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Question?

MiniDisk

Run game... Whats that?
2 Year Member
What happens to college football when the XFL, whom the NFL is somewhat behind, starts signing the best HS players for a million or so per year? I’m hearing things about them doing as much. Will college football get the leftover scraps? Will college football die? Ryan Day says he needs 13 million just to keep his roster in tact, for one season. This is bad, bad for everyone who loves college football. Looks like it’s headed for a slow death. Any thoughts?
i have yet to watch any non-nfl pro game for more than a few minutes. just have no interest to watch football in spring/summer months. fans are where the money is, so as long has these minor football leagues flounders with fans, college is likely safe. if theres no fans watching the non-nfl games, advertisers wont jump on leading to not enough money flowing to the minor league nfl to make it a viable option for players. im sure some will try, but i would not think its gonna be very successful. college teams have brand recognition and built in fan bases. that will be extremely difficult to over come for these startup leagues to get going.
 

Husker In Oklahoma

All American
15 Year Member
i have yet to watch any non-nfl pro game for more than a few minutes. just have no interest to watch football in spring/summer months. fans are where the money is, so as long has these minor football leagues flounders with fans, college is likely safe. if theres no fans watching the non-nfl games, advertisers wont jump on leading to not enough money flowing to the minor league nfl to make it a viable option for players. im sure some will try, but i would not think its gonna be very successful. college teams have brand recognition and built in fan bases. that will be extremely difficult to over come for these startup leagues to get going.
You could be right, that’s why I asked. In this case, the NFL is behind it, to a degree, which ‘could’ change things a bit. College football is not in a good place right now. People are being turned off by what’s happening daily. We will see how it all plays out. Going to take some time to shake out, however it goes. Money talks, even for kids.
 

weaver75

Special Counsel
5 Year Member
I think if the coaches had not been permitted unlimited money, the plight of the student athlete would not have seemed so unfair. For decades now football coaches at state universities have been the highest paid public employee in nearly every state, and the academy coaches are the highest paid employees of the United States government (sorry Dr. Fauci). And that is just the public monies before all the private deals. If you are going to pay coaches 50 times the salaries of talented faculty and administrators, and not limit outside money to them, the call to share money with the athletes is overwhelming.
 

Mr.Bennett

Recruit
2 Year Member
Honest question... what is the purpose of Amateurism in sport? Should I actually care who is classified as an amateur vs professional in sports? Yeah, it matter for the local bowling league and golf scramble... but when I sit down on the couch to watch a game, why should I care if the guy is being paid or not? Especially if the "amateur" athlete works out, practices, and studies like the pro.

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wcbsas

All Big 10
15 Year Member
I think if the coaches had not been permitted unlimited money, the plight of the student athlete would not have seemed so unfair. For decades now football coaches at state universities have been the highest paid public employee in nearly every state, and the academy coaches are the highest paid employees of the United States government (sorry Dr. Fauci). And that is just the public monies before all the private deals. If you are going to pay coaches 50 times the salaries of talented faculty and administrators, and not limit outside money to them, the call to share money with the athletes is overwhelming.
This is faulty thinking in my opinion.

Nick Saban has done more for the profile and overall success of Alabama than any 10 professors at that university. Alabama is willing to pay him the money because his success means increased enrollment, increased media profile, increase in endowment giving and ultimately greatly improved the entire profile of the university as a whole.

There are a reason why CEO's and elite football coaches get paid because their success means greatly increased benefits for everyone around them.

College athletics is a multi-billion dollar enterprise. Highlighting coaches salaries as the lightning rod is silly as the Nick Saban's of the world are an extremely small group and their salaries as an aggregate are an extremely small part of the whole financial picture. Having said that - highlighting coaches salaries - is an easy and lazy argument that can be exploited by people debating the issue.

The top 50 head coaches in 2019 were making $3.0M+ but guys like Herm Edwards, Kevin Sumlin, Brian Kelly were making roughly $2M. Craig Bohl at Wyoming was making $1.4M.


The vast majority of tenured college professors and administrators are doing very well from a comp perspective. No tears shed for them!

I do think CFB coaching salaries are extreme but we fans are a big part of the problem ... we want immediate success, we support administrators willing to make changes and we've made the coaching profession a short lived one. I would love for collegiate professors to have their employment based on such performance standards and their continued employment based on the whims of administrators, boosters and fans.
 

weaver75

Special Counsel
5 Year Member
This is faulty thinking in my opinion.

Nick Saban has done more for the profile and overall success of Alabama than any 10 professors at that university. Alabama is willing to pay him the money because his success means increased enrollment, increased media profile, increase in endowment giving and ultimately greatly improved the entire profile of the university as a whole.

There are a reason why CEO's and elite football coaches get paid because their success means greatly increased benefits for everyone around them.

College athletics is a multi-billion dollar enterprise. Highlighting coaches salaries as the lightning rod is silly as the Nick Saban's of the world are an extremely small group and their salaries as an aggregate are an extremely small part of the whole financial picture. Having said that - highlighting coaches salaries - is an easy and lazy argument that can be exploited by people debating the issue.

