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Another Garrett!

Discoverer27

Red Shirt
2 Year Member
Laughed when I saw this because of his last name. Both sets of my grandparents and thus my mom and dad were from Sutton. Spent a lot of summers there back in the 70s. Was funny because everyone in the area has the last name of Ochsner, Griess, or Nuss. Seriously.
 
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TnHusker87

Red Shirt
Laughed when I saw this because of his last name. Both sets of my grandparents and thus my mom and dad were from Sutton. Spent a lot of summers there back in the 70s. Was funny because everyone in the area has the last name of Ochsner, Griess, or Nuss. Seriously.
Yep, about 3/4 of my paternal family tree came through Sutton, many of them Germans from Russia.
 

Discoverer27

Red Shirt
2 Year Member
Yep, about 3/4 of my paternal family tree came through Sutton, many of them Germans from Russia.
Yep. One set of my great great grandparents were germans from russia. Lore is that that is who brought over the runza. Runza Huts founder's mom was from Sutton I believe.
 
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TnHusker87

Red Shirt
Germans from RUSSIA?
Yes, large numbers of Germans immigrated from the German states to the lower Volga & Black Sea area (Ukraine & Crimea) beginning in the 1700s at the behest of Czarina Catherine the Great resulting in autonomous colonies with freedoms of religion, exercise native languages, land and no compulsory service in the Russian armies. By the 1870s, the Czar changed the rules and a mass exodus to America began.

Sutton, Nebraska was a gathering point for many thousands who then fanned out across the plains. A North Dakota historian once claimed that more than half the states population came from this immigration source.
 
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Discoverer27

Red Shirt
2 Year Member
Yes, large numbers of Germans immigrated from the German states to the lower Volga & Black Sea area (Ukraine & Crimea) beginning in the 1700s at the behest of Czarina Catherine the Great resulting in autonomous colonies with freedoms of religion, exercise native languages, land and no compulsory service in the Russian armies. By the 1870s, the Czar changed the rules and a mass exodus to America began.

Sutton, Nebraska was a gathering point for many thousands who then fanned out across the plains. A North Dakota historian once claimed that more than half the states population came from this immigration source.
Agree. I think the tipping point was that Catherine said they wouldn't have to serve in the russian military and then russia began conscripting them.
 

TnHusker87

Red Shirt
Agree. I think the tipping point was that Catherine said they wouldn't have to serve in the russian military and then russia began conscripting them.
Yep, that was a significant consideration -- of course, those that came to America donated their sons & grandsons to service in the World Wars.
 

carrolltonsker

Husker Immortal
10 Year Member
Germans from RUSSIA?
Let me add one more tidbit. The Germans from Russia are my ancestry on both my mother's and father's side. My maternal grandparents both immigrated from Russia in the early 1900s, and my mother, under Russian law, was considered a Russian citizen, even though she never was close to stepping foot in Russia, since she was a first generation offspring of immigrants from Russia.
 
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