• You do not need to register if you are not going to pay the yearly fee to post. If you register please click here or log in go to "settings" then "my account" then "User Upgrades" and you can renew.

HuskerMax readers can save 50% on  Omaha Steaks .

NIL Guide

DuckTownHusker

Blackshirt Sith Lord
10 Year Member
It's the wild west out there, but below are some really comprehensive guides I've found on NIL. I'll also summarize some of the major points below.

There's a lot of speculation and misinformation swirling around NIL (such as schools paying players directly), so I thought I'd create a thread to just review all the facts.

Also note that the idea of "players as employees" may be forthcoming. If the B1G+SEC decide to just break away from the NCAA entirely and form an NFL Jr. League, it might just evolve to the point where players simply are paid by the team, just like NFL contracts.

But for now, here's NIL.



What is NIL?
NIL simply means that a student athlete (or anyone, really) can profit off their "right of publicity" which consists of their Name, Image, and/or Likeness. In essence, a student athlete can get paid for someone licensing their "persona" in the same way actors or celebrities get compensated for their likeness. You can't make a TV commercial using a digital likeness of Tom Cruise without paying him a royalty or licensing fee for using his likeness. Same principle here.

For college athletics, this also means that the university is NOT directly paying the player (yet). Someone like Dylan Raiola isn't getting an NIL deal from "Nebraska," he's getting an NIL deal from some corporation, business, private donor, or NIL Collective who are basically "employing" him to make public appearances or sign autographs. On paper, they are doing this because "Dylan is a famous dude," but of course, we all know the reason behind the reason is that he plays QB for NU.

Examples of what athletes can be compensated for include (but are not limited to):
  • Autographs and memorabilia
  • Camps and clinics
  • Personal appearances
  • Merchandise
  • Affiliate/ambassador roles
  • NFTs
  • Blogging
  • Podcasting
  • Public Speaking
  • Music, art, etc.

What is the NCAA's NIL Policy?
  1. Athletes can engage in NIL activities if they follow their state’s laws where their school is located. Schools must ensure these activities comply with state law.
  2. Athletes in states without NIL laws can still participate in NIL activities without breaking NCAA rules.
  3. Athletes are allowed to seek professional service providers for their NIL activities.

Are there any NCAA NIL restrictions?
  • An NIL agreement may not be based on a quid pro quo. (No bounties. Can't earn a bonus-per-touchdown, etc)
  • NIL compensation is contingent upon enrollment at a particular school.
  • Athletic performance may enhance a student athlete’s value, but athletic performance may not be the “consideration” for NIL compensation. (Again, no bounty system)
  • Institutions may not provide compensation in exchange for the use of student-athlete’s name, image, or likeness. (Can't pay a player for his face appearing on a football program)
  • Institutions are prohibited from engaging in pay-for-play or improper recruiting inducements. (Again, again, no bounties. The NCAA is reaaaaally stressing this point)

Note that NIL laws vary state-by-state. There have also been SCOTUS rulings on this issue. Basically, it's an unfolding drama at the moment. The links above have charts pointing to the varying NIL laws across the country. Prospective athletes will need to consider which states may offer most advantageous legal conditions for earning NIL money.

Most relevant to this conversation will obviously be NIL Laws in the State of Nebraska, since they govern what UNL athletes can and cannot do. In 2020, the Nebraska Legislature adopted LB 962, the “Nebraska Fair Pay to Play Act.” The Act further allows collegiate athletes in Nebraska to be compensated for NIL and have the ability to sign with an agent licensed in the state of Nebraska. There's not much else to the law beyond that, but safe to assume that also means money earned through NIL deals is subject to Nebraska State Income Tax (Federal too, obviously).

More on Nebraska's NIL Laws

One interesting wrinkle is around high school athletes.
Nebraska (and many other states) allow for high school athletes to earn NIL money. This opens up the potential of leveraging NIL as a recruiting tactic. While the schools themselves cannot legally be involved in NIL deals, it's very possible (and very probable) than an NIL Collective could begin offering an NIL deal to a highly rated high school prospect with the undertones that signing with the college team would increase or lengthen their payout.

This gets into that morally gray area where nobody can directly promise an athlete these terms on paper, but you know these handshake deals are happening all the time.

