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Jumbo shrimp on the Barbie

Bean

Grey Shirt
5 Year Member
My recipe said to half fry the bacon first because the shrimp cooks pretty fast and the bacon takes longer. So, IOT not have tough shrimp it said to half fry the bacon to the point it is still able to be wrapped around the shrimp. It worked well.
 
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NU_Alum

All American
5 Year Member
My recipe said to half fry the bacon first because the shrimp cooks pretty fast and the bacon takes longer. So, IOT not have tough shrimp it said to half fry the bacon to the point it is still able to be wrapped around the shrimp. It worked well.
That's the real trick unless you like undercooked bacon.

Good shrimp is amazing.
 

Show Me State Red

Red Shirt
2 Year Member
My recipe said to half fry the bacon first because the shrimp cooks pretty fast and the bacon takes longer. So, IOT not have tough shrimp it said to half fry the bacon to the point it is still able to be wrapped around the shrimp. It worked well.
That is a good point. We have never grilled shrimp wrapped in bacon for that reason. Our current bacon consumption is focused on asparagus. Bacon wrapped asparagus has the same hypnotic affect on me as corn on the cob slathered in butter.
 

chicago husker

Junior Varsity
5 Year Member
From Serious Eats website.

Solution #5: Get Dry to Stay Moist
We like moist food. We want our shrimp to be juicy. But there's a difference between surface moisture and internal moisture. Internal moisture is what we're really after. For the exterior, we actually want the exact opposite. Browning reactions can't take place until surface moisture has evaporated, and it takes an awful lot of energy to evaporate that moisture. When you place a damp skewer full of shrimp on the grill, for at least the first several minutes, you're waiting for surface moisture to evaporate. All the while, the interiors of those shrimp are getting hotter and hotter, thus expelling more moisture, which then has to be evaporated again, thus exacerbating the problem.

Fact is, if you want shrimp that stay moist inside, they have to start dry outside. Carefully blotting them with paper towels helps, but there's an even better solution. After skewering my shrimp, I lay the skewers over the edges of a baking dish so that the shrimp are completely elevated. I then place the whole thing, uncovered, in the refrigerator for an hour. Good air circulation means the shrimp dry out rapidly.

20150625-food-lab-grilled-shrimp-09.jpg

When I'm ready to grill, I brush the shrimp with some olive oil (unlike water-based liquids, oils and other fats can improve browning) and place them over the highest possible heat, pressing down on them slightly to ensure good contact with the grill grates.

20150625-food-lab-grilled-shrimp-10.jpg


Bingo.

20150625-food-lab-grilled-shrimp-12.jpg

The result is juicy shrimp with a texture that practically pops in your mouth as you bite into them, all with a sweet, richly browned crust that packs plenty of flavor. In all honesty, you don't really need much more than salt and pepper and perhaps a squeeze of lemon with shrimp this tasty...

20150625-food-lab-grilled-shrimp-14.jpg

...but who am I kidding? Garlic, parsley, and olive oil are always welcome at shrimp parties. I brushed this batch of shrimp with garlic and olive oil before grilling them, then tossed them with a bit of chopped parsley, more garlic, olive oil, and lemon after they came off the grill.

20150625-food-lab-grilled-shrimp-15.jpg

They may be shrimps, but as far as flavor is concerned, they're giants.
 

NU_Alum

All American
5 Year Member
From Serious Eats website.

Solution #5: Get Dry to Stay Moist
We like moist food. We want our shrimp to be juicy. But there's a difference between surface moisture and internal moisture. Internal moisture is what we're really after. For the exterior, we actually want the exact opposite. Browning reactions can't take place until surface moisture has evaporated, and it takes an awful lot of energy to evaporate that moisture. When you place a damp skewer full of shrimp on the grill, for at least the first several minutes, you're waiting for surface moisture to evaporate. All the while, the interiors of those shrimp are getting hotter and hotter, thus expelling more moisture, which then has to be evaporated again, thus exacerbating the problem.

Fact is, if you want shrimp that stay moist inside, they have to start dry outside. Carefully blotting them with paper towels helps, but there's an even better solution. After skewering my shrimp, I lay the skewers over the edges of a baking dish so that the shrimp are completely elevated. I then place the whole thing, uncovered, in the refrigerator for an hour. Good air circulation means the shrimp dry out rapidly.

20150625-food-lab-grilled-shrimp-09.jpg

When I'm ready to grill, I brush the shrimp with some olive oil (unlike water-based liquids, oils and other fats can improve browning) and place them over the highest possible heat, pressing down on them slightly to ensure good contact with the grill grates.

20150625-food-lab-grilled-shrimp-10.jpg


Bingo.

20150625-food-lab-grilled-shrimp-12.jpg

The result is juicy shrimp with a texture that practically pops in your mouth as you bite into them, all with a sweet, richly browned crust that packs plenty of flavor. In all honesty, you don't really need much more than salt and pepper and perhaps a squeeze of lemon with shrimp this tasty...

20150625-food-lab-grilled-shrimp-14.jpg

...but who am I kidding? Garlic, parsley, and olive oil are always welcome at shrimp parties. I brushed this batch of shrimp with garlic and olive oil before grilling them, then tossed them with a bit of chopped parsley, more garlic, olive oil, and lemon after they came off the grill.

20150625-food-lab-grilled-shrimp-15.jpg

They may be shrimps, but as far as flavor is concerned, they're giants.
That's how I do my steak. S&P the day before and let it sit in the fridge at least overnight, up to two days. It becomes day af on the outside which makes for easy cooking to med rare on the inside with a nice charred outside.

Most meats/fish can benefit from this and it's easy to do.
 

RedStones

Self Quarantined b4 it was Cool
5 Year Member
That looks great, thanks for sharing. I'm definitely going to try that.
Just keep an eye on them because the cook pretty fast. Mine cooked in about 20 minutes on my Traeger instead of the 30 specified in the video.
 
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