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Radio Saturdays

CrabHusker

Alienating everyone, one post at a time.
5 Year Member
Occasionally I'll see, hear or smell something that brings back memories from the past. I'm not always blessed with perfect memories of things that happened in the last few years, sometimes not the last few days either, but I can recall with clarity that is sometimes disturbing things that are completely amazing to me from years ago.

Recently my youngest was home from school and happened to be up early Sunday morning watching an old Nebraska game on YouTube, only half paying attention while he did some homework. The game was an early season 1977 contest against Alabama. He was facing me and I couldn't see the screen on his laptop, but I could hear the audio of Keith Jackson and man did it bring back memories.

My family moved to Colorado from Nebraska in 1972. Cable TV didn't exist, so it was usually one local and one national game a weekend. That was all, so most Saturdays I listened to the Nebraska game on the radio. Coloradan's for Nebraska had some affiliation to the broadcasts that I don't think I ever really understood, but I'm quite positive I owe them a great debt for keeping me tied to Nebraska football for the decade between my arrival in enemy territory and the advent of cable TV and greatly enhanced access to Husker football. Every week I'd look through the TV guide looking for 'Nebraska' on Saturday's, usually to be disappointed except for one non conference game a year and two or three Big 8 games if I was lucky, so it was mostly radio broadcasts. I'd spend Saturday mornings making sure I'd taken care of all I needed to to be allowed to spend the three hours by the radio instead of working on something for my folks. Breakfast, chores, Nebraska football. I'd get chills running up and down my spine when I'd hear 'Nebraska Football is on the air!'

The play by play descriptions were only enhanced by my over active imagination to paint a picture I couldn't see. Lyle or his successors setting the stage, calling out the lineups, describing the formations, I lived for it all. Descriptions of their uniforms and those of the opponents, the crowd, the sky and weather, the sounds caught by the mikes that helped complete the picture were always part of my Saturdays.

Phrases like this from '76 still bounce around my memory to this day:

'Huskers in their home scarlet jerseys and cream pants in front of another sellout crowd at Memorial Stadium. NU with the football at their own 20, driving North to South, right to left, against the wind. I formation from the left hashmark, Ferragamo under center, Craig in the slot to the left, Malito split out to wide side'

The names I'll never forget. Ferragamo, Curtis Craig, Dave Butterfield, Chuck Malito, Andra Franklin, Tom Sorley, Richard Berns, Jeff Quinn, Junior Miller, Steve Damkroger, Tim Hager, IM Hipp, Jarvis Redwine and so many more. The games I recall like they were yesterday. The '76 loss to Iowa State and an early morning radio broadcast of the Hawaii road game. The '77 obliteration Oklahoma put on Nebraska that cost me a quarter bet to a school buddy. The '78 heartbreak against Missouri after finally getting the monkey off our backs the week before. I sat many a Saturday in the upstairs family room in front of my dad's old Telefunken, tuned into Husker football, rooting for the Big Red to win the day.

I can see it all like it happened yesterday. From the time I was 7 or 8 until my early 30's, I attended, watched on TV or listened to almost every Nebraska football game played. I'd say better than 75% of the games were radio broadcasts until the mid '80's and while I'm glad I can see them all now, I'll admit I miss the simpler times of 'Husker Football is on the air!'.

I was pissed when we had a few High School football games my junior and senior years on Saturday and not Friday night. I took the radio with me when I started working in construction and listened to the games as best I could, sometimes not so well when we were out in a field in the mountains or on the plains.

Times change and things move on, but I'll never forget those Saturday afternoons. I tried to explain it to my youngest while he studied and the '77 NU-Alabama game played in the background, but it just wasn't the same for him and isn't for his generation. They've always had video. They've always seen it, not heard it and imagined it. He'll never know what it was like to hear Lyle call a play, a score or a Husker victory. I remember it like it was last Saturday.
 

HuskerNash

Recruit
2 Year Member
Occasionally I'll see, hear or smell something that brings back memories from the past. I'm not always blessed with perfect memories of things that happened in the last few years, sometimes not the last few days either, but I can recall with clarity that is sometimes disturbing things that are completely amazing to me from years ago.

