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Coronavirus Status Updates

Voice Of Reason

Scout Team
5 Year Member
Getting this thread back on more of an “updates” topic...

Interesting JAMA article looking at some of the longer-term impacts of those who have recovered from Covid. At this stage, it’s hard to get much data on “long-term” since this virus hasn’t existed among humans for a year yet, but the preliminary findings are fascinating.

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2771581
A lot of people are down playing the danger because there is a good chance you won’t die from it. The same can be said for Russian roulette. At least with Russian roulette there aren’t any long term affects to worry about.
 

Sandhills Husker

Red Shirt
5 Year Member
A lot of people are down playing the danger because there is a good chance you won’t die from it. The same can be said for Russian roulette. At least with Russian roulette there aren’t any long term affects to worry about.
Not only isn’t it extremely likely “you won’t die from it”, it is very likely any symptoms would be minimal or non-existent.
 

Chi-Town Cube

Riding the pine
10 Year Member
Not only isn’t it extremely likely “you won’t die from it”, it is very likely any symptoms would be minimal or non-existent.
That's correct, but it spreads like wildfire and enough people get really sick that it strains healthcare resources. Wanton disregard for COVID leads to uncontrolled spread. We've had to suspend elective procedures that require post-procedure inpatient monitoring because of our current situation.

Right now, we have about 10 people in the ICU with COVID. That accounts for about a third of our medical ICU. Not a one of the patients is over 60. It's an outlier, yes, and we are a tertiary care center with ECMO so we are more likely to get patients where heroic measures are appropriate, but the point is that every adult has a chance of winning the COVID lottery. For most healthy adults, that risk is low enough you shouldn't live in perpetual fear, but respectful enough to realize that you number could get called for severe COVID. Likewise, complete disregard for the severity of COVID increases the risk of overwhelming outbreaks and spread to more vulnerable populations who might have a higher than 1% risk of severe disease.

As long as we have the capacity to care for people, things are OK. But, we need people to be partners in this. Take personal responsibility to use common sense and help mitigate spread. Wear a mask, distance, don't congregate, and practice good hygiene. Take the minimal steps needed to allow for a "controlled burn" with COVID so we aren't forced to take drastic measures.
 

BigMacHusker

Travel Squad
10 Year Member
A lot of people are down playing the danger because there is a good chance you won’t die from it. The same can be said for Russian roulette. At least with Russian roulette there aren’t any long term affects to worry about.
Except you are 100x more likely to die playing Russian roulette. Are other people downplaying it or are you overplaying it?
 

BleedinHuskerRed

Red Shirt
5 Year Member
BleedinHusker

If the mask can't keep the virus OUT, it probably can't keep the virus IN either :).

Yes, I know about droplets... But the CDC also admitted that the virus is airborne via aerosols which can escape around all but professionally fitted N95 masks so once again, masks really have no value for any viral illnesses.

For Bacteria, much larger organisms, they can play a role when worn by people who are contagious (TB for example) but the extremely small size of viruses make facial coverings of no value.

Doctors, like me have known that in a viral pandemic, with high mortality (NOT Covid) if we were going to treat patients and not die ourselves we would need full biohazard or MOPP Level 4 suits and proper protocols to use them.

All the best.

PS: Your "explanation" doesn't make sense. If with the mask on, and you are still spewing out aerosolized virus then you are still spreading contagion!! Yeah it maybe less but it means you are still contagious and I for one feel you should be out of the public space rather than "wearing a mask" and acting like all is well!
Follow-up: I talked with my family member again to make sure I understood correctly. She confirmed that moisture is the key to masks’ efficacy in preventing spread to others. Viruses don’t survive well in dry air, and MOST of the virus is contained in water droplets, which a mask would hold. It’s not perfect, but they do help reduce the amount of the virus available in the air and on surfaces.

So, that is how they’re able to help keep the virus IN, even if they don’t do a good job keeping it OUT.
 

BleedinHuskerRed

Red Shirt
5 Year Member
A lot of people are down playing the danger because there is a good chance you won’t die from it. The same can be said for Russian roulette. At least with Russian roulette there aren’t any long term affects to worry about.
Something I’d like to point out from the article specifically, those suffering from long-term issues from Covid-19 includes “26% among those aged 18-34 years (n = 85).”

Again, this is preliminary data. But this study provides evidence that even though it’s highly unlikely that younger adults will die from Covid-19, there may be long-term repercussions for them.
 

Huskerwisdom

Red Shirt
Something I’d like to point out from the article specifically, those suffering from long-term issues from Covid-19 includes “26% among those aged 18-34 years (n = 85).”

Again, this is preliminary data. But this study provides evidence that even though it’s highly unlikely that younger adults will die from Covid-19, there may be long-term repercussions for them.

"There is no doubt that acute #COVID19 can lead to short- and long-term sequelae, as does any other severe infection. Though, such low-quality studies with no control group, no denominator reported and no clarity over enrolment criteria are scientifically utterly useless. "
 

BleedinHuskerRed

Red Shirt
5 Year Member

"There is no doubt that acute #COVID19 can lead to short- and long-term sequelae, as does any other severe infection. Though, such low-quality studies with no control group, no denominator reported and no clarity over enrolment criteria are scientifically utterly useless. "
An understandable stance; as I said, the data is preliminary. Lots of data floating around out there, which is why I try to pull my info from peer-reviewed, reputable journals. (Not perfect, but one of our best resources available.)
 

Husker Country Doc

Heisman
15 Year Member
Since we're comparing I wanted to go back to this article to compare some more.

