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My Hero, My Mentor, My Dad

cthusker

You talken to me?
5 Year Member
My sincere condolences but words can never convey what the loss of our dads means to all of us here. Lost my dad about 6 years ago another WW2 vet and member of the greatest generation. Funny story was when my brother and I were cleaning out my dads personal belongings we opened up a nice mahogany box buired deep in his bedroom dresser. When I opened it was stunned to see a silver star, bronze star, many battle citations and a purple hearts. I did know he landed D-day at Omaha Beach and was a 1st lieutenant (at the time) in the combat engineers. He fought from there all the way to Berlin. I still have many photo's he took on his combat journey in WW2.

I'm a gulf war vet yet dad NEVER talked to me (or anyone) about his combat service except for funny anadotes about his time overseas. My brother has never served and really didn't truly comprehend the significance of what we viewed in that little wooden box. These people returned to civilan life and asked for nothing but the opportunity to build their lives. Dad went on to a great business career and eventually became executive VP of a Fortune 500 company. I actually followed my grandfathers career in law enforcement who was COP in a mid sized city in NJ.

When the last of our WW2 vets are gone the nation will have lost a national treasure that can never be replaced. We all owe them a debt that can never repaid nor did they ask for either! I believe as I know you do too that their spirit, honor and valor will always be with us.

Again god speed to all our vets including those serving today...........

My dads the guy in the middle.......
dadww2.jpg
 

TnHusker87

Recruit
My sincere condolences but words can never convey what the loss of our dads means to all of us here. Lost my dad about 6 years ago another WW2 vet and member of the greatest generation. Funny story was when my brother and I were cleaning out my dads personal belongings we opened up a nice mahogany box buired deep in his bedroom dresser. When I opened it was stunned to see a silver star, bronze star, many battle citations and a purple hearts. I did know he landed D-day at Omaha Beach and was a 1st lieutenant (at the time) in the combat engineers. He fought from there all the way to Berlin. I still have many photo's he took on his combat journey in WW2.

I'm a gulf war vet yet dad NEVER talked to me (or anyone) about his combat service except for funny anadotes about his time overseas. My brother has never served and really didn't truly comprehend the significance of what we viewed in that little wooden box. These people returned to civilan life and asked for nothing but the opportunity to build their lives. Dad went on to a great business career and eventually became executive VP of a Fortune 500 company. I actually followed my grandfathers career in law enforcement who was COP in a mid sized city in NJ.

When the last of our WW2 vets are gone the nation will have lost a national treasure that can never be replaced. We all owe them a debt that can never repaid nor did they ask for either! I believe as I know you do too that their spirit, honor and valor will always be with us.

Again god speed to all our vets including those serving today...........

My dads the guy in the middle.......
View attachment 25071
Thanks for sharing CT! Do you know what battalion your father served with at Omaha Beach? My first active duty assignment was with the 20th Engineer Battalion that landed on Omaha Beach, and also deployed with them to Desert Storm.

Your story also reminds me of a bachelor uncle that passed away nearly two years ago at age 89. When my aunts and a cousin (a retired 1SG) moved him out of an apartment in Cheyenne, WY to a nursing home in Pierce, NE they found two bronze stars and a Combat Infantryman's Badge from his time in Korea ... and, neither of his sisters had a clue. They just didn't pass that stuff out as 'participation trophies' for that generation.
 

cthusker

You talken to me?
5 Year Member
Thanks for sharing CT! Do you know what battalion your father served with at Omaha Beach? My first active duty assignment was with the 20th Engineer Battalion that landed on Omaha Beach, and also deployed with them to Desert Storm.

Your story also reminds me of a bachelor uncle that passed away nearly two years ago at age 89. When my aunts and a cousin (a retired 1SG) moved him out of an apartment in Cheyenne, WY to a nursing home in Pierce, NE they found two bronze stars and a Combat Infantryman's Badge from his time in Korea ... and, neither of his sisters had a clue. They just didn't pass that stuff out as 'participation trophies' for that generation.
Belive it was the 299th Combat Engineer Battalion but he finished the war with the 284th Combat Engineers. He was with the 284th during the Battle of the Bulge and stayed with that unit until VE day. They were the unit that was at The Battle of Remagen and attached to Patton's Third Army. Dad did tell me a very amusing story about meeting Patton up close and personal! Said he got his AZZ chewed out by him for being out of uniform while tucked down in a fox hole... It was really funny the way he told the story! I sure miss him every single day..........

Those people were no BRAG.. all FACT!
 