Recently my youngest was home from school and happened to be up early Sunday morning watching an old Nebraska game on YouTube, only half paying attention while he did some homework. The game was an early season 1977 contest against Alabama. He was facing me and I couldn't see the screen on his laptop, but I could hear the audio of Keith Jackson and man did it bring back memories.

My family moved to Colorado from Nebraska in 1972. Cable TV didn't exist, so it was usually one local and one national game a weekend. That was all, so most Saturdays I listened to the Nebraska game on the radio. Coloradan's for Nebraska had some affiliation to the broadcasts that I don't think I ever really understood, but I'm quite positive I owe them a great debt for keeping me tied to Nebraska football for the decade between my arrival in enemy territory and the advent of cable TV and greatly enhanced access to Husker football. Every week I'd look through the TV guide looking for 'Nebraska' on Saturday's, usually to be disappointed except for one non conference game a year and two or three Big 8 games if I was lucky, so it was mostly radio broadcasts. I'd spend Saturday mornings making sure I'd taken care of all I needed to to be allowed to spend the three hours by the radio instead of working on something for my folks. Breakfast, chores, Nebraska football. I'd get chills running up and down my spine when I'd hear 'Nebraska Football is on the air!'

The play by play descriptions were only enhanced by my over active imagination to paint a picture I couldn't see. Lyle or his successors setting the stage, calling out the lineups, describing the formations, I lived for it all. Descriptions of their uniforms and those of the opponents, the crowd, the sky and weather, the sounds caught by the mikes that helped complete the picture were always part of my Saturdays.

Phrases like this from '76 still bounce around my memory to this day:

'Huskers in their home scarlet jerseys and cream pants in front of another sellout crowd at Memorial Stadium. NU with the football at their own 20, driving North to South, right to left, against the wind. I formation from the left hashmark, Ferragamo under center, Craig in the slot to the left, Malito split out to wide side'

The names I'll never forget. Ferragamo, Curtis Craig, Dave Butterfield, Chuck Malito, Andra Franklin, Tom Sorley, Richard Berns, Jeff Quinn, Junior Miller, Steve Damkroger, Tim Hager, IM Hipp, Jarvis Redwine and so many more. The games I recall like they were yesterday. The '76 loss to Iowa State and an early morning radio broadcast of the Hawaii road game. The '77 obliteration Oklahoma put on Nebraska that cost me a quarter bet to a school buddy. The '78 heartbreak against Missouri after finally getting the monkey off our backs the week before. I sat many a Saturday in the upstairs family room in front of my dad's old Telefunken, tuned into Husker football, rooting for the Big Red to win the day.

I can see it all like it happened yesterday. From the time I was 7 or 8 until my early 30's, I attended, watched on TV or listened to almost every Nebraska football game played. I'd say better than 75% of the games were radio broadcasts until the mid '80's and while I'm glad I can see them all now, I'll admit I miss the simpler times of 'Husker Football is on the air!'.

I was pissed when we had a few High School football games my junior and senior years on Saturday and not Friday night. I took the radio with me when I started working in construction and listened to the games as best I could, sometimes not so well when we were out in a field in the mountains or on the plains.

Times change and things move on, but I'll never forget those Saturday afternoons. I tried to explain it to my youngest while he studied and the '77 NU-Alabama game played in the background, but it just wasn't the same for him and isn't for his generation. They've always had video. They've always seen it, not heard it and imagined it. He'll never know what it was like to hear Lyle call a play, a score or a Husker victory. I remember it like it was last Saturday.
Thanks for the trip down memory lane! I remember listening with my father in Minnesota. This would’ve been mid 70s until moving back to Nebraska in 1984 Not sure what station or how we picked up the games but if you took the radio outside in the garage we could get a pretty good signal. I don’t remember a lot of television broadcast even in the 90s so getting that first computer and listening to the broadcast online in Alabama and Tennessee at the time seemed like a gift from God. I also found Huskerpedia sometime in the late 90s and lurked until about a year ago!
 

Power of Corn

Red Shirt
5 Year Member
Reading my mind friend, somehow i equate the games being even more exciting, because u were so attuned to that radio, you had to picture everything in your mind, you had total focus.

I fell asleep toward the end of that hawaii game, and woke up the next day thinking we had lost probably, ..