In effect, a Husker NIL Collective could entice a high school QB with a one-year, $50k deal, with the implication that if he signs with Nebraska that they will up his deal to $100k as a freshman or perhaps extend the contract into a multi-year payout. The legal loophole here is simply, "well, he's a college kid now so we decided to have him make 5 more appearances at banquet dinners." It's technically not tied to any on-field performance, but clearly, that's what's happening behind the scenes at every college and with every NIL Collective.

The States in red actively prohibit high school NIL deals, so this effectively screws over kids living in Arizona, Missouri, Ohio, Florida, etc. However, I also imagine there's a nifty loophole where a forward-thinking kid could easily setup an out-of-state LLC and payments are simply held with that corporation until he transfers residency. In other words, a hotshot recruit from Arizona could set up his own NIL LLC in the State of Oklahoma, earn a bunch of NIL money as a high school senior (which goes into that OK LLC, not Arizona), and then once he moves TO Oklahoma to play as a Sooner, he simply changes residency, and is "elected" CEO / partner of that LLC.

Again, loopholes abound. If you're a big time recruit, get an agent and a lawyer ASAP.

state-by-state-policies-for-high-school-student-athletes-1024x642.jpg



Also, it's worth noting that certain universities have drafted their own policies. I know off hand that in-state, UNL, Doane, and Nebraska-Wesleyan have their own NIL Policies, although the information online was a bit spotty as to the contents OF those policies. However, it's safe to assume that these policies cannot contradict either a governing body (NCAA, NAIA), nor various State and Federal Law. From what I've seen, this usually means that the school places some extra restrictions around the student athlete profiting off business ventures that involve gambling, drug and alcohol use, adult/sex content, and so forth. Makes sense that you wouldn't want a 19-year old QB profiting off a sports gambling website, since he may be underage for local gambling laws and you're basically crossing into Pete Rose territory.
 
Last edited:

It changed collegiate sports. And not for the better. But sports fans like myself tend to be naive and think the athletes are one of us. That they are huskers (in our case), that they play for Good 'Ol Nebraska U. On the other hand most of us pursue our own lives wanting, needing to make as much money as possible yet we look at the athletes as something different. It is greed. Universities see the ridiculous amount of money college sports bring in and salivate. Give a kid a scholarship, lay a bunch of rules on him or her that are impossible to live with then sit back and rake in the money.

Good for the athletes. Their window of opportunity is pretty short. Injuries, eroding skills, lots of competition means they can only thrive on NIL for a short time. They must take advantage when they can. But the NCAA has taken a lot for granted. They have some illusion they are still in charge when the fact is they aren't. The athletes will continue to push the envelope taking away power from the NCAA. The previous post mentions consideration several times and that is one concept that seems to be missing. The athletes get all of the money but really do not have to do anything for it except show up. Their paycheck isn't tied to performance so consequently we have a literal free-for-all. They transfer and transfer with no goal other than to increase their street value. Scholarship money isn't insignificant and that goes to waste as they stay at an institution for a year or two then move on. It used to be that scholarship money had an actual purpose. An institution saw a student or athlete (or both hopefully) and awarded the scholarship with the idea that the student would go on to do great things in life using the education provided by the school. It is a marketing deal at its basic form. The public sees the alum doing great things and over their shoulder is a diploma with the schools logo on it. A simple concept but a worthy one.

Now we have created another level of professional sports with the one thing missing being actual performance. In order for this whole idea to survive we must start treating the athletes like professionals. The NFL pays handsomely but at least they bind a player to a team for a set period of years. Universities don't and that is the Achilles heel of the whole thing. The NCAA keeps making rules in hopes they can stay in charge but right now the athletes are and no NCAA executive will win going up against a collection of talented athletes. The only way to get it under control is to bind the athletes to teams legally and get the NCAA out of it.

And another thing...if you want star players to participate in bowl games, let them share in the profits the universities rake in.
 
It's the wild west out there, but below are some really comprehensive guides I've found on NIL. I'll also summarize some of the major points below.

There's a lot of speculation and misinformation swirling around NIL (such as schools paying players directly), so I thought I'd create a thread to just review all the facts.

Also note that the idea of "players as employees" may be forthcoming. If the B1G+SEC decide to just break away from the NCAA entirely and form an NFL Jr. League, it might just evolve to the point where players simply are paid by the team, just like NFL contracts.

