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Questions for Native and Coronavirus discussion Thread

Middle-aged_Ball_Coach

Mobutu Sese Seko Kuku Ngbendu Wa Za Banga of H-Max
2 Year Member
Oh. Should I be avoiding my civet cat coffee nowadays? You know, I pay a lot of money for that stuff. And boy, does it taste delicious.

It’s got such a rich, smoky taste.

:O O:
No, by all means, YOU should keep drinking it. You should probably get your own civet cats so that you can get a "fresher" product .
 

FeelLikeAStranger

How are ya now?
15 Year Member
Moving these here

A few Questions:

1. Does the body built antibodies to the virus or can you catch it again after you recover?
2. Is this virus expected to mutate like the seasonal flu?

3. Will this become an annual epidemic like the flu?

Probably more to come.

I’ll take a stab.

1. Yes, and maybe yes. I read that there is a small % of people in China that have been cleared and then were symptomatic with active infection later.


2. Already has mutated several times based on sequencing. It’s possible that a mutated strain could be undetected, depending on how the test is designed and/or chance. Also possible that a mutated strain could be infectious to someone who has had a different strain, which is how other viruses work-see link above.

3. Possible. Not enough known about how this novel virus is going to behave, but it looks like it. This article discusses...

 

FeelLikeAStranger

How are ya now?
15 Year Member
@Native when will they have a test available to ascertain if someone has already had the virus and have developed anti bodies?

Biomedomics has an IgM/IgG test that was CE-IVD marked recently.

 

Native

ToungeInCheek since 2010
Staff member
10 Year Member
@Native ,

The World Health Organization has said there’s no evidence that companion animals such as dogs or cats can be infected with the new coronavirus as of now.
This means that pets that were previously quarantined can now be released.

My question to you, is it okay to say "W.H.O. let the dogs out?"

Appreciate the link and hard work to set up a joke that woulda still sucked 20 years ago when the song was fresh. :D
 

Red Crawdad

Varsity
10 Year Member
Biomedomics has an IgM/IgG test that was CE-IVD marked recently.


If I understand it correctly, IgM is the initial antibody response post-infection, and is short lived, and IgG is the "memory" antibody that would enable the host to fight off subsequent infections, right?

So when researchers are looking at subsequent immunity, they would be looking for the IgG antibody? Would there be a difference in IgG levels based on the severity of symptoms?
 

Huskerwisdom

Red Shirt
2 Year Member
@CrabHusker gave a great answer, but I'm going to be a bit more blunt about it: NOTHING is off-limits as a food to the Chinese, and animals and people live together like few other places on earth. It's impossible to comprehend without going there and seeing it with your own eyes. I lived in Shenzhen, which is as ultramodern as any city in China besides Shanghai, yet I still saw animals being butchered on the sidewalks, including animals like dogs that aren't considered food in many places in the world. The restaurants that served exotic foods would advertise their offerings by displaying the live animals in cages on the sidewalks. There's so much fundamental distrust of one another that it is a cultural habit to literally kill, clean, and prepare the meat next to the table where it will be eaten, otherwise you might spend top dollar for a fresh venomous snake only to be served a dead one of a different variety. I saw toads, frogs, snakes, monkeys, you name it, all ive, waiting outside of an upscale restaurant. There are parts of China that no longer have song birds because they were all killed and eaten during Mao's Great Leap Forward. Even in small apartments in a city of 10+ million people, it was common to keep chickens or ducks in the home with you for food. Because of all of the above in combination with crowded urban conditions, the exotic food markets are rife with filth, squalor, and opportunities for cross-species infections. When a people will literally kill, keep, raise, skin, and eat anything--civet cats, marmots, foxes, bats, et al.--there will be exposure to viruses that are new.

to add to this as well. Chinese (outside of the more upscale areas) have a vastly different sense of personal space and hygiene, not just in relation to the animals they keep as pets and to eat, but also in how they deal with their own waste. My wife shudders in memory of visiting her relatives (and she was even in Taiwan) when she was young
 

Native

ToungeInCheek since 2010
Staff member
10 Year Member
Don't know if this amounts to anything, but came across this PR release just now. FDA grants Roche EUA for Covid-19 test.


(Update – realize this is from March 13th)

Just allows more platforms to do the test on. Not that hard of a test really. Basically limits are on sample collection and the supply chain. I could design a non-official one and have it up and running by the end of the week.

New like this is nice because other diagnostic companies are able to adapt their platforms. Our hospital report this morning said they were trying to get their system adapted, but between various supply and validation/approval steps it would take them over a month to come sanctioned. So a place that already running Roche stuff can get onboard way faster than that.
 

Let it be by the code

Iowa sucks!
2 Year Member
@CrabHusker gave a great answer, but I'm going to be a bit more blunt about it: NOTHING is off-limits as a food to the Chinese, and animals and people live together like few other places on earth. It's impossible to comprehend without going there and seeing it with your own eyes. I lived in Shenzhen, which is as ultramodern as any city in China besides Shanghai, yet I still saw animals being butchered on the sidewalks, including animals like dogs that aren't considered food in many places in the world. The restaurants that served exotic foods would advertise their offerings by displaying the live animals in cages on the sidewalks. There's so much fundamental distrust of one another that it is a cultural habit to literally kill, clean, and prepare the meat next to the table where it will be eaten, otherwise you might spend top dollar for a fresh venomous snake only to be served a dead one of a different variety. I saw toads, frogs, snakes, monkeys, you name it, all ive, waiting outside of an upscale restaurant. There are parts of China that no longer have song birds because they were all killed and eaten during Mao's Great Leap Forward. Even in small apartments in a city of 10+ million people, it was common to keep chickens or ducks in the home with you for food. Because of all of the above in combination with crowded urban conditions, the exotic food markets are rife with filth, squalor, and opportunities for cross-species infections. When a people will literally kill, keep, raise, skin, and eat anything--civet cats, marmots, foxes, bats, et al.--there will be exposure to viruses that are new.
for those who want to see what a wet market looks like and how the growth/spread of viruses can happen easily in one, check out this video.

 

The_CornTorch

Scout Team
5 Year Member
Just allows more platforms to do the test on. Not that hard of a test really. Basically limits are on sample collection and the supply chain. I could design a non-official one and have it up and running by the end of the week.

New like this is nice because other diagnostic companies are able to adapt their platforms. Our hospital report this morning said they were trying to get their system adapted, but between various supply and validation/approval steps it would take them over a month to come sanctioned. So a place that already running Roche stuff can get onboard way faster than that.

I heard that swans and reagents are the bottleneck. True?
 
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