The radio was awesome, i log on now, onli.e and listen to all the pregame commercials. Wimmers hot dogs, guys potato chips, all the seed corn ads., love it
 

TnHusker87

Red Shirt
Occasionally I'll see, hear or smell something that brings back memories from the past. I'm not always blessed with perfect memories of things that happened in the last few years, sometimes not the last few days either, but I can recall with clarity that is sometimes disturbing things that are completely amazing to me from years ago.

Recently my youngest was home from school and happened to be up early Sunday morning watching an old Nebraska game on YouTube, only half paying attention while he did some homework. The game was an early season 1977 contest against Alabama. He was facing me and I couldn't see the screen on his laptop, but I could hear the audio of Keith Jackson and man did it bring back memories.

My family moved to Colorado from Nebraska in 1972. Cable TV didn't exist, so it was usually one local and one national game a weekend. That was all, so most Saturdays I listened to the Nebraska game on the radio. Coloradan's for Nebraska had some affiliation to the broadcasts that I don't think I ever really understood, but I'm quite positive I owe them a great debt for keeping me tied to Nebraska football for the decade between my arrival in enemy territory and the advent of cable TV and greatly enhanced access to Husker football. Every week I'd look through the TV guide looking for 'Nebraska' on Saturday's, usually to be disappointed except for one non conference game a year and two or three Big 8 games if I was lucky, so it was mostly radio broadcasts. I'd spend Saturday mornings making sure I'd taken care of all I needed to to be allowed to spend the three hours by the radio instead of working on something for my folks. Breakfast, chores, Nebraska football. I'd get chills running up and down my spine when I'd hear 'Nebraska Football is on the air!'

The play by play descriptions were only enhanced by my over active imagination to paint a picture I couldn't see. Lyle or his successors setting the stage, calling out the lineups, describing the formations, I lived for it all. Descriptions of their uniforms and those of the opponents, the crowd, the sky and weather, the sounds caught by the mikes that helped complete the picture were always part of my Saturdays.

Phrases like this from '76 still bounce around my memory to this day:

'Huskers in their home scarlet jerseys and cream pants in front of another sellout crowd at Memorial Stadium. NU with the football at their own 20, driving North to South, right to left, against the wind. I formation from the left hashmark, Ferragamo under center, Craig in the slot to the left, Malito split out to wide side'

The names I'll never forget. Ferragamo, Curtis Craig, Dave Butterfield, Chuck Malito, Andra Franklin, Tom Sorley, Richard Berns, Jeff Quinn, Junior Miller, Steve Damkroger, Tim Hager, IM Hipp, Jarvis Redwine and so many more. The games I recall like they were yesterday. The '76 loss to Iowa State and an early morning radio broadcast of the Hawaii road game. The '77 obliteration Oklahoma put on Nebraska that cost me a quarter bet to a school buddy. The '78 heartbreak against Missouri after finally getting the monkey off our backs the week before. I sat many a Saturday in the upstairs family room in front of my dad's old Telefunken, tuned into Husker football, rooting for the Big Red to win the day.

I can see it all like it happened yesterday. From the time I was 7 or 8 until my early 30's, I attended, watched on TV or listened to almost every Nebraska football game played. I'd say better than 75% of the games were radio broadcasts until the mid '80's and while I'm glad I can see them all now, I'll admit I miss the simpler times of 'Husker Football is on the air!'.

I was pissed when we had a few High School football games my junior and senior years on Saturday and not Friday night. I took the radio with me when I started working in construction and listened to the games as best I could, sometimes not so well when we were out in a field in the mountains or on the plains.

Times change and things move on, but I'll never forget those Saturday afternoons. I tried to explain it to my youngest while he studied and the '77 NU-Alabama game played in the background, but it just wasn't the same for him and isn't for his generation. They've always had video. They've always seen it, not heard it and imagined it. He'll never know what it was like to hear Lyle call a play, a score or a Husker victory. I remember it like it was last Saturday.
Really enjoyed that post ... would only add that when the radio broadcast was over, we would find our neighborhood friends for some touch football when playing in the street or tackle football in an empty lot & of course role play some of our favorite players of the season like Tagge, Humm, Frosty Anderson or the Tecumseh Tornado ...
 

PlanoHusker

Recruit
5 Year Member
I moved to Texas from Omaha in 1977. The North Texas Nebraskans paid to have the broadcast on a station here locally and I also listened to many of the games on the radio. I miss listening to Lyle Bremser and his "man, woman and child". He was great!
 

