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Federation of Fellow Fly-Fishing Football Fanatics

It appears there is a number of Husker Max folks who share my passions for football and fly fishing. Since we were taking over another thread, it seems like a good idea to start another thread for all things related to fly fishing over here instead. I mostly agree with Fonzie that I haven't met a lot of idiots while fly fishing. If you're not a fly fisherman, you're still welcome here, too, because you're probably fly-curious, and we can probably talk you into a lifetime vow of poverty by taking up fly fishing and then fly tying. Since we're all Huskers fans, you're welcome to bring football into the thread, obviously, but leave the politics out, please.

Pick a topic and go with it, or else I'll just keep posting memes to keep the thread going.
  • Fish pics = got any? Here's my daughter from a couple years back with a crappie she caught on a fly that she made out of her broken pink silicone hair scrunchy:
    Pink fly.jpg

  • Got any memes?

    Pleasure Room.jpg

  • Got a favorite fly?

    Mohair Leech.jpg

  • Got a dream destination?

    24664

  • Funny stories?
  • How did you get started?
  • Favorite places?
  • Fly fishing/tying video links?
I'll add more if you suggest them.
 
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Red Dead Redemption

Baba Yaga
5 Year Member
I wish I could contribute. My grandfather was an avid fly fisherman; had a big collection and an elaborate setup in his den for tying flies. But he died before I got to know him, and none of his kids or grandkids became interested in it. But there's hope in the next generation. One of my nephews is an avid fly fisherman (he grew up in Montana near Kalispell; lucky guy...)
 
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Cyberbach

Founding Father
15 Year Member
Waaay back in the early 70's I'm a Boy Scout doing the Phil mount challenge in New Mexico. We were up in the mountains half way thru a 2 week trek when we encountered a fly fishing camp. We spent a full day there where they had stations set up so we could lean to make our fly... it was a blast and then when we got done they set us up with freaking bamboo poles to whip our fly back and forth and I'll be damned if I didn't catch a couple. It was the best meal I had the whole time I was there. I think I made a total of 6 fly and only lost one due to a snag over the years until I got home late one night fishing and left my trunk open while I cleaned the fish and someone stole my tackle box out of the trunk.... still miss those fly.
 
I got home late one night fishing and left my trunk open while I cleaned the fish and someone stole my tackle box out of the trunk
Where did that happen? On fly fishing discussion boards, there are apparently a lot of thieves who hang out near parking areas and target guys with high-end gear. I don't have any of the higher-end rods or reels, but there are a lot of guys who are sporting $1,000+ in a single fly rod and reel setup, so it attracts the thieves. I've also known some folks who have had their bass gear cleaned out, and some of that stuff is even more expensive yet when you factor in the cost of all of the lures.
 

ksuhusker

In a tree somewhere
5 Year Member
Unfortunately I cannot contribute any stories or experiences, I have tried to fly fish only once and it was with my son, we went from fly fishing to traditional fishing. Eagle River in Eagle/Vail Colorado. We had never caught a brown trout before, once we figured out that we should have hired a guide...we busted out our 7' spinning reel rods. We bought a couple dozen nightcrawlers with tiny Gamagatsu hooks and a spilt shot 18" up. It may be frowned upon from traditional fly fisherman but we tore them up. Just flipped it out into fast water and let it trickle down deep, watching the line was the only way to know a fish was hitting.
 

CrabHusker

Alienating everyone, one post at a time.
5 Year Member
So my path to the world of fly fishing for me started in late May or early June of 1975. My dad was a spin fisherman and we fished for brown, brook, rainbow and cutthroat trout almost entirely in the free stone rivers of Colorado and Wyoming from the time I was old enough to walk, cast and not fall in the river. Well, he fished, I got lures caught on rocks, brush, myself and occasionally in the mouths of fish. By 1975 I had gotten halfway decent at casting a lure, knowing where to cast and hooking and landing trout. I had a marginal understanding of where they'd congregate and how to present a lure to get a fish to bite. The rest was just magic at that point, but nothing as magical as the first time I watched my older cousin fly fish.

