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Nash Hutmacher: Will Make His Decision in July

Also what can you hunt. They might have whitetail but they do not have mule deer. Both have Elk and Ore has bear and sheep. As far as bird Ore is quail and a few species of duck.
Blacktail deer are the main deer in Oregon. I don't think that they have many whitetails. They have mule deer, too, but I think that those are mainly in the eastern part of the state. I think that they also have antelope in the eastern part of Oregon, which is a long ways from Eugene, but looks more like western Nebraska. Oregon folks, is this accurate? For blacktail deer, the style of hunting that is always emphasized in the outdoor magazines is silent, stealthy stalking, which would be fun, but it's not usually how things are done around here. I would assume that drawing bear, elk, sheep, or goat tags is not a sure thing, to put it mildly.
 

AzHusker

All Big 10
10 Year Member
Judging by the bass that Hutmacher was holding, and the numbers of fish that they caught, and the season of the year, I'm guessing that it was just some local bass pond that has a lot of bass. You don't need to stock a pond around Lincoln to have that sort of situation.

As for river smallmouth fishing,... that's my second favorite type of fishing, after trout. I grew up fishing the natural part of the Missouri River below Fort Randall dam, and my in-laws live in Virginia, so I now fish all of the smallmouth streams out there whenever possible. I generally do it with a fly rod, but I'm not a purist about it.
Fly rods are good, we’ve used them. On the river we fish here, we use ultra-light spinning gear, light, whippy 6 foot rod, and 4-6 pound test line. Spinners, small rapalas, artificial worms. The fish we catch are usually under 2 pounds, but a buddy caught a 6 pound spawner once...took him about 15 minutes to get her in with that light gear.
 
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Fly rods are good, we’ve used them. On the river we fish here, we use ultra-light spinning gear, light, whippy 6 foot rod, and 4-6 pound test line. Spinners, small rapalas, artificial worms. The fish we catch are usually under 2 pounds, but a buddy caught a 6 pound spawner once...took him about 15 minutes to get her in with that light gear.
In the wild part of the Missouri below Ft. Randall dam, 2-3 lb smallies were very common in the 80s and 90s, and they're still there, but at least I don't see them as often. In some of the rivers in Virginia, that's pretty much the norm. If you're a Civil War buff, you'll recognize the names: I fish the Rappahannock, Rapidan, and the Shenandoah. I haven't hit the James, Potomac, or New Rivers, but those will be on my list for the next visit.
 

Huskerthom

All Legend
5 Year Member
In the wild part of the Missouri below Ft. Randall dam, 2-3 lb smallies were very common in the 80s and 90s, and they're still there, but at least I don't see them as often. In some of the rivers in Virginia, that's pretty much the norm. If you're a Civil War buff, you'll recognize the names: I fish the Rappahannock, Rapidan, and the Shenandoah. I haven't hit the James, Potomac, or New Rivers, but those will be on my list for the next visit.
You do not want to fish the Potomac. Pretty polluted. If you do come out this way again though. Make sure you hit me up.
 
I want to join in on the fishing stories! I used to love fishing with my grandpa when I was growing up. First fish was a walleye I caught up in Canada (my grandpa and his fishing buddies owned a pretty small island up there and so we'd go every few years). I was 5 year old for my first trip and he set me up with my Charlie Tuna fishing rod and life vest to fish off the dock of the island. I started yelling I had a fish and grandpa sauntered down never believing I'd catch a fish with a Charlie Tuna rod, but alas I did and it made a delicious dinner. We shared lots of fun fishing trips to MN and Canada to fish over the years I was growing up.

A totally different type of fishing, but exhilarating all the same, I've been deep sea fishing 4 times (Caribbean twice and Hawaii twice). My last time in HI, I caught a Marlin that was bigger than I am. It was one of the coolest things I've ever done!

But back to our recruit. I had a feeling that Wan'Dale would come back to us and I have a feeling that Nash will be N. I'm pretty confident about it, actually. No doubt in my mind. He is meant to be a Husker.
 

CrabHusker

Alienating everyone, one post at a time.
5 Year Member
In the wild part of the Missouri below Ft. Randall dam, 2-3 lb smallies were very common in the 80s and 90s, and they're still there, but at least I don't see them as often. In some of the rivers in Virginia, that's pretty much the norm. If you're a Civil War buff, you'll recognize the names: I fish the Rappahannock, Rapidan, and the Shenandoah. I haven't hit the James, Potomac, or New Rivers, but those will be on my list for the next visit.
The New and James (as far away from Richmond as you can get) are both good smallmouth waters. The James in and around Richmond is a 'trophy' blue cat river, but smells like sewage.
 

Redfish

Red Shirt
5 Year Member
I'm from South Dakota, and I agree,... but even my own family thinks that I'm a bit odd because of it. You embrace what you know growing up. Guys who grow up noodling for catfish in Oklahoma don't dream about catching native cutthroats in the headwaters of the Rockies with a 4-weight fly rod. Again, I do, but trust me, I'm the weird one around here. The local fish are 1) walleye, 2) bass (largemouth, smallmouth, and white), 3) catfish, 4) northern pike, and 5) everyone grows up as a kid around here catching bluegills, crappie, and perch.

As for Frost and fly fishing, don't forget that Osborne was/is his hero and role model. Osborne had his own trout pond built with artificially aerated water to keep alive the trout that he loves to catch with a fly rod. Osborne also grew up hunting, and still hunts turkey (and pheasants, I think). In the same way that my students ask me about fly fishing and fly tying because it's unusual, cool, and I do it, I'm sure that Frost thought the same. Also, if you're not from the Sand Hills region, there are trout streams scattered across the northern parts of Nebraska as well as below and in Lake McConaughy, which would have been 3 hours west of Wood River, where he grew up. You can see guys fly fishing there. Personally, I buy a Nebraska annual fishing license so as to fish for trout near Royal, NE, and I regularly run into folks fishing there from all over Nebraska (and other states). Unless Hutmacher spent a lot of time in the Black Hills, it just isn't a common type of fishing around here, and most walleye fishermen who move to the Hills will drive back to the Missouri River big reservoirs to fish for walleye whenever possible. I'm the opposite--driving to the Hills to fly fish for trout--but, again, I'm the odd one around here.
Its funny, I have "noodled" catfish and carp and..... Native rainbows in Colorado too! Being able to adapt to your surroundings is very important. It will be much easier for him to do that in Lincoln over Eugene especially, but Madison is extremely liberal and he may struggle there with the outdoor culture. I was lucky enough to be able to have my guns in Lincoln when I went to school, I did a ton of hunting around the Lincoln area and it was awesome!
 
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