Farmer Jake

Recruit
Occasionally I'll see, hear or smell something that brings back memories from the past. I'm not always blessed with perfect memories of things that happened in the last few years, sometimes not the last few days either, but I can recall with clarity that is sometimes disturbing things that are completely amazing to me from years ago.

Recently my youngest was home from school and happened to be up early Sunday morning watching an old Nebraska game on YouTube, only half paying attention while he did some homework. The game was an early season 1977 contest against Alabama. He was facing me and I couldn't see the screen on his laptop, but I could hear the audio of Keith Jackson and man did it bring back memories.

My family moved to Colorado from Nebraska in 1972. Cable TV didn't exist, so it was usually one local and one national game a weekend. That was all, so most Saturdays I listened to the Nebraska game on the radio. Coloradan's for Nebraska had some affiliation to the broadcasts that I don't think I ever really understood, but I'm quite positive I owe them a great debt for keeping me tied to Nebraska football for the decade between my arrival in enemy territory and the advent of cable TV and greatly enhanced access to Husker football. Every week I'd look through the TV guide looking for 'Nebraska' on Saturday's, usually to be disappointed except for one non conference game a year and two or three Big 8 games if I was lucky, so it was mostly radio broadcasts. I'd spend Saturday mornings making sure I'd taken care of all I needed to to be allowed to spend the three hours by the radio instead of working on something for my folks. Breakfast, chores, Nebraska football. I'd get chills running up and down my spine when I'd hear 'Nebraska Football is on the air!'

The play by play descriptions were only enhanced by my over active imagination to paint a picture I couldn't see. Lyle or his successors setting the stage, calling out the lineups, describing the formations, I lived for it all. Descriptions of their uniforms and those of the opponents, the crowd, the sky and weather, the sounds caught by the mikes that helped complete the picture were always part of my Saturdays.

Phrases like this from '76 still bounce around my memory to this day:

'Huskers in their home scarlet jerseys and cream pants in front of another sellout crowd at Memorial Stadium. NU with the football at their own 20, driving North to South, right to left, against the wind. I formation from the left hashmark, Ferragamo under center, Craig in the slot to the left, Malito split out to wide side'

The names I'll never forget. Ferragamo, Curtis Craig, Dave Butterfield, Chuck Malito, Andra Franklin, Tom Sorley, Richard Berns, Jeff Quinn, Junior Miller, Steve Damkroger, Tim Hager, IM Hipp, Jarvis Redwine and so many more. The games I recall like they were yesterday. The '76 loss to Iowa State and an early morning radio broadcast of the Hawaii road game. The '77 obliteration Oklahoma put on Nebraska that cost me a quarter bet to a school buddy. The '78 heartbreak against Missouri after finally getting the monkey off our backs the week before. I sat many a Saturday in the upstairs family room in front of my dad's old Telefunken, tuned into Husker football, rooting for the Big Red to win the day.

I can see it all like it happened yesterday. From the time I was 7 or 8 until my early 30's, I attended, watched on TV or listened to almost every Nebraska football game played. I'd say better than 75% of the games were radio broadcasts until the mid '80's and while I'm glad I can see them all now, I'll admit I miss the simpler times of 'Husker Football is on the air!'.

I was pissed when we had a few High School football games my junior and senior years on Saturday and not Friday night. I took the radio with me when I started working in construction and listened to the games as best I could, sometimes not so well when we were out in a field in the mountains or on the plains.

Times change and things move on, but I'll never forget those Saturday afternoons. I tried to explain it to my youngest while he studied and the '77 NU-Alabama game played in the background, but it just wasn't the same for him and isn't for his generation. They've always had video. They've always seen it, not heard it and imagined it. He'll never know what it was like to hear Lyle call a play, a score or a Husker victory. I remember it like it was last Saturday.
I remember getting a stomach full of butterflies, waiting for the pregame show that came on at 1:00, half an hour before the 1:30 kickoff. (All home games had a standard kickoff time of 1:30, before moving to standard kickoff at 1:00. Colorado games started at 2:30 local time when played in Boulder.) Coaches used to love the standard kickoff times just to keep the players in a structured environment.

I, too, remember where I was at while listening to the transistor radio I carried with me on game days. Alabama 1977, baling alfalfa. Oklahoma 1969, building fence to turn cows out in the stalks. Penn State 1981, cleaning out a grain bin. And so on and so forth.