But for now, here's NIL.



What is NIL?
NIL simply means that a student athlete (or anyone, really) can profit off their "right of publicity" which consists of their Name, Image, and/or Likeness. In essence, a student athlete can get paid for someone licensing their "persona" in the same way actors or celebrities get compensated for their likeness. You can't make a TV commercial using a digital likeness of Tom Cruise without paying him a royalty or licensing fee for using his likeness. Same principle here.

For college athletics, this also means that the university is NOT directly paying the player (yet). Someone like Dylan Raiola isn't getting an NIL deal from "Nebraska," he's getting an NIL deal from some corporation, business, private donor, or NIL Collective who are basically "employing" him to make public appearances or sign autographs. On paper, they are doing this because "Dylan is a famous dude," but of course, we all know the reason behind the reason is that he plays QB for NU.

Examples of what athletes can be compensated for include (but are not limited to):
  • Autographs and memorabilia
  • Camps and clinics
  • Personal appearances
  • Merchandise
  • Affiliate/ambassador roles
  • NFTs
  • Blogging
  • Podcasting
  • Public Speaking
  • Music, art, etc.

What is the NCAA's NIL Policy?
  1. Athletes can engage in NIL activities if they follow their state’s laws where their school is located. Schools must ensure these activities comply with state law.
  2. Athletes in states without NIL laws can still participate in NIL activities without breaking NCAA rules.
  3. Athletes are allowed to seek professional service providers for their NIL activities.

Are there any NCAA NIL restrictions?
  • An NIL agreement may not be based on a quid pro quo. (No bounties. Can't earn a bonus-per-touchdown, etc)
  • NIL compensation is contingent upon enrollment at a particular school.
  • Athletic performance may enhance a student athlete’s value, but athletic performance may not be the “consideration” for NIL compensation. (Again, no bounty system)
  • Institutions may not provide compensation in exchange for the use of student-athlete’s name, image, or likeness. (Can't pay a player for his face appearing on a football program)
  • Institutions are prohibited from engaging in pay-for-play or improper recruiting inducements. (Again, again, no bounties. The NCAA is reaaaaally stressing this point)

Note that NIL laws vary state-by-state. There have also been SCOTUS rulings on this issue. Basically, it's an unfolding drama at the moment. The links above have charts pointing to the varying NIL laws across the country. Prospective athletes will need to consider which states may offer most advantageous legal conditions for earning NIL money.

Most relevant to this conversation will obviously be NIL Laws in the State of Nebraska, since they govern what UNL athletes can and cannot do. In 2020, the Nebraska Legislature adopted LB 962, the “Nebraska Fair Pay to Play Act.” The Act further allows collegiate athletes in Nebraska to be compensated for NIL and have the ability to sign with an agent licensed in the state of Nebraska. There's not much else to the law beyond that, but safe to assume that also means money earned through NIL deals is subject to Nebraska State Income Tax (Federal too, obviously).

More on Nebraska's NIL Laws

One interesting wrinkle is around high school athletes.
Nebraska (and many other states) allow for high school athletes to earn NIL money. This opens up the potential of leveraging NIL as a recruiting tactic. While the schools themselves cannot legally be involved in NIL deals, it's very possible (and very probable) than an NIL Collective could begin offering an NIL deal to a highly rated high school prospect with the undertones that signing with the college team would increase or lengthen their payout.

This gets into that morally gray area where nobody can directly promise an athlete these terms on paper, but you know these handshake deals are happening all the time.

In effect, a Husker NIL Collective could entice a high school QB with a one-year, $50k deal, with the implication that if he signs with Nebraska that they will up his deal to $100k as a freshman or perhaps extend the contract into a multi-year payout. The legal loophole here is simply, "well, he's a college kid now so we decided to have him make 5 more appearances at banquet dinners." It's technically not tied to any on-field performance, but clearly, that's what's happening behind the scenes at every college and with every NIL Collective.

