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Any updates on Coach Dewitt?

ColombianHusker

Throw the damn bones!
2 Year Member
Good luck with the Chantex, it makes you crazy with bad thoughts and dreams but it works. My wife used Chantex to quit and hated it, but she stuck with it. She is now smoke free for over 12 years, still craves it when she smells it though.



C
Good for her. I could only add that cigarette was NEVER craved after I quit. Stuff smells worse than stale bong water:eek:
 

denisonred

Junior Varsity
10 Year Member
I do too. It’s a tough one to quit. I did it 20 yrs before switching to nicotine gum. Been at the gum for 2 yrs now. Doc, you know if there’s less or similar risks of cancer with the gum vs. chew?
I was impressed by major league baseball players chewing. Tried it once slid into home and swallowed the tobacco . That eneded my chewing.
 

Californication

Travel Squad
10 Year Member
Quitting is highly personal. What works for one may not work for another. I was both an addict and habit smoker. When I quit, my body tingled for almost a month. I tried many things; and in the end found out "want to" and determination were the key. Other things can help, but there will be weak moments when the only thing between you and your nicotine is desire to quit. Those moments can last up to two years; just become much less frequent. Respect to those that have quit and good luck to everyone trying to quit; it truly is the hardest thing I have ever accomplished.
 

HuskerNash

Recruit
2 Year Member
Quitting is highly personal. What works for one may not work for another. I was both an addict and habit smoker. When I quit, my body tingled for almost a month. I tried many things; and in the end found out "want to" and determination were the key. Other things can help, but there will be weak moments when the only thing between you and your nicotine is desire to quit. Those moments can last up to two years; just become much less frequent. Respect to those that have quit and good luck to everyone trying to quit; it truly is the hardest thing I have ever accomplished.
Next week will be week 4 for me. I am out of the Chantex and thinking about filling another prescription. I have found this to be the hardest week so far and I am not sure why. I've got that tingling feeling this week that you mentioned and the last two days I really wanted a smoke but my willpower won out. Honestly I enjoyed smoking but I'm in my early 50's, I am divorced with an 8 year old that lives with me a bit more than half time, his mom was diagnosed with MS and has some real bad days, and he asked me to quit. I am doing it totally for him and my two older boys who had given up on me ever quitting. The request gets far more personal when you think of the possible future issues with his mother's MS and me smoking. There was no way I was going to roll that dice any longer.
 

AzHusker

All Big 10
10 Year Member
he asked me to quit. I am doing it totally for him and my two older boys.
Good for you, dad. I think making it "personal" like you have is the key. It's not just you alone in this thing...you'd expect your young one to quit smoking if he was dabbling with it - turnabout is fair when it's family.

Day by day...
 
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EastOfEden

Scout Team
10 Year Member
My wife was a two packis a day person and decided to quit when we decided to have a fourth child. She did not want to take the chance that smoking might affect the unborn kid, plus she began to see the habit as a weakness in her and she hated having a weakness. She used Smokenders, a group ten step over ten weeks project, and at the end, she never had another cigarette and except for the first couple of months, never had the slighteset desire to have a cigarette again. Things like chantex weren't around then I believe.

So it does happen - people quit. and you will too.
 

Red Crawdad

Varsity
10 Year Member
Next week will be week 4 for me. I am out of the Chantex and thinking about filling another prescription. I have found this to be the hardest week so far and I am not sure why. I've got that tingling feeling this week that you mentioned and the last two days I really wanted a smoke but my willpower won out. Honestly I enjoyed smoking but I'm in my early 50's, I am divorced with an 8 year old that lives with me a bit more than half time, his mom was diagnosed with MS and has some real bad days, and he asked me to quit. I am doing it totally for him and my two older boys who had given up on me ever quitting. The request gets far more personal when you think of the possible future issues with his mother's MS and me smoking. There was no way I was going to roll that dice any longer.
Chantix binds to the same receptors as nicotine, but only gives a partial response relative to nicotine.The thought process in the drug discovery phase was that if people don't experience the full effects from smoking while taking Chantix, it would allow people to more easily wean themselves off nicotine addiction, with reduced withdrawal symptoms. You should talk to your doctor, going over when the cravings came back strong, and whether to keep going with Chantix or try something else.

A good friend of mine was on the discovery chemistry team that discovered Chantix. It's not a perfect drug by any means (there is no such thing), but for her to know that it helps 20% of people who take it quit smoking is her greatest life achievement.
 
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berryhusker

Travel Squad
10 Year Member
Good luck with the Chantex, it makes you crazy with bad thoughts and dreams but it works. My wife used Chantex to quit and hated it, but she stuck with it. She is now smoke free for over 12 years, still craves it when she smells it though.

C
I had a very close friend who had some mental health problems who tried quitting using Chantex. He went into a severe manic phase and almost committed suicide. I don't know what the side effects are but his experience obviously was concerning. I'm sure his situation is incredibly rare. Wellbutrin (Buproprion) an anti-depressant actually helps reduce the cravings and can help people quit using tobacco products. It worked for me when I was taking it. Minimal side effects too.
 
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