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Making a case for Miami in the Big Ten?

DuckTownHusker

Blackshirt Sith Lord
10 Year Member
First things first, I really like the Big Ten adding USC and UCLA. They've created a true coast-to-coast conference. Yes, it was a bit reactionary in response to the SEC adding Oklahoma and Texas, but I think it's the better business move. Yes, OU+UT are the better teams, but the SEC already recruits Texas (and Oklahoma) heavily. Even before A&M joined, it's not like Texans or Oklahomans couldn't drive a hundred miles to watch their kid play at LSU or Arkansas.

The West Coast expansion of the Big Ten also served to hem in the SEC. Simply put, there just aren't that many great teams left outside of the existing SEC footprint. Sure, Notre Dame, Oregon, or Stanford could be good pickups, but it just doesn't really fit. If we're talking established, blue blood type programs, the three obvious targets are Miami, FSU, and Clemson.

So if I'm the Big Ten, I'd move hard on Miami, and either FSU or Clemson, whichever seems more willing to budge. First, it drops an anchor into the heart of Florida (and the south) for recruiting. Teams like Nebraska (and OSU, Michigan, etc) have always recruited nationally, but having conference exposure down south is good for the rest of the conference. Right now, the Top 100 blue chip kids all wind up on the rosters of Ohio State, Alabama, Notre Dame, and so forth, but we all know the deep south is much deeper than that. There are still a plethora of kids who aren't that elite top crust, but are still very respectable 4 star athletes. And it seems like they wind up playing for Kentucky, South Carolina, Georgia Tech, and so forth. Regional schools that are decent - but not elite. Why couldn't those same kids play for Iowa, Indiana, or Purdue? Having more exposure would help the entire conference.

Miami also has built-in rivalries with Nebraska and Penn State, plus established history with other B1G teams. They've played the Nittany Lions 13 times, the Huskers 12 times, and even Rutgers 11 times. Miami has only played Wake Forest 9 times.

I'll probably get grilled for saying this, but pound-for-pound I think Nebraska-Miami might be our best rivalry. Even over Oklahoma. Please note - emphasis on the "per capita" part of that equation. We've played Oklahoma a heck of a lot more, but I can't think of a college football rivalry that's been played just 12 times and has produced four national champions. Nearly every time the Cornhuskers and Hurricanes have taken the field, it's had massive, national implications, affecting the entire season. It's never a low-stakes game.

If the B1G expands further, I hope they consider The Sunshine State. And I'd love to get a regular Miami game on the schedule.


Some quick facts:

  • Nebraska's first bowl win was over Miami (1962)
  • 1983 Orange Bowl - Miami over Nebraska for a consensus National Title
  • 1991 Orange Bowl - Miami over Nebraska, Hurricanes clinch AP National Title
  • 1994 Orange Bowl - Nebraska over Miami for a consensus National Title
  • 2001 Rose Bowl - Miami over Nebraska for a BCS National Title
  • One of the teams has been the #1 ranked team in the nation four times.
  • Seven games have featured a Top Ten team
  • Both teams have been ranked five times.
 

BleedinHuskerRed

Scout Team
5 Year Member
First things first, I really like the Big Ten adding USC and UCLA. They've created a true coast-to-coast conference. Yes, it was a bit reactionary in response to the SEC adding Oklahoma and Texas, but I think it's the better business move. Yes, OU+UT are the better teams, but the SEC already recruits Texas (and Oklahoma) heavily. Even before A&M joined, it's not like Texans or Oklahomans couldn't drive a hundred miles to watch their kid play at LSU or Arkansas.

The West Coast expansion of the Big Ten also served to hem in the SEC. Simply put, there just aren't that many great teams left outside of the existing SEC footprint. Sure, Notre Dame, Oregon, or Stanford could be good pickups, but it just doesn't really fit. If we're talking established, blue blood type programs, the three obvious targets are Miami, FSU, and Clemson.