Deaths in the U.S. are 29% higher than even in Sweden, "which ignored everything for so long," Emanuel says. Sweden made a point of refusing to order strict social restrictions and never went in to a full lockdown. "We have 29% more mortality than we should have if we'd followed Sweden's path and Sweden virtually did nothing."

Notice how they say our deaths are 29% higher then Sweden.

But according to this from John Hopkins, the deaths per 100,000 are about the same.

Sweden’s overall death rate — that is, the percent of those infected who die from coronavirus — sits at roughly 5.9% with roughly 58 deaths per 100,000 residents, compared to America’s death rate of 2.7% with 66 deaths per 100,000 residents, according to Johns Hopkins University. Swedish deaths per 100,000 people is lower than Italy (60 deaths), Spain (70 deaths) and the U.K. (65 deaths), according to Johns Hopkins.

So as we can see the US deaths per 100,000 are similar to Sweden, Italy, Spain, and the UK.

Here's another way to play with numbers so you can get the results you want.

The rate of COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. since June 7 is 27.2 per 100,000 people. In contrast, in Italy, the death rate is down to 3.1 per 100,000.

Comparing 27.2 deaths per 100,000 to 3.1 looks bad, but then you notice it says since June, and we all know Italy was hit very hard early. So we go back up to Johns Hopkins University numbers and see the deaths per 100,000 is US 66, Italy 60, very similar.

Sorry, but whenever I see someone wanting to compare country to country and Covid deaths, I figure there has to be an agenda. Let's show somebody is doing it wrong. And when that someone is NPR, well we all know where they stand especially this year.
I can't back it up, but I think the US has had such a worse problem with COVID than other countries, is because we have a higher rate of overweight and obesity, and the comorbidities that go with that extra weight (htn, CAD, high chol, DM2, etc).

(on a side note, I ain't so good with words)
 
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Husker Country Doc

Heisman
15 Year Member
I think it’s absolutely incredible that, once again, our main stream media simply is quoting case numbers with no context or even mention of truly important statistics.

Just throwing out big numbers as if we are 3rd graders....

When I just took a look at a compilation of news articles put together by Apple News on my iPhone there were 6 different stories on ”Virus is Spiking in US!”

Yet not one puts this in context....The kids are back in school In so many locations. Elementary, Middle, HS and College. Should this be a big surprise to everyone that case numbers increase?

AND...is this an emerging problem with this “increase”?

Hell I don’t know because they don’t ever mention the TRUE stats that (to me) really matter except total deaths.

Total Deaths from Covid 19.... have they increased by a substantial amount?
Number of Hospitalizations....have they increased by a substantial amount?
Number of Beds Available.....have they decreased by a substantial amount?
Number of ICU Beds Available.... have they decreased by a substantial amount?
Number of Ventilators Available.... have they decreased by a substantial amount?
Percent of Hospital Capacity In Use.... has it increased by a substantial amount?
Percent of Staff Available.... has it decreased by a substantial amount?
Treatment Medications......... have they decreased by a substantial amount?
Quantities of PPE.... have they decreased by a substantial amount?

TL : DR
I frankly am beyond just seeing the stupid headlines about “major jumps“ and ”spikes” and ”outbreaks”. And it should come as no surprise to anyone with any common sense that case numbers would rise if the kids go back to school. What I want to know is can our medical facilities deal with it? Which to me is the absolute most important issue.

But the press continues to want to treat me as a simpleton. Sigh....
As of today:
  • 166 out of 410 med surge beds available (60% in use)
  • 18 out of 62 ICU beds available (~71 % in use)
  • 66 inpatient COVID positives, 4 PUIs (13.9% of hospitalized pts are hosp'd with COVID)
  • 10 vents in use out of 88, 6 for COVID patients (78 vents available)
This is in Central, and South Central, NE (Two Rivers Public Health District)
 

Chi-Town Cube

Riding the pine
10 Year Member
As of today:
  • 166 out of 410 med surge beds available (60% in use)
  • 18 out of 62 ICU beds available (~71 % in use)
  • 66 inpatient COVID positives, 4 PUIs (13.9% of hospitalized pts are hosp'd with COVID)
  • 10 vents in use out of 88, 6 for COVID patients (78 vents available)
This is in Central, and South Central, NE (Two Rivers Public Health District)
We aren't doing as well in Wisconsin, but hanging in. 50% of our medical service patients are COVID. 1/3 of our MICU.

Totaling about 60 patients (and rising, was 20 patients 10 days ago). We have no beds and have suspended elective cases that are anticipated to need a bed. But, we are almost always a full hospital anyway. Its just 60 COVIDs are 60 other people that can't get in for other conditions. I'm not in a particularly hard hit part of Wisconsin, yet. Some of the rural hospitals are on the brink of needing to utilize the field hospital in Milwaukee. It not just beds (I saw a story where Aspirus system in Northern Wisconsin has about 80 patients with COVID), they are having staff get sick.

Going to be an interesting couple of weeks
 

BleedinHuskerRed

Red Shirt
5 Year Member
As of today:
  • 166 out of 410 med surge beds available (60% in use)
  • 18 out of 62 ICU beds available (~71 % in use)
  • 66 inpatient COVID positives, 4 PUIs (13.9% of hospitalized pts are hosp'd with COVID)
  • 10 vents in use out of 88, 6 for COVID patients (78 vents available)
This is in Central, and South Central, NE (Two Rivers Public Health District)
I’m hearing that hospitals across NE are bracing for even higher numbers and trying to bring in additional traveling staff... is that what you are seeing?
 
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