• You do not need to register if you are not going to pay the yearly fee to post. If you register please click here or log in go to "settings" then "my account" then "User Upgrades" and you can renew.

Fried turkey ??

Squatchsker

Offseason Cancelled
10 Year Member
I have used my smoker more lately, but I have also cooked a lot of different cuts in the fryer. Have you ever had "Fried Prime Rib"? Throw a rib roll in that bad boy. You will not be disappointed.
I have thought about it, but the idea of overcooking one scares me to tears.

I have the shelf for the basket, and have found that 5 lbs of chicken quarters fits perfectly. Great for feeding a gathering.
 

NU_Alum

All American
5 Year Member
Inject it with a hot sauce mix and use a jerk seasoning on the outside. It comes out amazing.
 

PasadenaHusker

Just A Fan
5 Year Member
Up until recently I have smoked, then fried my turkeys. My smoker died, so I am now shopping.

I would smoke the bird on really low heat for about 4 hours, then finish it in the big easy. Best of both worlds.
I heard that somewhere else as well, and am going to give it a go next year.
 

WestTexasHusker

Varsity
5 Year Member
I have used my smoker more lately, but I have also cooked a lot of different cuts in the fryer. Have you ever had "Fried Prime Rib"? Throw a rib roll in that bad boy. You will not be disappointed.
Ok dumb question probably, but what about a roast in one of those oil-less fryers? Would that be a somewhat similar outcome to the prime rib?

And if you do the prime rib, is this something you could comfortably count on getting “right” the first time, without practice? We are having 10 house guests at one time right after Xmas and I am considering my options.

One night, I’m just going to get a pan of Olive Garden lasagne. But I’d like to cook something the second night?
 
Last edited:

PasadenaHusker

Just A Fan
5 Year Member
Ok dumb question probably, but what about a roast in one of those oil-less fryers? Would that be a somewhat similar outcome to the prime rib?

And if you do the prime rib, is this something you could comfortably count on getting “right” the first time, without practice? We are having 10 house guests at one time right after Xmas and I am considering my options.

One night, I’m just going to get a pan of Olive Garden lasagne. But I’d like to cook something the second night?
The first time I did a rib roll, it came out perfect! Nice and crispy on the outside, and medium rare on the inside. I can check when i get home from work, and send the recipe i followed. It really is all about getting the internal temperature of the meat to where you want it. I have never done a roast, but I imagine it would be very similar in how it turns out.
 

WestTexasHusker

Varsity
5 Year Member
The first time I did a rib roll, it came out perfect! Nice and crispy on the outside, and medium rare on the inside. I can check when i get home from work, and send the recipe i followed. It really is all about getting the internal temperature of the meat to where you want it. I have never done a roast, but I imagine it would be very similar in how it turns out.
Wow this would be so helpful! I think I might head out and buy one of these oil less friars for myself for Christmas !
 
Last edited:

PasadenaHusker

Just A Fan
5 Year Member
Wow this would be so helpful! I think I might head out and buy one of these oil less friars for myself for Christmas !
Here is the recipe that I used as a basis. I used my own homemade rub, but this should give you a good idea. I think it typically takes about 15 minutes per pound, as long as the roll is room temp before you put it in the fryer.
 

PasadenaHusker

Just A Fan
5 Year Member
Thank you! We don’t really like our meat rare, but more medium. Does that ruin a prime rib attempting to do that?
If all your guests prefer medium, then cook it to medium. We always do medium rare, and then those who prefer medium or done, we typically heat a pan of au jus, and cook the medium rare cuts to however the others want it. It will not ruin a prime rib to cook it to medium. My rub is a basic salt, pepper, onion powder, and garlic powder. I have also just used Misty's seasoning as well. The key is to make sure you get a thin coat of oil over it before you season it. This gives it a nice crisp outside, and locks in all the juicy goodies inside. I did confirm that it is about 15 minutes per pound, and I did a 10 pound roll once. Let me know if you have any other questions, and I would be happy to answer.
 
Last edited:

Squatchsker

Offseason Cancelled
10 Year Member
I know this will cook a nice turkey but earlier this year our friends tried to cook one on a chilly windy day and the bird never got done. Luckily there was a lot of other food to eat.
I have cooked one when it was 20 degrees out. It takes a little extra time. Did they run out of propane?
 
Top