So if I'm the Big Ten, I'd move hard on Miami, and either FSU or Clemson, whichever seems more willing to budge. First, it drops an anchor into the heart of Florida (and the south) for recruiting. Teams like Nebraska (and OSU, Michigan, etc) have always recruited nationally, but having conference exposure down south is good for the rest of the conference. Right now, the Top 100 blue chip kids all wind up on the rosters of Ohio State, Alabama, Notre Dame, and so forth, but we all know the deep south is much deeper than that. There are still a plethora of kids who aren't that elite top crust, but are still very respectable 4 star athletes. And it seems like they wind up playing for Kentucky, South Carolina, Georgia Tech, and so forth. Regional schools that are decent - but not elite. Why couldn't those same kids play for Iowa, Indiana, or Purdue? Having more exposure would help the entire conference.

Miami also has built-in rivalries with Nebraska and Penn State, plus established history with other B1G teams. They've played the Nittany Lions 13 times, the Huskers 12 times, and even Rutgers 11 times. Miami has only played Wake Forest 9 times.

I'll probably get grilled for saying this, but pound-for-pound I think Nebraska-Miami might be our best rivalry. Even over Oklahoma. Please note - emphasis on the "per capita" part of that equation. We've played Oklahoma a heck of a lot more, but I can't think of a college football rivalry that's been played just 12 times and has produced four national champions. Nearly every time the Cornhuskers and Hurricanes have taken the field, it's had massive, national implications, affecting the entire season. It's never a low-stakes game.

If the B1G expands further, I hope they consider The Sunshine State. And I'd love to get a regular Miami game on the schedule.


Some quick facts:

  • Nebraska's first bowl win was over Miami (1962)
  • 1983 Orange Bowl - Miami over Nebraska for a consensus National Title
  • 1991 Orange Bowl - Miami over Nebraska, Hurricanes clinch AP National Title
  • 1994 Orange Bowl - Nebraska over Miami for a consensus National Title
  • 2001 Rose Bowl - Miami over Nebraska for a BCS National Title
  • One of the teams has been the #1 ranked team in the nation four times.
  • Seven games have featured a Top Ten team
  • Both teams have been ranked five times.

This is really well thought-out, Duck. And as much as I dislike Iowa, Wisconsin, etc., no one gets my absolute hate and disdain like Miami. Might be good to get them in the conference. Keeps things interesting. ;)
 

wcbsas

All Big 10
20 Year Member
This is really well thought-out, Duck. And as much as I dislike Iowa, Wisconsin, etc., no one gets my absolute hate and disdain like Miami. Might be good to get them in the conference. Keeps things interesting. ;)
Some of us hate Wisconsin ... but I guess you have to live in that state in order to hate its football program (and fans)! I suspect Iowa is high on many people's list!
 

wcbsas

All Big 10
20 Year Member
First things first, I really like the Big Ten adding USC and UCLA. They've created a true coast-to-coast conference. Yes, it was a bit reactionary in response to the SEC adding Oklahoma and Texas, but I think it's the better business move. Yes, OU+UT are the better teams, but the SEC already recruits Texas (and Oklahoma) heavily. Even before A&M joined, it's not like Texans or Oklahomans couldn't drive a hundred miles to watch their kid play at LSU or Arkansas.

The West Coast expansion of the Big Ten also served to hem in the SEC. Simply put, there just aren't that many great teams left outside of the existing SEC footprint. Sure, Notre Dame, Oregon, or Stanford could be good pickups, but it just doesn't really fit. If we're talking established, blue blood type programs, the three obvious targets are Miami, FSU, and Clemson.

So if I'm the Big Ten, I'd move hard on Miami, and either FSU or Clemson, whichever seems more willing to budge. First, it drops an anchor into the heart of Florida (and the south) for recruiting. Teams like Nebraska (and OSU, Michigan, etc) have always recruited nationally, but having conference exposure down south is good for the rest of the conference. Right now, the Top 100 blue chip kids all wind up on the rosters of Ohio State, Alabama, Notre Dame, and so forth, but we all know the deep south is much deeper than that. There are still a plethora of kids who aren't that elite top crust, but are still very respectable 4 star athletes. And it seems like they wind up playing for Kentucky, South Carolina, Georgia Tech, and so forth. Regional schools that are decent - but not elite. Why couldn't those same kids play for Iowa, Indiana, or Purdue? Having more exposure would help the entire conference.

