grayshirt
    1. Grayshirts are recruits who are offered a delayed scholarship. Essentially, grayshirts will postpone their enrollment until after the conclusion of the upcoming season; they will take classes, often as part-time students, but not officially join the program until the ensuing spring semester.
    2. Example: Jacob Hickman signed with the 2005 class. He joined the team a semester late in December 2005 for Alamo Bowl practices.
    3. **David Sutton committed to Nebraska for the 2011 class as a grayshirt. A scholarship came open during the summer allowing him to enroll on time.
    4. **Braylon Heard (class of 2010, but enrolled in 2011) and Charles Jackson (class of 2011, but enrolled in 2012) could be considered grayshirts. But that was more to do with academics than being a planned grayshirt.
  4. Blueshirt
    1. Meanwhile, blueshirts represent the newest loophole for FBS programs to accumulate depth while not affecting their annual numbers. Like grayshirt recruits, blueshirts are counted toward the next season’s scholarship total.

      There is one distinct difference, however. Unlike grayshirts, a blueshirt is able to enroll and participate in team events in the fall. This allows programs to get the best of both worlds: FBS schools can delay a scholarship for the following year, allowing them to over-sign beyond the 25-scholarship limit, and get the use of a prospect immediately rather than waiting until the following spring.
    2. Example: Andy Janovich walked onto the team in 2012. He earned a scholarship prior to his true sophomore season in 2013. Not sure if he was recruited with the idea of being a blueshirt. He basically became one after being placed on scholarship after one year though.
Preferred Walk-On vs. Walk-On
  1. "Nine out of the 10 staffs we spoke with use the “preferred concept” and to those nine, the clear difference between a preferred walk-on versus someone who simply walks-on is that the preferred means he is guaranteed a spot on the 105 man roster day one of camp, while other walk-ons will have to go through tryouts to see if they can earn a spot on the roster."
    [*]Football is different from most other sports in that it has a roster size limit during part of the year. FBS football teams are limited to 105 participants between the start of fall camp and the first game or start of school (whichever comes first).
  2. Example: Coach Riley announced 9 preferred walk-ons with the 2016 recruiting class. The nine were: Ty Chaffin, Creighton Hamik, Tanner Hass, Branden Hohenstein, Todd Honas, Tavlin Hunt, Grant Jordan, Spencer Jordan, and Eli Sullivan.
  3. Example: After school started, Nebraska added five regular walk-ons to the 2016 roster. Sean Lambert, Ne'Land Smith, Jake Kitten, JUCO Matt Watts, and Isaac Armstrong.



Medical Hardship vs. Medical Exemption
  1. Medical Hardship (aka Medical Redshirt)
    1. A student-athlete can apply for a medical hardship waiver, which allows for an extra year of eligibility, if he or she suffers an injury or illness that prevents them from finishing the current season. The injury must occur during the first half of the season, and the player can't have participated in more than three games (or 30 percent of the scheduled games, whichever is greater). The Big 12 Conference determines whether to grant the waiver, but it can be appealed to the NCAA if denied. The medical hardship is sometimes called a “medical redshirt,” but can be used to gain a sixth year if an injury occurs when the player has already used his or her regular redshirt season.
    2. Example: Ndamukong Suh played in the first two games of the 2005 season before undergoing knee surgery. He received a medical redshirt for that season and became a redshirt freshman for the 2006 season.
  2. Medical Exemption
    1. A medical exemption can be given to an athlete who suffers an injury or illness that ends their career. It ensures that, for their remaining eligibility, they receive all the financial aid they would have received before the medical problem. A medical exemption does not count against the program's scholarship limit (for football, it is 85), but is still paid for from the program's budget. If the injury occurs during a season, that player still does count against the scholarship limit. Once the season ends, they can be moved to medical exemption and another scholarship is freed up.
    2. Example: Kody Spano was a 2008 QB recruit. He suffered a serious shoulder injury in May 2011 before his redshirt junior season. He retired from the game and was classified as a medical exemption in order to remain with the team and keep his scholarship.
 
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