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Hamburgers

Middle-aged_Ball_Coach

Scout Team
2 Year Member
Not that I can really recall, but I don't think I've ever made a hamburger with Worcestershire. Perhaps I will try it later this summer.
It adds smoke flavors and salt along with that something or other flavor that I associate with steakhouse cooking. If you added absolutely nothing to a burger except Worcestershire sauce and either minced onions or onion powder, it would still make a great burger. I have tried all sorts of other seasonings over the years, but my go-to seasoning for everyday grilled burgers are garlic powder, minced onions, and Worcestershire sauce, and I mix them all into the beef before making patties. If I'm using lean beef (=>90& lean), I also an egg per pound to hold it together. If I want to add any more salt I'll dust the outsides of the patties with Lawry's seasoning salt. If I'm out of Worcestershire sauce I'll add a dash of liquid smoke and seasoning salt to the bowl before making patties. To me that's a foundation for pretty much anything else that I'd ever want to make that has a burger in it. That's why I used the same for the hot sausage + hamburger mix. I can add mushrooms and Swiss cheese to that, or cheddar cheese and bacon, or Muenster and horseradish, or jalapenos and nacho cheese. BBQ sauces work, too.

Man, now I'm hungry.
 
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Middle-aged_Ball_Coach

Scout Team
2 Year Member
Not that I can really recall, but I don't think I've ever made a hamburger with Worcestershire. Perhaps I will try it later this summer.
If you like the smell and taste of Worcestershire sauce, add an ounce per pound of meat before making patties. If you're not sure, make it a 1/2 oz, and you can drizzle it on the patties and/or buns later if you don't taste it. I'll add more than that if it's just for me, and I don't want to use any ketchup or similar condiments.

I personally can't taste the difference between the high-end stuff and the little bottles that you can get at the $1 store, so guess which ones I use. On a related note I also pick up garlic powder, minced onions, and onion powder either at the $1 store or at the dump bins at Walmart at the start of the summer. I don't cut corners with the Lawry's though.
 
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HUSKER HOT SAUCE

Be Yourself - Everyone Else Is Already Taken
5 Year Member
If you like the smell and taste of Worcestershire sauce, add an ounce per pound of meat before making patties. If you're not sure, make it a 1/2 oz, and you can drizzle it on the patties and/or buns later if you don't taste it. I'll add more than that if it's just for me, and I don't want to use any ketchup or similar condiments.

I personally can't taste the difference between the high-end stuff and the little bottles that you can get at the $1 store, so guess which ones I use. On a related note I also pick up garlic powder, minced onions, and onion powder either at the $1 store or at the dump bins at Walmart at the start of the summer. I don't cut corners with the Lawry's though.
I also use garlic powder on just about every meat I cook, including chicken and pork. I do like white pepper for steaks and burgers as the white pepper really mixes well with the garlic powder. The last couple of years, I've found the Weber N'Orleans Cajun seasoning that I really like, and a little goes a long way, but it is really good. I'll have to try the Worcestershire sauce when it warms up outside and I can slap a few burgers down on the grill.
 

Middle-aged_Ball_Coach

Scout Team
2 Year Member
I'll have to try the Worcestershire sauce when it warms up outside and I can slap a few burgers down on the grill.
It works best to use relatively lean hamburger (=>85% lean) so that the juices don't take out the Worcestershire flavor as the fat heats up and comes out as it's cooking. I like to mix the hamburger up first, then heat up the grill or pan or whatever because the meat holds the sauce and flavor better than if it's added later and doesn't have time to be absorbed.

If you like the smell of Worcestershire sauce, you're almost guaranteed to like the flavor, and if you like the flavor, it takes A LOT to use too much. I grew up eating a lot of wild game, and a great recipe for a roast from an old deer or antelope buck that tastes too strong is to cook it in a crock pot (which softens the meat) with just minimal spices and pure Worcestershire sauce. It's not nearly as salty as soy sauce, which I find hard to use in cooking anything NOT already calling for it in small amounts. The crock part cooking softens the meat, and absorbing the Worcestershire sauce (which is also pulling out some of the gaminess) tames the meat. I also use Worcestershire sauce to make wild game jerky for the same reason.
 
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