The States in red actively prohibit high school NIL deals, so this effectively screws over kids living in Arizona, Missouri, Ohio, Florida, etc. However, I also imagine there's a nifty loophole where a forward-thinking kid could easily setup an out-of-state LLC and payments are simply held with that corporation until he transfers residency. In other words, a hotshot recruit from Arizona could set up his own NIL LLC in the State of Oklahoma, earn a bunch of NIL money as a high school senior (which goes into that OK LLC, not Arizona), and then once he moves TO Oklahoma to play as a Sooner, he simply changes residency, and is "elected" CEO / partner of that LLC.

Again, loopholes abound. If you're a big time recruit, get an agent and a lawyer ASAP.

state-by-state-policies-for-high-school-student-athletes-1024x642.jpg



Also, it's worth noting that certain universities have drafted their own policies. I know off hand that in-state, UNL, Doane, and Nebraska-Wesleyan have their own NIL Policies, although the information online was a bit spotty as to the contents OF those policies. However, it's safe to assume that these policies cannot contradict either a governing body (NCAA, NAIA), nor various State and Federal Law. From what I've seen, this usually means that the school places some extra restrictions around the student athlete profiting off business ventures that involve gambling, drug and alcohol use, adult/sex content, and so forth. Makes sense that you wouldn't want a 19-year old QB profiting off a sports gambling website, since he may be underage for local gambling laws and you're basically crossing into Pete Rose territory.
Very good write up that should help eliminate some confusion for fans. There are definitely loop holes that go found in this process right from the get go. Explains why there is a need for some further legislation. Not only from the standpoint of competitive balance, but also in an effort to protect athletes.
 
It's the wild west out there, but below are some really comprehensive guides I've found on NIL. I'll also summarize some of the major points below.

There's a lot of speculation and misinformation swirling around NIL (such as schools paying players directly), so I thought I'd create a thread to just review all the facts.

Also note that the idea of "players as employees" may be forthcoming. If the B1G+SEC decide to just break away from the NCAA entirely and form an NFL Jr. League, it might just evolve to the point where players simply are paid by the team, just like NFL contracts.

But for now, here's NIL.



What is NIL?
NIL simply means that a student athlete (or anyone, really) can profit off their "right of publicity" which consists of their Name, Image, and/or Likeness. In essence, a student athlete can get paid for someone licensing their "persona" in the same way actors or celebrities get compensated for their likeness. You can't make a TV commercial using a digital likeness of Tom Cruise without paying him a royalty or licensing fee for using his likeness. Same principle here.

For college athletics, this also means that the university is NOT directly paying the player (yet). Someone like Dylan Raiola isn't getting an NIL deal from "Nebraska," he's getting an NIL deal from some corporation, business, private donor, or NIL Collective who are basically "employing" him to make public appearances or sign autographs. On paper, they are doing this because "Dylan is a famous dude," but of course, we all know the reason behind the reason is that he plays QB for NU.

Examples of what athletes can be compensated for include (but are not limited to):
  • Autographs and memorabilia
  • Camps and clinics
  • Personal appearances
  • Merchandise
  • Affiliate/ambassador roles
  • NFTs
  • Blogging
  • Podcasting
  • Public Speaking
  • Music, art, etc.

What is the NCAA's NIL Policy?
  1. Athletes can engage in NIL activities if they follow their state’s laws where their school is located. Schools must ensure these activities comply with state law.
  2. Athletes in states without NIL laws can still participate in NIL activities without breaking NCAA rules.
  3. Athletes are allowed to seek professional service providers for their NIL activities.

Are there any NCAA NIL restrictions?
  • An NIL agreement may not be based on a quid pro quo. (No bounties. Can't earn a bonus-per-touchdown, etc)
  • NIL compensation is contingent upon enrollment at a particular school.
  • Athletic performance may enhance a student athlete’s value, but athletic performance may not be the “consideration” for NIL compensation. (Again, no bounty system)
  • Institutions may not provide compensation in exchange for the use of student-athlete’s name, image, or likeness. (Can't pay a player for his face appearing on a football program)
  • Institutions are prohibited from engaging in pay-for-play or improper recruiting inducements. (Again, again, no bounties. The NCAA is reaaaaally stressing this point)

Note that NIL laws vary state-by-state. There have also been SCOTUS rulings on this issue. Basically, it's an unfolding drama at the moment. The links above have charts pointing to the varying NIL laws across the country. Prospective athletes will need to consider which states may offer most advantageous legal conditions for earning NIL money.