Around this same timeframe my dad and I really started getting into backpacking into some of Colorado and Wyomings high mountain lakes and my cousin suggested one of his favorites. While lake fishing wasn't either of our favorite ways to spend a day, the scenery was always spectacular and the fishing had been surprisingly good, often catching some 2 or 3 pound Brook or Cutthroat trout in lakes that didn't receive much in the way of fishing pressure. My cousins suggestion was sweetened by pictures (of the 110 variety) of a half dozen fat, colorful Cutthroat trout and stories of being the only guy on the lake. That settled it, we were in.

Weather and a later start than was desired put us at the lake in mid afternoon and after setting up camp and gathering fire wood, we hit the lake for a bit before the sun set. This is where the magic started for me. A high mountain lake, with snow still on the peaks in the backdrop, the sun setting and my cousin casting a fly that he tied to rising trout. I was hooked. He caught and released several nice sized fish, keeping the last for his dinner. The casts he made were something to watch and to this day I don't know that I've seen another fly caster that was his equal. He could cast all the fly line and some of the backing and still present a dry fly better than I could on a 20' cast. He made his own rods, tied his own flies and was as cool as the other side of the pillow. I had to do what he did, though to this day I've not met he equal on the river or at the tying table.

It took me the rest of that summer mowing lawns and that next winter shoveling driveways, but the next Spring I bought my own Pflueger fly rod and reel. Later that month was my birthday and my folks sprung for a Cabela's Beginers Fly Tying kit and I was off to the races. Every bit of money I made over the next two or three years went into fly fishing or fly tying accessories and materials. My tying advanced quicker than my casting did (if my dad was still alive he would confirm this), but I caught fish the first year. Not at the rate or the size that I did as a spin fisherman, but it didn't matter to me. I'd never wanted to do something that bad in my life and damned if I wasn't doing it. The thing I was most proud of as a kid is that it was all self taught. Other than watching my cousin cast when he'd join us on a trip once every year or two or reading his Jack Dennis fly tying books, I had no training at all. It was all trial and error. What worked and what didn't. It took years and I mean years.

As the years passed I'd buy more or better tying materials, better line, maybe a new vest to replace the old hand me down my cousin gave me. I learned more and more about how to present a fly, what fly to present when and how different each stream and hatch could be. We fished the Arkansas, Blue, Colorado, Eagle, Frying Pan, Gunnison, Roaring Fork and dozens of other little streams in Colorado. Trips to Wyoming put me on some of the legendary streams in Yellowstone. The Madison, Firehole, North Platte, Snake and more. I got better and better at tying, casting and catching but the one thing that never changed was my fascination with world that was just under the shinning, glossy surface of that ice cold water.

Family, work and moving to the South had taken much of my fire away, but I have to say the discussion on this board about fly fishing has brought a lot of it back. I'd already carved out a corner of my attic office for a tying table that only needs it's top to be ready to go. My materials are still in order and tools at the ready. I've never been a big spender when it comes to rods, reels or line, but I guess I'll have to break all of that out and see where I stand.

This fall...I'll be standing in a trout stream somewhere nearby, casting a fly to a trout who has no idea who Jack Dennis is and has never seen the beauty of my cousins casts.
 
Unfortunately I cannot contribute any stories or experiences, I have tried to fly fish only once and it was with my son, we went from fly fishing to traditional fishing. Eagle River in Eagle/Vail Colorado. We had never caught a brown trout before, once we figured out that we should have hired a guide...we busted out our 7' spinning reel rods. We bought a couple dozen nightcrawlers with tiny Gamagatsu hooks and a spilt shot 18" up. It may be frowned upon from traditional fly fisherman but we tore them up. Just flipped it out into fast water and let it trickle down deep, watching the line was the only way to know a fish was hitting.
I started my kids fishing the same way, and I still carry a jar of salmon eggs as my emergency backup plan for when the trout are too stupid to eat my flies. :thumbsup: I use a fly rod almost all of the time when trout fishing, so on those occasions when I do pull out the salmon eggs, I'm that rarest of rare creatures: a guy using a fly fishing outfit to fish with bait.
 
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