As for listening to the radio during the game, I truly believe all broadcasters should have to broadcast on the radio for at least 5 years before moving to video. Radio broadcasters are soooo much better than almost all of the video broadcasters. I still prefer to listen to Sharpe and Davidson while turning the volume down on the TV.

Crab, thanks for helping me take a walk down memory lane . . . .:)
 

anotherdumbprediction

Red Shirt
2 Year Member
While it is very romantical to listen on the radIo, it could also be extremely frustrating. "Sorley sends it down the right sideline. He has a man. It's Tim Smith, he's got it at the Missouri six yard line, ohhh what a throw! NO,........they're saying it's Missouri's ball! It was intercepted! The safety must have got in there and taken it away." Never could understand why the announcer wouldn't wait to know what he was saying before reporting it. It wasn't like I would have known everything was happening three seconds sooner than he was saying it. He has to realize it is life and death on the receiving end of his words, right?

You want exciting radio? Remember when they wouldn't show Indy live? "Here they come into turn three, it's Andretti with Unser and Foyt right behind zeeeaaaarrr, zeeeeaaaarrr.......zeeeeaaaarrr. Over to you in turn four Chris! Yeah, it is still Andretti with Unser and then Foyt zeeeeaaarrr, zeeeeaaarr........zeeeeaaarrr"

When our kids grow up and watch games in VR and it will be like actually being in the stadium if not on the field, they will look back at staring at a sixty inch tv in a fixed spot in the room like we remember the radio.
 

Twelve String

Scout Team
5 Year Member
Occasionally I'll see, hear or smell something that brings back memories from the past. I'm not always blessed with perfect memories of things that happened in the last few years, sometimes not the last few days either, but I can recall with clarity that is sometimes disturbing things that are completely amazing to me from years ago.

Recently my youngest was home from school and happened to be up early Sunday morning watching an old Nebraska game on YouTube, only half paying attention while he did some homework. The game was an early season 1977 contest against Alabama. He was facing me and I couldn't see the screen on his laptop, but I could hear the audio of Keith Jackson and man did it bring back memories.

My family moved to Colorado from Nebraska in 1972. Cable TV didn't exist, so it was usually one local and one national game a weekend. That was all, so most Saturdays I listened to the Nebraska game on the radio. Coloradan's for Nebraska had some affiliation to the broadcasts that I don't think I ever really understood, but I'm quite positive I owe them a great debt for keeping me tied to Nebraska football for the decade between my arrival in enemy territory and the advent of cable TV and greatly enhanced access to Husker football. Every week I'd look through the TV guide looking for 'Nebraska' on Saturday's, usually to be disappointed except for one non conference game a year and two or three Big 8 games if I was lucky, so it was mostly radio broadcasts. I'd spend Saturday mornings making sure I'd taken care of all I needed to to be allowed to spend the three hours by the radio instead of working on something for my folks. Breakfast, chores, Nebraska football. I'd get chills running up and down my spine when I'd hear 'Nebraska Football is on the air!'

The play by play descriptions were only enhanced by my over active imagination to paint a picture I couldn't see. Lyle or his successors setting the stage, calling out the lineups, describing the formations, I lived for it all. Descriptions of their uniforms and those of the opponents, the crowd, the sky and weather, the sounds caught by the mikes that helped complete the picture were always part of my Saturdays.

Phrases like this from '76 still bounce around my memory to this day:

'Huskers in their home scarlet jerseys and cream pants in front of another sellout crowd at Memorial Stadium. NU with the football at their own 20, driving North to South, right to left, against the wind. I formation from the left hashmark, Ferragamo under center, Craig in the slot to the left, Malito split out to wide side'

The names I'll never forget. Ferragamo, Curtis Craig, Dave Butterfield, Chuck Malito, Andra Franklin, Tom Sorley, Richard Berns, Jeff Quinn, Junior Miller, Steve Damkroger, Tim Hager, IM Hipp, Jarvis Redwine and so many more. The games I recall like they were yesterday. The '76 loss to Iowa State and an early morning radio broadcast of the Hawaii road game. The '77 obliteration Oklahoma put on Nebraska that cost me a quarter bet to a school buddy. The '78 heartbreak against Missouri after finally getting the monkey off our backs the week before. I sat many a Saturday in the upstairs family room in front of my dad's old Telefunken, tuned into Husker football, rooting for the Big Red to win the day.