The top 50 head coaches in 2019 were making $3.0M+ but guys like Herm Edwards, Kevin Sumlin, Brian Kelly were making roughly $2M. Craig Bohl at Wyoming was making $1.4M.


The vast majority of tenured college professors and administrators are doing very well from a comp perspective. No tears shed for them!

I do think CFB coaching salaries are extreme but we fans are a big part of the problem ... we want immediate success, we support administrators willing to make changes and we've made the coaching profession a short lived one. I would love for collegiate professors to have their employment based on such performance standards and their continued employment based on the whims of administrators, boosters and fans.
Just to be clear, I wasn’t complaining about college coaches salaries so much as saying what the logical outcome is. When coaches make as much as they do (and Brian Kelly jumped from that $2M to $9+M) and universities make many tens of millions of dollars per year on the sport, it is not surprising that we have reached the point of having the players share the wealth. That is, people begin to acknowledge that Saben’s players have something to do with the success you mention. If we didn’t want college football to be a semi-pro model, maybe we should have thought about what happens when paying college coaches salaries equal to and even above their professional counterparts.

(And, off the topic, but I think there are many generals and admirals in the DOD that should be better paid than academy football coaches. All our lives depend on the formers’ performance.)
 

WestTexasHusker

Blackshirt
10 Year Member
I don't know that it makes any difference really. College football will always be college football. College baseball is doing quite well, while many high school players are forgoing college to get drafted and sign minor league contracts.

I just watched a player last night in AA ball, Corbin Carroll, who had committed to UCLA, but the Diamondbacks offered him $3.8 million to go straight to their minor league system. Not a big deal.

College football will be fine. My main concern is the future co-mingling of "pro" teams such as Texas and A&M, with pure college programs. That won't be that fun. Everyone needs to decide if they're fish or foul and go down the road.
 
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wcbsas

All Big 10
15 Year Member
Just to be clear, I wasn’t complaining about college coaches salaries so much as saying what the logical outcome is. When coaches make as much as they do (and Brian Kelly jumped from that $2M to $9+M) and universities make many tens of millions of dollars per year on the sport, it is not surprising that we have reached the point of having the players share the wealth. That is, people begin to acknowledge that Saben’s players have something to do with the success you mention. If we didn’t want college football to be a semi-pro model, maybe we should have thought about what happens when paying college coaches salaries equal to and even above their professional counterparts.

(And, off the topic, but I think there are many generals and admirals in the DOD that should be better paid than academy football coaches. All our lives depend on the formers’ performance.)
The top 50 coaches in 2019 make roughly $200M.

tOSU estimates they’ll need $30M in NIL money. Extrapolating that means the top 50 teams will need somewhere in excess of $1B in NIL money. It’s silly money … it really is.

You said it again in your post “universities make many tens of millions of dollars per year on the sport”. The money “made” supports dozens of non-revenue sports and jobs … not just for Nick Saban but for trainers, therapists, equipment, field, ticketing, media, marketing and other personnel. Most athletic departments operate in the red.

If generals, admirals, professors and other people of similar ilk had the short life span most coaches have then compensation might be different. Is Nick Sabans salary excessive sure … it might be the lightning rod of these discussions … but it certainly isn’t top of the list as to what really ails college athletic.
 

NU_Alum

Husker Fan
5 Year Member
There will never be the fan support for the XFL that there is for CFB and thus, the XFL cannot sustain high salaries.

I don't see people turning out in large numbers, watching/buying jerseys. It's possible in 20-30 years they could build a following but I'm skeptical. Even if they do, CFB will still exist and it will simply return to its far more amateur roots.
 

70county

Red Shirt
15 Year Member
Football as a whole is in trouble. It will be a completely different game, or gone in 25 years…(or less, you can argue it already is a different game). The big and powerful NFL is already showing signs of succumbing to the detractors. But make no mistake, the NFL will not be the route of attack. It will be high school and lower levels, with decreasing funds, that will be hit hard and suffocated to the point of submission by naysayers that want the sport gone.
colleges will have few remaining perspective athletes to keep away from any start up leagues.
 

HuskerSuperGenius

Red Shirt
5 Year Member
Within 10 years the college football scene will be three levels:

Level 1: 20-30 teams that can raise 20-40 million in NIL to pay players to compete at a high enough level to make to college football play offs on some frequency.

Level 2: 15-20 teams that can raise 10 million or so in NIL to compete well enough to play in mid level conference and play for that conference championship, go to a non News Years day bowl game.

Level 3: Everyone else. Raise what money they can for NIL, playing in their conferences, similar to North Dakota State or Northern Iowa now.

The economy will not support the current amount of money being put into college sports, probably not into the NFL either. There will in the next 10 years be an abrupt and severe decrease in available discretionary funding from fans, donors, businesses for these activities (see $5-8 dollar a gallon gasoline, markedly lower stock market).
 
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