Most relevant to this conversation will obviously be NIL Laws in the State of Nebraska, since they govern what UNL athletes can and cannot do. In 2020, the Nebraska Legislature adopted LB 962, the “Nebraska Fair Pay to Play Act.” The Act further allows collegiate athletes in Nebraska to be compensated for NIL and have the ability to sign with an agent licensed in the state of Nebraska. There's not much else to the law beyond that, but safe to assume that also means money earned through NIL deals is subject to Nebraska State Income Tax (Federal too, obviously).

More on Nebraska's NIL Laws

One interesting wrinkle is around high school athletes.
Nebraska (and many other states) allow for high school athletes to earn NIL money. This opens up the potential of leveraging NIL as a recruiting tactic. While the schools themselves cannot legally be involved in NIL deals, it's very possible (and very probable) than an NIL Collective could begin offering an NIL deal to a highly rated high school prospect with the undertones that signing with the college team would increase or lengthen their payout.

This gets into that morally gray area where nobody can directly promise an athlete these terms on paper, but you know these handshake deals are happening all the time.

In effect, a Husker NIL Collective could entice a high school QB with a one-year, $50k deal, with the implication that if he signs with Nebraska that they will up his deal to $100k as a freshman or perhaps extend the contract into a multi-year payout. The legal loophole here is simply, "well, he's a college kid now so we decided to have him make 5 more appearances at banquet dinners." It's technically not tied to any on-field performance, but clearly, that's what's happening behind the scenes at every college and with every NIL Collective.

The States in red actively prohibit high school NIL deals, so this effectively screws over kids living in Arizona, Missouri, Ohio, Florida, etc. However, I also imagine there's a nifty loophole where a forward-thinking kid could easily setup an out-of-state LLC and payments are simply held with that corporation until he transfers residency. In other words, a hotshot recruit from Arizona could set up his own NIL LLC in the State of Oklahoma, earn a bunch of NIL money as a high school senior (which goes into that OK LLC, not Arizona), and then once he moves TO Oklahoma to play as a Sooner, he simply changes residency, and is "elected" CEO / partner of that LLC.

Again, loopholes abound. If you're a big time recruit, get an agent and a lawyer ASAP.

state-by-state-policies-for-high-school-student-athletes-1024x642.jpg



Also, it's worth noting that certain universities have drafted their own policies. I know off hand that in-state, UNL, Doane, and Nebraska-Wesleyan have their own NIL Policies, although the information online was a bit spotty as to the contents OF those policies. However, it's safe to assume that these policies cannot contradict either a governing body (NCAA, NAIA), nor various State and Federal Law. From what I've seen, this usually means that the school places some extra restrictions around the student athlete profiting off business ventures that involve gambling, drug and alcohol use, adult/sex content, and so forth. Makes sense that you wouldn't want a 19-year old QB profiting off a sports gambling website, since he may be underage for local gambling laws and you're basically crossing into Pete Rose territory.
I see this as your boss saying if you continue this production level you can earn x amount.
Until its done, it isn't done and business as usual.
 



It changed collegiate sports. And not for the better. But sports fans like myself tend to be naive and think the athletes are one of us. That they are huskers (in our case), that they play for Good 'Ol Nebraska U. On the other hand most of us pursue our own lives wanting, needing to make as much money as possible yet we look at the athletes as something different. It is greed. Universities see the ridiculous amount of money college sports bring in and salivate. Give a kid a scholarship, lay a bunch of rules on him or her that are impossible to live with then sit back and rake in the money.

Good for the athletes. Their window of opportunity is pretty short. Injuries, eroding skills, lots of competition means they can only thrive on NIL for a short time. They must take advantage when they can. But the NCAA has taken a lot for granted. They have some illusion they are still in charge when the fact is they aren't. The athletes will continue to push the envelope taking away power from the NCAA. The previous post mentions consideration several times and that is one concept that seems to be missing. The athletes get all of the money but really do not have to do anything for it except show up. Their paycheck isn't tied to performance so consequently we have a literal free-for-all. They transfer and transfer with no goal other than to increase their street value. Scholarship money isn't insignificant and that goes to waste as they stay at an institution for a year or two then move on. It used to be that scholarship money had an actual purpose. An institution saw a student or athlete (or both hopefully) and awarded the scholarship with the idea that the student would go on to do great things in life using the education provided by the school. It is a marketing deal at its basic form. The public sees the alum doing great things and over their shoulder is a diploma with the schools logo on it. A simple concept but a worthy one.

