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Questions for Native and Coronavirus discussion Thread

Native

ToungeInCheek since 2010
Staff member
10 Year Member
I am going to get Moderator Privileges for the other thread, so after I lock it, I'll post replies and copy questions to that thread to try and keep it a bit cleaner.

So post questions in this one.
 
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CrabHusker

Shut up and color
5 Year Member
I've read a lot recently about the potential that Covid 19 was burning it's way through China in November of last year and was likely already in the US before January. If that was the case, we're likely not seeing anywhere near accurate numbers of infected and the virus has likely spread to a much larger portion of the population than was previously expected. If that's the case, the symptoms are much more limited in a healthy individual than influenza. This is all theory at this point, but it seems to have some legs.

IF this is accurate, are we drastically overreacting to the threat? It sure looks to me that outside of a small, already compromised slice of the population, the potential for this to be terminal is limited.

Thoughts?
 
I

inthedeed

Guest
wyoming, as the natural winds would blow the coronos into western nebraska:)
 

Hugoniot

Recruit
How does a virus develop in a bat? What causes it to jump to different species or what mutations have to happen to jump species?
Why does China seem to be a breeding ground for viruses (SARS, H1N1, etc)?
 

CrabHusker

Shut up and color
5 Year Member
How does a virus develop in a bat? What causes it to jump to different species or what mutations have to happen to jump species?
Why does China seem to be a breeding ground for viruses (SARS, H1N1, etc)?

Host animals are an interesting topic. Pigs, primates, birds, I'm not sure there isn't species of animal that can't be a host and can't carry a virus that is not harmful to them but potentially fatal to another animal.

The most interesting book I've read about the subject of cross species 'jumping' of viruses is called 'Spillover', by David Quammen. It's pretty dry and technical, but interesting if this subject makes you curious. Sometimes the driver is proximity to an infected animal, sometimes it's eating 'bush meat' from an infected animal. The possibilities are really concerning and interesting at the same time.

China is a breeding ground because of a few things. Overcrowding, lack of good health, healthcare and basic sanitation in some parts of the country, mixed with the habit of eating 'exotics' that may or may not be handled, cleaned and/or cooked correctly.
 

Cyberbach

Founding Father
20 Year Member
@Native when will they have a test available to ascertain if someone has already had the virus and have developed anti bodies?
 

RedStones

Just do the right thing damnit!
5 Year Member
Moving these here

A few Questions:

1. Does the body built antibodies to the virus or can you catch it again after you recover?

2. Is this virus expected to mutate like the seasonal flu?

3. Will this become an annual epidemic like the flu?

Probably more to come.
 

Red Crawdad

Varsity
10 Year Member
Native, maybe go into detail about social distancing. People hear "flatten the curve", but may not understand that. I like this link:

Also, can you detail the timeline process of finding a vaccine, clinical trials, and commercial release?
 

Middle-aged_Ball_Coach

Mobutu Sese Seko Kuku Ngbendu Wa Za Banga of H-Max
2 Year Member
How does a virus develop in a bat? What causes it to jump to different species or what mutations have to happen to jump species?
Why does China seem to be a breeding ground for viruses (SARS, H1N1, etc)?
@CrabHusker gave a great answer, but I'm going to be a bit more blunt about it: NOTHING is off-limits as a food to the Chinese, and animals and people live together like few other places on earth. It's impossible to comprehend without going there and seeing it with your own eyes. I lived in Shenzhen, which is as ultramodern as any city in China besides Shanghai, yet I still saw animals being butchered on the sidewalks, including animals like dogs that aren't considered food in many places in the world. The restaurants that served exotic foods would advertise their offerings by displaying the live animals in cages on the sidewalks. There's so much fundamental distrust of one another that it is a cultural habit to literally kill, clean, and prepare the meat next to the table where it will be eaten, otherwise you might spend top dollar for a fresh venomous snake only to be served a dead one of a different variety. I saw toads, frogs, snakes, monkeys, you name it, all ive, waiting outside of an upscale restaurant. There are parts of China that no longer have song birds because they were all killed and eaten during Mao's Great Leap Forward. Even in small apartments in a city of 10+ million people, it was common to keep chickens or ducks in the home with you for food. Because of all of the above in combination with crowded urban conditions, the exotic food markets are rife with filth, squalor, and opportunities for cross-species infections. When a people will literally kill, keep, raise, skin, and eat anything--civet cats, marmots, foxes, bats, et al.--there will be exposure to viruses that are new.
 
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The_CornTorch

Scout Team
5 Year Member
@CrabHusker gave a great answer, but I'm going to be a bit more blunt about it: NOTHING is off-limits as a food to the Chinese, and animals and people live together like few other places on earth. It's impossible to comprehend without going there and seeing it with your own eyes. I lived in Shenzhen, which is as ultramodern as any city in China besides Shanghai, yet I still saw animals being butchered on the sidewalks, including animals like dogs that aren't considered food in many places in the world. The restaurants that served exotic foods would advertise their offerings by displaying the live animals in cages on the sidewalks. There's so much fundamental distrust of one another that it is a cultural habit to literally kill, clean, and prepare the meat next to the table where it will be eaten, otherwise you might spend top dollar for a fresh venomous snake only to be served a dead one of a different variety. I saw toads, frogs, snakes, monkeys, you name it, all ive, waiting outside of an upscale restaurant. There are parts of China that no longer have song birds because they were all killed and eaten during Mao's Great Leap Forward. Even in small apartments in a city of 10+ million people, it was common to keep chickens or ducks in the home with you for food. Because of all of the above in combination with crowded urban conditions, the exotic food markets are rife with filth, squalor, and opportunities for cross-species infections. When a people will literally kill, keep, raise, skin, and eat anything--civet cats, marmots, foxes, bats, et al.--there will be exposure to viruses that are new.

Oh. Should I be avoiding my civet cat coffee nowadays? You know, I pay a lot of money for that stuff. And boy, does it taste delicious.

It’s got such a rich, smoky taste.

:O O:
 
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