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Interesting Tweet

Boji Husker

Scout Team
I would think the 25 plays in the 3rd quarter probably got the wheels on motion. That combined with the altitude was probably the death knell. Just a guess.

But I think Scott is full of it regarding the altitude. I really do. It is always a factor unless you dont run a bunch of plays or that you are in that much better shape than the team that is used to playing in that environment.

But I guess as the head coach, he doesnt want to use that as an excuse....despite admitting his team was gassed. He really is speaking out both sides of his mouth. Kind of like the no fear of failure mantra but being afraid to throw a pick in OT.

Lets face it, I think he is going through growing pains just like his kids. But I still have faith that he is the man for the job. GBR!
Flat out altitude is a factor. Best strategy would have been to fly out that morning. Guys are used to getting up and moving in the morning.
 

Cardinal

Blackshirt
10 Year Member
Flat out altitude is a factor. Best strategy would have been to fly out that morning. Guys are used to getting up and moving in the morning.
Actually, coming to Boulder 2-3 days before the game would be the best strategy. Altitude sickness often begins within an hour or two of arrival at altitude. Most slight cases (like what a mere 5400 feet in Boulder is most likely to cause) last only a day or two at the very most. Come in Wednesday and play on Saturday. Plus, they would have legal pot for the nausea. The trainers could (happily) pre-test it for the players.
 
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Boji Husker

Scout Team
Actually, coming to Boulder 2-3 days before the game would be the best strategy. Altitude sickness often begins within an hour or two of arrival at altitude. Most slight cases (like what a mere 5400 feet in Boulder is most likely to cause) last only a day or two at the very most. Come in Wednesday and play on Saturday. Plus, they would have legal pot for the nausea. The trainers could (happily) pre-test it for the players.
Agree that would be ideal, but dont know how practical. From what I've read getting there the day of is the next best alternative, and the day before the worst. I remember talk about this during the TO years as well.
 

LarstheRed

Junior Varsity
5 Year Member
CO ran 42 plays in 2nd half compared to NU 38. Longest poss for CO was 3:07. 2 of the 2nd half touchdowns by CO happened in 2: 05. I think it's fair to say both defenses had their hands full. I believe Frost said they were gassed, question would be what is the cause that needs to be addresses because before the game Frost said altitude should not be a factor.
Do you always ignore the explanations you are given, or are you not understanding? You can’t magically prepare for altitude, unless you have a facility specifically designed to emulate the oxygen levels. Can you run more, try to up the cardio? Sure, to a limited extent, but it’s still not the same creature.
 

joncarl

Nobody important
10 Year Member
Honestly I thought both games we had a lot of tacklers either running by or just plain whiffing on tackles. Tired or not, it just appear that no one 'broke' down to tackle, its like they wanted to make a big hit and instead did neither. I guess it is easier to teach them to slow down than to ramp it up. But I have been wrong before.
 

WestTexasHusker

Travel Squad
5 Year Member
Do you always ignore the explanations you are given, or are you not understanding? You can’t magically prepare for altitude, unless you have a facility specifically designed to emulate the oxygen levels. Can you run more, try to up the cardio? Sure, to a limited extent, but it’s still not the same creature.
Altitude was discussed ad nauseam before the game and was poo poo'd off. The coaches poo poo'd it off too, saying it wasn't a factor and we were in great shape. Or something like that.

Now suddenly it's a big deal. If it's not a big deal, then why do NFL teams spend such time researching and managing it when going to Denver?
 
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LarstheRed

Junior Varsity
5 Year Member
Altitude was discussed ad nauseam before the game and was poo poo'd off. The coaches poo poo'd it off too, saying it wasn't a factor and we were in great shape. Or something like that.

Now suddenly it's a big deal. If it's not a big deal, then why do NFL teams spend such time researching and managing it when going to Denver?
It was poo poo’d by the coaches because you don’t create doubt when you don’t need to. Are they supposed to say, ‘heck yes it’s a concern’ to a team that hasn’t displayed a great deal of mental toughness the last few years? And again, what would you have them do to manage this?

I’ve been to the facilities for the Suns and Cards, and they have actually rooms with cardio equipment in them that they can seal and simulate the oxygen levels at particular altitudes. We don’t have that, so what do we do differently?

The best remedy is execute, score points, don’t let them score points, and try to be in a position to substitute. We did that pretty well in the first half, but when that changed, the thin air became much more of a factor.

As others pointed out, in TO’s final season, with all those years of experience traveling to CU, his last NC team got gassed late. It happens. It’s why you never want to let teams hang around. I think back on some of the games played in Florida or Louisiana in years past, and that hot, humid home field worked against as well. You can’t flip a switch and adapt.
 

CrabHusker

Alienating everyone, one post at a time.
5 Year Member
Actually, coming to Boulder 2-3 days before the game would be the best strategy. Altitude sickness often begins within an hour or two of arrival at altitude. Most slight cases (like what a mere 5400 feet in Boulder is most likely to cause) last only a day or two at the very most. Come in Wednesday and play on Saturday. Plus, they would have legal pot for the nausea. The trainers could (happily) pre-test it for the players.
There is a downside to this. Multiple nights in enemy territory can lead to other, less desirable happenings.
 

Pops

I have squandered my resistance
10 Year Member
Do you always ignore the explanations you are given, or are you not understanding? You can’t magically prepare for altitude, unless you have a facility specifically designed to emulate the oxygen levels. Can you run more, try to up the cardio? Sure, to a limited extent, but it’s still not the same creature.
you always have to be a complete dick. Works well for you
 

Pops

I have squandered my resistance
10 Year Member
It was poo poo’d by the coaches because you don’t create doubt when you don’t need to. Are they supposed to say, ‘heck yes it’s a concern’ to a team that hasn’t displayed a great deal of mental toughness the last few years? And again, what would you have them do to manage this?

I’ve been to the facilities for the Suns and Cards, and they have actually rooms with cardio equipment in them that they can seal and simulate the oxygen levels at particular altitudes. We don’t have that, so what do we do differently?

The best remedy is execute, score points, don’t let them score points, and try to be in a position to substitute. We did that pretty well in the first half, but when that changed, the thin air became much more of a factor.

As others pointed out, in TO’s final season, with all those years of experience traveling to CU, his last NC team got gassed late. It happens. It’s why you never want to let teams hang around. I think back on some of the games played in Florida or Louisiana in years past, and that hot, humid home field worked against as well. You can’t flip a switch and adapt.
you don’t create doubt before the game when it should be a concern Yet now use it as an excuse after the game. As Blast said. Talking out both sides.
 

PlanoHusker

Recruit
5 Year Member
We have seen season after season of guys being in position, but not making the tackles, or bringing only minor impact when trying to get guys to the ground. I'd prefer we continue playing aggressive, and learning how to incorporate some better technique with that speed and aggression. That's not as easy to replicate in practice, because I'm sure we are not telling our guys to go full speed and run through receivers so we reduce injuries. They need to continue and get comfortable doing that at game speed. When you look at some old film, you see some DBs that were very aggressive tacklers, so we know it can be done.
During our first game against Southern AL, my son and I both noticed that their runners were able to spin out of our tackles a lot. We didn't wrap them up and take them to the ground. I assume it is because this is the way they play in practice so players don't get hurt, but it doesn't work for us in a game. There needs to be more emphasis placed on tackling.
 
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djlhuskerfan

Junior Varsity
10 Year Member
I can see the guys point a little. Possible they are trying to hard. They don't want to let coach Frost down. I think back to the Pelini era where the players seemed nervous and feared failure. It will get turned around I believe.
 
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