Now we have created another level of professional sports with the one thing missing being actual performance. In order for this whole idea to survive we must start treating the athletes like professionals. The NFL pays handsomely but at least they bind a player to a team for a set period of years. Universities don't and that is the Achilles heel of the whole thing. The NCAA keeps making rules in hopes they can stay in charge but right now the athletes are and no NCAA executive will win going up against a collection of talented athletes. The only way to get it under control is to bind the athletes to teams legally and get the NCAA out of it.

And another thing...if you want star players to participate in bowl games, let them share in the profits the universities rake in.
I've moved into the camp of being pro-NIL, for the sake of the players. While NIL and transfer portal can hurt the product of college sports, there are also a lot of benefits it provide the athlete. To often we view these issues through the lens of our fandom and forget that these athletes aren't just people, but kids. Over the years, I've gotten a chance to coach kids who eventually played in college, and when you see them in school, it changes your perception of those athletes.

Like you said, NIL money offers these athletes an opportunity to profit off their abilities for the short time they are relevant. For most athletes, this isn't much money, but could be the difference between having some spending money in college and not. 99% of college athletes are making very little money on NIL. The ones that are actually pulling bigger figures are the athletes at top tier schools in sports that draw people's interest. There are over a half million college athletes in the NCAA and even more when you include NAIA, JUCO, etc. For most of those, a college scholarship is still their primary benefit.

My wife played college basketball. Without it, she probably wouldn't have been able to go to college financially. Instead, she graduated with a Masters, debt-free. Had she played in the NIL era, she probably could have gotten a little money here and there, but none of it would have held a candle to the financial benefit she got out of the free education. That scholarship still holds a lot of value for hundreds of thousands of kids. That said, let them earn some money, if that is the value they bring to the school or to a business.

Find ways to eliminate the loopholes.
 
I see this as your boss saying if you continue this production level you can earn x amount.
Until its done, it isn't done and business as usual.
There is always going to be value in performance. Players come out of nowhere and become stars, other highly touted recruits amount to nothing. In this format, people should be able to get their fair market value.

The incentive based payments (quid pro quo) is mainly what is outlawed. In reality, most professional contracts have these type of incentives, but more and more are just fully guaranteed salaries.

The part of it being contingent on being at a certain school probably has the biggest loophole. My guess is most of these NIL deals that aren't national brand deals are shorter term deals or one time payments. IE: You are a freshman linebacker at Nebraska, we'll give you a one year deal for a Runza sponsorship and we'll reevaluate our deal when the contract is up. Then if they leave as a sophomore, you just don't re-sign them.
 
There is always going to be value in performance. Players come out of nowhere and become stars, other highly touted recruits amount to nothing. In this format, people should be able to get their fair market value.

The incentive based payments (quid pro quo) is mainly what is outlawed. In reality, most professional contracts have these type of incentives, but more and more are just fully guaranteed salaries.

The part of it being contingent on being at a certain school probably has the biggest loophole. My guess is most of these NIL deals that aren't national brand deals are shorter term deals or one time payments. IE: You are a freshman linebacker at Nebraska, we'll give you a one year deal for a Runza sponsorship and we'll reevaluate our deal when the contract is up. Then if they leave as a sophomore, you just don't re-sign them.
Yep
One year deals. Even stars get injured, lose their careers etc.
The high school pre offers are a problem. There has to be some sort of real work done in reciprocation, even if its just junior HS kid in the background of some commercial. And that gets messy real quick.

Offering directly will clean up that end, but the other end, one entity tampering with another will undoubtedly increase and may be found harder to verify
 
It

Now we have created another level of professional sports with the one thing missing being actual performance. In order for this whole idea to survive we must start treating the athletes like professionals. The NFL pays handsomely but at least they bind a player to a team for a set period of years. Universities don't and that is the Achilles heel of the whole thing. The NCAA keeps making rules in hopes they can stay in charge but right now the athletes are and no NCAA executive will win going up against a collection of talented athletes. The only way to get it under control is to bind the athletes to teams legally and get the NCAA out of it.