Miami also has built-in rivalries with Nebraska and Penn State, plus established history with other B1G teams. They've played the Nittany Lions 13 times, the Huskers 12 times, and even Rutgers 11 times. Miami has only played Wake Forest 9 times.

I'll probably get grilled for saying this, but pound-for-pound I think Nebraska-Miami might be our best rivalry. Even over Oklahoma. Please note - emphasis on the "per capita" part of that equation. We've played Oklahoma a heck of a lot more, but I can't think of a college football rivalry that's been played just 12 times and has produced four national champions. Nearly every time the Cornhuskers and Hurricanes have taken the field, it's had massive, national implications, affecting the entire season. It's never a low-stakes game.

If the B1G expands further, I hope they consider The Sunshine State. And I'd love to get a regular Miami game on the schedule.


Some quick facts:

  • Nebraska's first bowl win was over Miami (1962)
  • 1983 Orange Bowl - Miami over Nebraska for a consensus National Title
  • 1991 Orange Bowl - Miami over Nebraska, Hurricanes clinch AP National Title
  • 1994 Orange Bowl - Nebraska over Miami for a consensus National Title
  • 2001 Rose Bowl - Miami over Nebraska for a BCS National Title
  • One of the teams has been the #1 ranked team in the nation four times.
  • Seven games have featured a Top Ten team
  • Both teams have been ranked five times.
I still wonder if it is about brand name versus TV markets ... does Miami's brand warrant enough to consider inclusion? Miami cannot sell out their own stadium? The City of Miami itself hasn't proven to be very supportive of programs/teams. The TV market is huge but will it want the B1G Network - for Miami athletics?

Miami is a private school and NW and now USC aside its not exactly the profile the B1G follows.
Miami is not an AAU member.
 

Quality Czech

Recruit
15 Year Member
First things first, I really like the Big Ten adding USC and UCLA. They've created a true coast-to-coast conference. Yes, it was a bit reactionary in response to the SEC adding Oklahoma and Texas, but I think it's the better business move. Yes, OU+UT are the better teams, but the SEC already recruits Texas (and Oklahoma) heavily. Even before A&M joined, it's not like Texans or Oklahomans couldn't drive a hundred miles to watch their kid play at LSU or Arkansas.

The West Coast expansion of the Big Ten also served to hem in the SEC. Simply put, there just aren't that many great teams left outside of the existing SEC footprint. Sure, Notre Dame, Oregon, or Stanford could be good pickups, but it just doesn't really fit. If we're talking established, blue blood type programs, the three obvious targets are Miami, FSU, and Clemson.

So if I'm the Big Ten, I'd move hard on Miami, and either FSU or Clemson, whichever seems more willing to budge. First, it drops an anchor into the heart of Florida (and the south) for recruiting. Teams like Nebraska (and OSU, Michigan, etc) have always recruited nationally, but having conference exposure down south is good for the rest of the conference. Right now, the Top 100 blue chip kids all wind up on the rosters of Ohio State, Alabama, Notre Dame, and so forth, but we all know the deep south is much deeper than that. There are still a plethora of kids who aren't that elite top crust, but are still very respectable 4 star athletes. And it seems like they wind up playing for Kentucky, South Carolina, Georgia Tech, and so forth. Regional schools that are decent - but not elite. Why couldn't those same kids play for Iowa, Indiana, or Purdue? Having more exposure would help the entire conference.

Miami also has built-in rivalries with Nebraska and Penn State, plus established history with other B1G teams. They've played the Nittany Lions 13 times, the Huskers 12 times, and even Rutgers 11 times. Miami has only played Wake Forest 9 times.

I'll probably get grilled for saying this, but pound-for-pound I think Nebraska-Miami might be our best rivalry. Even over Oklahoma. Please note - emphasis on the "per capita" part of that equation. We've played Oklahoma a heck of a lot more, but I can't think of a college football rivalry that's been played just 12 times and has produced four national champions. Nearly every time the Cornhuskers and Hurricanes have taken the field, it's had massive, national implications, affecting the entire season. It's never a low-stakes game.