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Hooked on Huskers

I'm old as a rock
5 Year Member
My sincere condolences but words can never convey what the loss of our dads means to all of us here. Lost my dad about 6 years ago another WW2 vet and member of the greatest generation. Funny story was when my brother and I were cleaning out my dads personal belongings we opened up a nice mahogany box buired deep in his bedroom dresser. When I opened it was stunned to see a silver star, bronze star, many battle citations and a purple hearts. I did know he landed D-day at Omaha Beach and was a 1st lieutenant (at the time) in the combat engineers. He fought from there all the way to Berlin. I still have many photo's he took on his combat journey in WW2.

I'm a gulf war vet yet dad NEVER talked to me (or anyone) about his combat service except for funny anadotes about his time overseas. My brother has never served and really didn't truly comprehend the significance of what we viewed in that little wooden box. These people returned to civilan life and asked for nothing but the opportunity to build their lives. Dad went on to a great business career and eventually became executive VP of a Fortune 500 company. I actually followed my grandfathers career in law enforcement who was COP in a mid sized city in NJ.

When the last of our WW2 vets are gone the nation will have lost a national treasure that can never be replaced. We all owe them a debt that can never repaid nor did they ask for either! I believe as I know you do too that their spirit, honor and valor will always be with us.

Again god speed to all our vets including those serving today...........

My dads the guy in the middle.......
View attachment 25071
Weird. See my post #30.

yet dad NEVER talked to me (or anyone) about his combat service
My dad never discussed his WW2 experience. Third party info ..... my mom.

I were cleaning out my dads personal belongings we opened up a nice mahogany box buired deep in his bedroom dresser. When I opened it was stunned to see a silver star, bronze star, many battle citations and a purple hearts.
Me too (actually my sister). Opened up my dad's metal box, 1 purple heart medal and Ruger german pistol (captured I think).

landed at Omaha Beach
He was not a 1st Normandy invasion (D-Day) but about 5 days later. Very few enemy troops .... retreat and/or ran out of ammo. Later on, he was involved Battle of Remagen bridge.

Purple Heart ..... according to my mom, somewhat minor injury. Hidden mine, a few stitches in his foot and lost his little toe. Who knows, Omaha beach or Remagen or whatever. Anyway, quickly recovered but awarded Purple Heart. My mom didn't say after Remagen battle story .... beats me from now on; mystery.
 
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TnHusker87

Recruit
Belive it was the 299th Combat Engineer Battalion but he finished the war with the 284th Combat Engineers. He was with the 284th during the Battle of the Bulge and stayed with that unit until VE day. They were the unit that was at The Battle of Remagen and attached to Patton's Third Army. Dad did tell me a very amusing story about meeting Patton up close and personal! Said he got his AZZ chewed out by him for being out of uniform while tucked down in a fox hole... It was really funny the way he told the story! I sure miss him every single day..........

Those people were no BRAG.. all FACT!
Thanks for sharing CT. I crossed paths with the 299th a few times ... first time during Operation Desert Storm and again when I was stationed at Ft Hood, TX and later at the National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA. Today, they are part of the 4th Infantry Division at Ft Carson, CO.

Less flattering recollection of the 299th from Desert Storm ... they had one Reserve component company out of Arkansas (D Co / 299th). That company got busted for 'contraband' trying to hide some captured weapons in some equipment 'cooling or oil reservoirs' for redeployment in April 1991 ... I think they spent an extra 30 days in the desert on some collective 'extra duty' after the rest of us re-deployed.
 

cthusker

You talken to me?
5 Year Member
Thanks for sharing CT. I crossed paths with the 299th a few times ... first time during Operation Desert Storm and again when I was stationed at Ft Hood, TX and later at the National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA. Today, they are part of the 4th Infantry Division at Ft Carson, CO.

Less flattering recollection of the 299th from Desert Storm ... they had one Reserve component company out of Arkansas (D Co / 299th). That company got busted for 'contraband' trying to hide some captured weapons in some equipment 'cooling or oil reservoirs' for redeployment in April 1991 ... I think they spent an extra 30 days in the desert on some collective 'extra duty' after the rest of us re-deployed.
Perhaps it was in that units DNA cause dad seemed to have a complete footlocker FULL of 45's and lugers upon his return stateside according to my grandpa.... :Lol:
 

DIHRDHskr

Red Shirt
5 Year Member
My sincere condolences but words can never convey what the loss of our dads means to all of us here. Lost my dad about 6 years ago another WW2 vet and member of the greatest generation. Funny story was when my brother and I were cleaning out my dads personal belongings we opened up a nice mahogany box buired deep in his bedroom dresser. When I opened it was stunned to see a silver star, bronze star, many battle citations and a purple hearts. I did know he landed D-day at Omaha Beach and was a 1st lieutenant (at the time) in the combat engineers. He fought from there all the way to Berlin. I still have many photo's he took on his combat journey in WW2.