I can see it all like it happened yesterday. From the time I was 7 or 8 until my early 30's, I attended, watched on TV or listened to almost every Nebraska football game played. I'd say better than 75% of the games were radio broadcasts until the mid '80's and while I'm glad I can see them all now, I'll admit I miss the simpler times of 'Husker Football is on the air!'.

I was pissed when we had a few High School football games my junior and senior years on Saturday and not Friday night. I took the radio with me when I started working in construction and listened to the games as best I could, sometimes not so well when we were out in a field in the mountains or on the plains.

Times change and things move on, but I'll never forget those Saturday afternoons. I tried to explain it to my youngest while he studied and the '77 NU-Alabama game played in the background, but it just wasn't the same for him and isn't for his generation. They've always had video. They've always seen it, not heard it and imagined it. He'll never know what it was like to hear Lyle call a play, a score or a Husker victory. I remember it like it was last Saturday.
Super post. I miss those radio calls too.

In the days before cable TV and cell phones I remember sitting and listening to Tom Jonson on KFAB after the game to catch all the national scores and then speculating along with with my dad and brother on where NU would be in the next AP poll.

Those were good days.
 

CrabHusker

Alienating everyone, one post at a time.
5 Year Member
Reading my mind friend, somehow i equate the games being even more exciting, because u were so attuned to that radio, you had to picture everything in your mind, you had total focus.

I fell asleep toward the end of that hawaii game, and woke up the next day thinking we had lost probably, ..

The radio was awesome, i log on now, onli.e and listen to all the pregame commercials. Wimmers hot dogs, guys potato chips, all the seed corn ads., love it
It was all in the minds eye, wasn't it?

I made it through the game, but was worthless that entire Sunday.

Lasso herbicide, Valentino's pizza, Hi Yield seeds. I haven't heard a Nebraska radio broadcast now since I had Satellite radio in one of my trucks back in '01 or '02, but it sure does bring back a lot of memories.
 

CrabHusker

Alienating everyone, one post at a time.
5 Year Member
I remember getting a stomach full of butterflies, waiting for the pregame show that came on at 1:00, half an hour before the 1:30 kickoff. (All home games had a standard kickoff time of 1:30, before moving to standard kickoff at 1:00. Colorado games started at 2:30 local time when played in Boulder.) Coaches used to love the standard kickoff times just to keep the players in a structured environment.

I, too, remember where I was at while listening to the transistor radio I carried with me on game days. Alabama 1977, baling alfalfa. Oklahoma 1969, building fence to turn cows out in the stalks. Penn State 1981, cleaning out a grain bin. And so on and so forth.

As for listening to the radio during the game, I truly believe all broadcasters should have to broadcast on the radio for at least 5 years before moving to video. Radio broadcasters are soooo much better than almost all of the video broadcasters. I still prefer to listen to Sharpe and Davidson while turning the volume down on the TV.

Crab, thanks for helping me take a walk down memory lane . . . .:)
Funny you tie the games to things you did as well.

'73 Kansas State was a fire wood cutting trip to the mountains. Had a helluva time with the signal. '77 Iowa State was building a shed at my dad's place. '78 Alabama was another trip to the mountains, this time to fish. Nebraska was up 3-0 when we lost the signal the last time and didn't find out until we got home Sunday night that they had lost. '81 Penn State was splitting firewood at my cousins place. He was a Wyoming fan and took pleasure in giving me the business about losing that game and the game two weeks before to Iowa. Lots of Saturdays at a job site forming, pouring or finishing concrete in the '80's with either the radio in my truck or a portable playing the game.

Another thing about radio....its live. No pushing the pause button to grab a beer or go to the bathroom. Timing was everything.
 

CrabHusker

Alienating everyone, one post at a time.
5 Year Member
The ‘78 Mizzou game, IIRC, I listened to on the 856’s fender-mount AM radio hauling corn or beans to town for Dad.
Double whammy. Working and having to listen to James Wilder, Kellen Winslow and Phil Bradley screw up an Orange Bowl National Championship matchup with Penn State. Hard to believe that was (gulp) 40+ years ago.
 
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