If the B1G expands further, I hope they consider The Sunshine State. And I'd love to get a regular Miami game on the schedule.


Some quick facts:

  • Nebraska's first bowl win was over Miami (1962)
  • 1983 Orange Bowl - Miami over Nebraska for a consensus National Title
  • 1991 Orange Bowl - Miami over Nebraska, Hurricanes clinch AP National Title
  • 1994 Orange Bowl - Nebraska over Miami for a consensus National Title
  • 2001 Rose Bowl - Miami over Nebraska for a BCS National Title
  • One of the teams has been the #1 ranked team in the nation four times.
  • Seven games have featured a Top Ten team
  • Both teams have been ranked five times.
I could live with this - but it would have to be done as a package deal with Notre Dame to make the $ worth the bite. Miami and ND have some history as well. I wonder if South Florida has a large Big Ten alumni base (like LA)? The native Floridians might not get as excited, but the alums will love it and definitely support the games. Plus, a regular season game in Miami would be like a bowl game, and getting Miami in Lincoln in November could be interesting…
 

DuckTownHusker

Blackshirt Sith Lord
10 Year Member
I could live with this - but it would have to be done as a package deal with Notre Dame to make the $ worth the bite. Miami and ND have some history as well. I wonder if South Florida has a large Big Ten alumni base (like LA)? The native Floridians might not get as excited, but the alums will love it and definitely support the games. Plus, a regular season game in Miami would be like a bowl game, and getting Miami in Lincoln in November could be interesting…

Florida has been the #1 retirement destination in the country for decades. I guarantee you there are tons of retirees who are also alums of Ohio State, Iowa, etc. down there.

Plus if anyone is disputing the AAU thing - Miami is consistently a top-ranked academic institution. Yes, they are not an AAU member. Neither are we. Iowa State and Syracuse have voluntarily left the AAU. Notre Dame isn't AAU. They're not FBS (or even football) but Georgetown, William and Mary, and Pepperdine aren't AAU members, either. Point is, academic prestige is not 100% synonymous with AAU.

I don't think AAU status is this insurmountable, unbreakable rule for Big Ten admission anymore. I do think the conference values academics, though, so we're not going to allow some DeVry strip-mall college into the conference. But major institutions like Miami, FSU or Clemson absolutely have a chance.
 

dwc13

Recruit
2 Year Member
Before USC and UCLA were approved to join the B1G Ten, I would have said NFW to the possibility of adding Miami (FL).
That being said, if Miami (FL) is legitimately in play, then that probably means UNC and other ACC programs are also available. I'd love to see UNC, Virginia, Miami (FL) and Georgia Tech added to the conference. As a bonus, getting 2 teams in the heart of SEC country would probably give Sankey indigestion and help B1G programs recruit talent rich Florida and Georgia.
 

BigRedAvenger

Poster of Substance
5 Year Member
No matter how unlikely, I'd be happy with any combination of Miami, FSU, Stanford, Notre Dame, Oregon, Washington, Texas, Oklahoma.

I keep reading how the ACC is likely off limits for anyone though, without a complete destruction of the league by a Big Ten SEC combined raid. It would seem incredibly unlikely that the Big Ten would get any of the aforementioned schools in this scenario though.
 

TnHusker87

Mayor of Shinola
2 Year Member
Florida has been the #1 retirement destination in the country for decades. I guarantee you there are tons of retirees who are also alums of Ohio State, Iowa, etc. down there.

Plus if anyone is disputing the AAU thing - Miami is consistently a top-ranked academic institution. Yes, they are not an AAU member. Neither are we. Iowa State and Syracuse have voluntarily left the AAU. Notre Dame isn't AAU. They're not FBS (or even football) but Georgetown, William and Mary, and Pepperdine aren't AAU members, either. Point is, academic prestige is not 100% synonymous with AAU.

