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Program Identity...coach or player(s)?

FeelLikeAStranger

Keeping it Brockmire
15 Year Member
Being mostly new to Nebraska Basketball, I have a question about program identity and how it is viewed. Context...I essentially became a college basketball fan at ISU, watching Fred Hoiberg for 4 years.

A friend, UNL alum, and I went to a game in Hilton and he was shocked by the whole Johnny Orr as the dominant face of the program, the Tonight Show Theme play-in with a clear focus on the head coach. He thought it was strange that the players weren’t the focus. Johnny Orr was the face of that program and was the architect of most of their success at the time.

So, remembering that tidbit, it seems like the “celebrity” coach might be a fairly foreign concept in this program. Nebraska’s essentially never had a “name” coach of any kind until now, even in the 25-ish years since then. Fred isn’t flashy or folksy like Johnny was. But, Fred is drawing serious coin and with that, attention.

How has Nebraska typically viewed the identity of the program, based on the top players of a particular year or era? Recently, PBA?

Does this hire represent/require a real or perceived mental shift for the fanbase?
 

Rainbow Dash

Embrace yourself.
2 Year Member
Yeah, Danny Nee was definitely the face of the program in the 1990’s. He had a larger-than-life personality, which is what made the Big 8 so great back then because there were some epic coaches with huge personalities. Norm, Johnny, etc. I would say Nee was a celebrity in Lincoln but nowhere else really. You are right, Hoiberg is a different mold though considering the entire country knows him. If he gets the ball rolling here, it’s going to be cult-like.
 

Cyberbach

Founding Father
15 Year Member
Does this hire represent/require a real or perceived mental shift for the fanbase?

Absofuklintutely!!!!!!:cool:
 
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RedinIowa

3 star walk on
5 Year Member
College basketball is and always will be a coaches league. Nebraska has been identified by our coaches (probably fairly).
 

LarstheRed

Junior Varsity
5 Year Member
Who is the highest profile player in college basketball today? I’d suggest it’s Zion, but even he takes a back seat to Coach K. College basketball celebrates players, but their short tenure makes them secondary to the coaches, who are the face of the program. Just my opinion.
 

Native

ToungeInCheek since 2010
5 Year Member
Being mostly new to Nebraska Basketball, I have a question about program identity and how it is viewed. Context...I essentially became a college basketball fan at ISU, watching Fred Hoiberg for 4 years.

A friend, UNL alum, and I went to a game in Hilton and he was shocked by the whole Johnny Orr as the dominant face of the program, the Tonight Show Theme play-in with a clear focus on the head coach. He thought it was strange that the players weren’t the focus. Johnny Orr was the face of that program and was the architect of most of their success at the time.

So, remembering that tidbit, it seems like the “celebrity” coach might be a fairly foreign concept in this program. Nebraska’s essentially never had a “name” coach of any kind until now, even in the 25-ish years since then. Fred isn’t flashy or folksy like Johnny was. But, Fred is drawing serious coin and with that, attention.

How has Nebraska typically viewed the identity of the program, based on the top players of a particular year or era? Recently, PBA?

Does this hire represent/require a real or perceived mental shift for the fanbase?
Program Identity: Mid major play without the mid major success story. #Nebrasketball


Identity of the program as viewed by the conference we are in:
1. A team that we should beat.
2. Team that we will blow out or a hard fought victory.
3. A team that will never blow us out.​
 

HuSkaBob

Husker Geek
5 Year Member
I think that you meant to say "Danny fuk'n Nee was fuk'n definitely the fuk'n face of the fuk'n program in the fuk'n 1990’s. Fuk! He fuk'n had a fuk'n larger-than-fuk'n-life fuk'n personality." That's more his vernacular.
Yeah, you nailed it. He had intense PTSD before people knew what it really was - surprising that he became as successful as he did. He was great for a quote or a random rage-filled rant. I heard that he broke the confidence of at least one point guard with that.
 
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