• You do not need to register if you are not going to pay the yearly fee to post. If you register please click here or log in go to "settings" then "my account" then "User Upgrades" and you can renew.

Carnegie Hall 1938 concert

EastOfEden

Scout Team
10 Year Member
I just had occasion to once again listen to "Sing, Sing, Sing" from the 1938 Carnegie Hall concert of the Benny Goodman orchestra. I suppose for those of this era, it's not much, but to us of many eras, it's right up near the top. That band featured Goodman on clarinet, Gene Krupa on Drums, Harry James on trumpet, Lionel Hampton on vibes, with guest appearances during the concert by Count Basie and his orchestra. The concert was precedent shattering. Sing, Sing, Sing stands out to this day as the measuring stick for the very best big band jazz of that era.
 

Prairie Sage

Red Shirt
10 Year Member
The most amazing thing, to me, about that recording is it was one microphone hanging above the stage with two guys running disc cutters (this is before tape). Benny insisted on having rehearsal time in Carnegie Hall before the concert so the band was familiar with the acoustics and stage set-up. Also in that band were Teddy Wilson and Jess Stacy. Teddy Wilson and Hampton only appeared in the small group setting with Stacy playing piano with the entire band.

The Duke Ellington Concerts of the 1940s, also from Carnegie Hall are also great. Particularly the 1943 concert where the Ellington band premiered Black, Brown, and Beige, in its only public performance. Also interesting is the Star Spangled Banner played by the Ellington band.

Finally East, I know you are a reader so here's a link to a piece about Benny Goodman:

http://www.billcrowbass.com/billcrowbass.com/To_Russia_Without_Love.html

Benny was not well liked by a lot of musicians who played with and for him. Although a different perspective on Benny was given by Terry Gibbs who played in his band and small groups in the 50s and 60s. Terry maintains that Benny wasn't nearly as spiteful and mean as most people thought, he was just so absorbed in playing the clarinet that he was basically incredibly inept when it came to dealing with people. But that still doesn't explain taking solo time away from artists on tour who got more applause than Benny did.
 

Blue Howl

Drink up, Shriner!
5 Year Member
I believe here is a link.....my foot was tapping as I listened!
 
Last edited:

Prairie Sage

Red Shirt
10 Year Member
Sing, Sing, Sing (With a Swing) was written by Louis Prima, most famous for his lounge act in Las Vegas in the 50's and 60s.

 

CO4NU

Travel Squad
5 Year Member
Rafael Mendez..........

Also Harry James......

Great trumpet players.

image.png
 

Huskerwisdom

Red Shirt
2 Year Member
Really interesting. I'll definitely listen to this later.

A few years ago, my wife and I and some friends saw a big concert with the Chicago Jazz Orchestra, one of the few big bands left in the country. They paired with Kurt Elling and a few other vocalists. It's incredible to hear that music done with a band of the right size and depth and talent.
 

Farmer Jake

Recruit
2 Year Member
I just had occasion to once again listen to "Sing, Sing, Sing" from the 1938 Carnegie Hall concert of the Benny Goodman orchestra. I suppose for those of this era, it's not much, but to us of many eras, it's right up near the top. That band featured Goodman on clarinet, Gene Krupa on Drums, Harry James on trumpet, Lionel Hampton on vibes, with guest appearances during the concert by Count Basie and his orchestra. The concert was precedent shattering. Sing, Sing, Sing stands out to this day as the measuring stick for the very best big band jazz of that era.
This concert predates me by 20 some years, but I still love the Big Band and Swing era. Miller is still my overall favorite, followed closely by Sir Duke. We had a drummer in high school that Krupa would have been proud of. He would do drum solos during halftime of basketball games and always got a standing ovation.
 
Top