I don't think AAU status is this insurmountable, unbreakable rule for Big Ten admission anymore. I do think the conference values academics, though, so we're not going to allow some DeVry strip-mall college into the conference. But major institutions like Miami, FSU or Clemson absolutely have a chance.
I think you did a nice job on your opening post hi-liting the football aspect of expansion. But much as it pains me to say this about 'Thug-U,' Miami has a very fine academic pedigree and I believe that is an important attribute and consideration for the B1G presidents.

I don't know if Clemson or FSU are in play. I tend to believe they are more likely to lean to the SEC.
 

DuckTownHusker

Blackshirt Sith Lord
10 Year Member
I think you did a nice job on your opening post hi-liting the football aspect of expansion. But much as it pains me to say this about 'Thug-U,' Miami has a very fine academic pedigree and I believe that is an important attribute and consideration for the B1G presidents.

I don't know if Clemson or FSU are in play. I tend to believe they are more likely to lean to the SEC.

I like Miami + FSU.

I think the Gators would strongly fight another Florida team in the SEC.

South Carolina doesn't have the clout to stop Clemson if they want in, IMO.

I also want to see a model where Mizzou, LSU, Auburn and Clemson all play in the Tiger Division.
 

George B. A. Husker

Recruit
2 Year Member
First things first, I really like the Big Ten adding USC and UCLA. They've created a true coast-to-coast conference. Yes, it was a bit reactionary in response to the SEC adding Oklahoma and Texas, but I think it's the better business move. Yes, OU+UT are the better teams, but the SEC already recruits Texas (and Oklahoma) heavily. Even before A&M joined, it's not like Texans or Oklahomans couldn't drive a hundred miles to watch their kid play at LSU or Arkansas.

The West Coast expansion of the Big Ten also served to hem in the SEC. Simply put, there just aren't that many great teams left outside of the existing SEC footprint. Sure, Notre Dame, Oregon, or Stanford could be good pickups, but it just doesn't really fit. If we're talking established, blue blood type programs, the three obvious targets are Miami, FSU, and Clemson.

So if I'm the Big Ten, I'd move hard on Miami, and either FSU or Clemson, whichever seems more willing to budge. First, it drops an anchor into the heart of Florida (and the south) for recruiting. Teams like Nebraska (and OSU, Michigan, etc) have always recruited nationally, but having conference exposure down south is good for the rest of the conference. Right now, the Top 100 blue chip kids all wind up on the rosters of Ohio State, Alabama, Notre Dame, and so forth, but we all know the deep south is much deeper than that. There are still a plethora of kids who aren't that elite top crust, but are still very respectable 4 star athletes. And it seems like they wind up playing for Kentucky, South Carolina, Georgia Tech, and so forth. Regional schools that are decent - but not elite. Why couldn't those same kids play for Iowa, Indiana, or Purdue? Having more exposure would help the entire conference.

Miami also has built-in rivalries with Nebraska and Penn State, plus established history with other B1G teams. They've played the Nittany Lions 13 times, the Huskers 12 times, and even Rutgers 11 times. Miami has only played Wake Forest 9 times.

I'll probably get grilled for saying this, but pound-for-pound I think Nebraska-Miami might be our best rivalry. Even over Oklahoma. Please note - emphasis on the "per capita" part of that equation. We've played Oklahoma a heck of a lot more, but I can't think of a college football rivalry that's been played just 12 times and has produced four national champions. Nearly every time the Cornhuskers and Hurricanes have taken the field, it's had massive, national implications, affecting the entire season. It's never a low-stakes game.

If the B1G expands further, I hope they consider The Sunshine State. And I'd love to get a regular Miami game on the schedule.


Some quick facts:

  • Nebraska's first bowl win was over Miami (1962)
  • 1983 Orange Bowl - Miami over Nebraska for a consensus National Title
  • 1991 Orange Bowl - Miami over Nebraska, Hurricanes clinch AP National Title
  • 1994 Orange Bowl - Nebraska over Miami for a consensus National Title
  • 2001 Rose Bowl - Miami over Nebraska for a BCS National Title
  • One of the teams has been the #1 ranked team in the nation four times.
  • Seven games have featured a Top Ten team
  • Both teams have been ranked five times.