And another thing...if you want star players to participate in bowl games, let them share in the profits the universities rake in.
 




I’m sorry but I pretty much disagree with all these responses that suggest the ncaa or the universities get into bed deeper with the NIL/player relationship. We do not need the NFL involved, we do not need to make them professionals, and we do not need to pay them. Just keep the status quo rules in place in regards to scholarship numbers and enforce the rules regarding the schools or coaches having any involvement in it. Is it perfect? No. But it seems like some of the knee jerk reactions to fix it are what’s going to ruin college football.

Someone remind me how NIL effected this years playoffs or final rankings?
 
I’m sorry but I pretty much disagree with all these responses that suggest the ncaa or the universities get into bed deeper with the NIL/player relationship. We do not need the NFL involved, we do not need to make them professionals, and we do not need to pay them. Just keep the status quo rules in place in regards to scholarship numbers and enforce the rules regarding the schools or coaches having any involvement in it. Is it perfect? No. But it seems like some of the knee jerk reactions to fix it are what’s going to ruin college football.

Someone remind me how NIL effected this years playoffs or final rankings?
Of course we don't want the NFL involved. But the players already are professionals. That is a fact. The bowl season is one casualty because players transfer after their regular season so they sever ties. Or players heading for the draft don't risk getting injured. There must be something that incentivizes players to finish a season and profit sharing bowl receipts would do it. And the final rankings question you asked? NIL absolutely affected it. Not so much for the top 2 or 3 teams but for the others it did. Playing a major bowl with your 3rd QB isn't going to win a lot of games. Get the players under contract that includes bowl games.
 
Of course we don't want the NFL involved. But the players already are professionals. That is a fact. The bowl season is one casualty because players transfer after their regular season so they sever ties. Or players heading for the draft don't risk getting injured. There must be something that incentivizes players to finish a season and profit sharing bowl receipts would do it. And the final rankings question you asked? NIL absolutely affected it. Not so much for the top 2 or 3 teams but for the others it did. Playing a major bowl with your 3rd QB isn't going to win a lot of games. Get the players under contract that includes bowl games.
Guys not playing bowl games started happening long before NIL came about. It’s just impossible to blame NIL on bowl game participation when the entire bowl interest has been going down ever since they started the playoffs. As for throwing the profits to the players? Most of the bowl games don’t make that much money.

No they are not professional players. They do not get paid for playing. They get paid for marketing their name. The very players bitching about NIL and how it’s changing college football are the same people trying to create a tidal wave to sink college football. Making this anything more like NFL or paying them for participation in bowl games is just begging to sink it.

Just let it play out as is and see where college football is in 5 years. The fixes I read from most fans are worse than the problem.
 



Of course we don't want the NFL involved. But the players already are professionals. That is a fact. The bowl season is one casualty because players transfer after their regular season so they sever ties. Or players heading for the draft don't risk getting injured. There must be something that incentivizes players to finish a season and profit sharing bowl receipts would do it. And the final rankings question you asked? NIL absolutely affected it. Not so much for the top 2 or 3 teams but for the others it did. Playing a major bowl with your 3rd QB isn't going to win a lot of games. Get the players under contract that includes bowl games.
Closing portal dates would help. As far as non NFL incentives, tough one there.
But keeping under classmen on a team, change portal season to protect the sport. It would fly in court.
 
Of course we don't want the NFL involved. But the players already are professionals. That is a fact. The bowl season is one casualty because players transfer after their regular season so they sever ties. Or players heading for the draft don't risk getting injured. There must be something that incentivizes players to finish a season and profit sharing bowl receipts would do it. And the final rankings question you asked? NIL absolutely affected it. Not so much for the top 2 or 3 teams but for the others it did. Playing a major bowl with your 3rd QB isn't going to win a lot of games. Get the players under contract that includes bowl games.

Disagree with the bolded. As they are not paid for the on-field performance, but rather their social media presence and marketing, they are NOT professional players.
 

I am ok with NIL but cannot see providing monies to high school athletes who have not played one down in college. I think it should be prohibited using as a recruiting inducement. Fine the collective for violations, make the athlete ineligible for looking for another school before entering the portal etc. The NCAA or legislation had better provide parameters as the abuse seems to be increasing.
 

GET TICKETS


Get 50% off on Omaha Steaks

Back
Top