I'm a gulf war vet yet dad NEVER talked to me (or anyone) about his combat service except for funny anadotes about his time overseas. My brother has never served and really didn't truly comprehend the significance of what we viewed in that little wooden box. These people returned to civilan life and asked for nothing but the opportunity to build their lives. Dad went on to a great business career and eventually became executive VP of a Fortune 500 company. I actually followed my grandfathers career in law enforcement who was COP in a mid sized city in NJ.

When the last of our WW2 vets are gone the nation will have lost a national treasure that can never be replaced. We all owe them a debt that can never repaid nor did they ask for either! I believe as I know you do too that their spirit, honor and valor will always be with us.

Again god speed to all our vets including those serving today...........

My dads the guy in the middle.......
Incredible generation, one that will probably never be duplicated. Thanks for that wonderful tribute to your Dad and your thoughts.
 

FullbackTrap

Red Shirt
5 Year Member
Thanks to all for your incredible words and yes, at 64, I am incredibly fortunate to have had him with me so many years. He lived with us in Virginia Beach his last 2 years and we were able to watch the Huskers, listen to Big Band music, and discuss life and both of our times in the Navy. I am blessed!
It helps in times like this to talk about some of the reasons why you admire a lost loved one so much ... grieving is only part of the process, a necessary one, but remembering and sharing are wholesome and rewarding parts of the process that we just should never hold back.

Thank you for sharing ... you've touched a lot of friends you didn't even know you had, and helped them remember (perhaps with a tear or two) something about a loved one they hold dear.
 

NUinID

Scout Team
2 Year Member
Sorry for your loss.

My dad died 9 years ago on July 31st. He had COPD, he was 83 at the time. He was considered a WW2 vet as he was in occupied Italy late 45-46. He was too young for combat.

I am watching the US Open right now thinking about sitting with my dad watching it in 2009. My mom needed a break and went out of town with my sister. So I took care of him over the weekend. We just sat and talked and watch golf. That was really all he could do on the oxygen.

The ironic thing is he wasn’t a smoker. He caught a bad bacterial infection 25 years before and it severely weakened nd his lungs.

He died the next summer. He was going into the local nursing home and had to have a physical to do that. He got back from the physical and my mom said they got him back in his chair. She came back a few minutes later and was dead. I guess he thought it was time.

The first Husker game I went to was 1977 vs TCU with my dad. I was 11. They won something like 63-7. We ate at Barry’s before the game. That was back when they still had a cafeteria style lunch line. I still remember it so vividly.
 
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Today I lost my Dad. 94 years old, WWII Veteran, 39 years as an instrumental music teacher, and reason for loving Nebraska Football. Went to my first game in 62' for Band Day as he took the Ogallala band to Lincoln. I was hooked. We listened to games on the radio together, watched them on TV and relished in the victories and sat in silence after losses. Moved to Lincoln in 68' and he and I went to many games over the years. Even after I joined the Navy in 74, everytime we talked, it was about Nebraska Football. Yesterday we were talking about Scott Frost and how optimistic we are for this coming season and looking forward to watching games together.

Dad was on a Jeep Carrier, USS Kalinin Bay in the battle of Leyte Gulf, the largest Naval battle ever in October, 1944. He loved his Naval Service and was a typical Greatest Generation patriot and never thought about how great they truly were. I will miss my Dad but know he is with Mom and in Husker Heaven. God Bless those men and women that gave us what we have today.
So sorry for your loss. With each member of that generation we lose, the world is a little less then it was before. What they endured as young people with the Depression and the WW2 and what they were able to accomplish after those events is plain amazing. Like your Dad my Grandpa served as a young man. He was a field medic, came into the Battle of the Bulge with Patton. Went into Germany and along with his unit found Buchenwald Concentration Camp. He remained there until early 1946 helping care for the camp survivors. He never had sons just girls. I was one of three grandsons he had. He told a very small part of what he saw during the war to each of us boys but never more then an anecdote. When he died 4 years ago at 94 the 3 of us boys were able to sit down all at the same time for the first time as adults and talk about what he told each of us and it wasn’t much. My Grandma is still with us and just turned 97. She knows a little as well but he never told her much either. The only thing I know for sure is he came home, raised a family, built a business, loved every damn one of us, introduced me to Husker Football when I was little and was haunted by what he saw the rest of his life. He had nightmares most nights for the rest of his life. It amazes me as tortured as he was nearly every night he went to sleep that he was still able to get up every morning and accomplish what he did day after day and year after year. My Grandpa’s story isn’t much different then most of the boys who went over there and came home men with a bunch of medals in their bag that didn’t mean a damn thing to them and every damn one of them are heroes for what they were able to do after. Again, I am so very sorry for the loss of your Father. Godspeed
 
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