IMO, the Big10 will continue to focus on TV market-share, strengthening their member programs with larger media contracts compared to the SEC. Here's a breakdown of the largest Designated Market Areas based on Nielsen rankings for 2021-2022. Bold blue are Big10 markets. Bold red are key targets (per media reports). Bold orange are SEC markets. Add Atlanta to the SEC count, even though it might make sense for the Big10 to offer them. Same could probably be said for Miami. If so, that gives the SEC seven of the Top 30 markets.

1. NYC
2. LA
3. Chicago
4. Philadelphia

5. Dallas/Fort Worth
6. San Fran/Oakland/San Jose (Add Stanford, Cal to USC, UCLA)

7. Atlanta (Add GA Tech)
8. Houston
9. Washington DS (Add UVA to Maryland)
10. Boston
11. Phoenix
12. Seattle/Tacoma (Add UW)
13. Tampa/St. Pete
14. Minneapolis/St. Paul
15. Detroit
16. Denver
17. Orlando/Daytona/Melbourne
18. Miami/Ft. Lauderdale (Add Miami)
19. Cleveland/Canton/Akron
20. Sacramento (Add Stanford, Cal to USC, UCLA)
21.
Portland (Add Oregon)
22.
Charlotte (Add UNC)
23. St. Louis (half Illinois/half Mizzou?)
24. Raleigh/Durham/Fayetteville (Add UNC)
25. Indianapolis
26. Pittsburgh
27
. San Diego
28. Baltimore
29.
Nashville
30. Salt Lake City

If my designations are accurate, the Big10 has the top four markets in the country, and has 12 of the top 30 -- locked up. There are at least eight more markets that might make sense for the Big10 to grab (based on market size, geography, and academics).

So the obvious top target is Notre Dame. Based on market area, it also makes sense for the Big10 to add Cal and Stanford, Washington, and Oregon. Doing so adds the #6, #12, #20 and #21 markets in the country to the Big10 - - giving them 16 of the Top 30. [Can't believe USC and UCLA will play a schedule (long-term) where NU is their second-closest geographical opponent...]. It also makes sense to target UNC - - adding the #22 and #24 markets. Miami??? Maybe. GA Tech??? Maybe/probably - - though adding either wouldn't make them "Big10 markets. Have heard that GA Tech was told years ago that the SEC will NEVER let them in as they were once a member and left the conference. Virginia... maybe.

Regarding FSU, my son closely follows, and talk amongst their fan boards seems to be that FSU badly wants in the Big10 over the SEC. (US News now ranks FSU as a Top 20-ish public university). They don't show up on the top market area list until #108 (behind #105 Lincoln/Hastings/Kearney), but obviously are a major draw.
 

DuckTownHusker

Blackshirt Sith Lord
10 Year Member
Picking up Miami and FSU would be a major coup for the Big Ten. It means the conference all but owns recruiting in the Rust Belt, California, and Florida.

That's not to say that Florida kids wouldn't still play for UF (or UGA, BAMA, etc), but it sends a pretty large message that the Big Ten is a national conference while the SEC is regional.

The only recruiting hotbed the B1G wouldn't be in is Texas, which is unfortunate. But commanding such a huge presence across multiple recruiting grounds and TV markets is hard to beat.

Put it this way - who's the SEC going to retaliate with? Clemson, sure, but who else? UNC? VT? Kansas State? There's not that many good teams left on the table.
 

Cisco

Recruit
5 Year Member
Movement amongst the Big 12 and Pac 10 are more likely than anything with the Big Ten, SEC, or ACC right now, imo.

I think ND will remain status quo until the ACC GOR expires.

I also don't think anyone is getting out of the GOR in the ACC anytime soon. As much as people talk about it and speculate, there just doesn't seem to be any indication that it's feasible to challenge it.

So my expectation is that the SEC, Big Ten, and ACC remain pretty much the same until sometime around 2036.
 
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