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altitude

MadRat

Red Shirt
2 Year Member
You shouldn't really have to breathe deeper, just exhale more vigorously. Inhaling deeper doesn't make the oxygen content any better, it just gives you a little more volume. It's the exhalation that we struggle with at the upper altitude, not so much the inhaling. The drained feeling you get in the higher altitudes is a build up of lactic acid because your inhalation is less efficient. When people strap on oxygen they decrease the gradient, which improves carbon dioxide removal from the lungs.
 

inthedeed

Red Shirt
5 Year Member
There's a little effect, but it really doesn't matter. Whether it made no difference or all the difference doesn't change anything or excuse anything and doesn't mean the rest of the season will be easier. Team just needs to play better overall.

I say this as a 20 year resident. Colorado is higher than other states. People say "You must be high," to me all the time. I am. I'm high on life. :Biggrin:
i refer to most coloradians as lowlanders
 

Full Husker

Recruit
5 Year Member
If the altitude was a problem, I think it was the officials who suffered from it. There were at least three major missed or wrong calls===on the CU big run up the middle in the fourth quarter, the tv showed clearly a CU player grab Honas's arm and spin him away from the playn (not called), more outrageous the penalty (wrong) for substitution with less than a minute to go, and the overtime field goal, when the game clock ran out on CU (not called) . I guess these horrendous calls and non calls can be explained by officials catching their breath and not watching the play.
 

Pops

I have squandered my resistance
10 Year Member
You shouldn't really have to breathe deeper, just exhale more vigorously. Inhaling deeper doesn't make the oxygen content any better, it just gives you a little more volume. It's the exhalation that we struggle with at the upper altitude, not so much the inhaling. The drained feeling you get in the higher altitudes is a build up of lactic acid because your inhalation is less efficient. When people strap on oxygen they decrease the gradient, which improves carbon dioxide removal from the lungs.
Oh no. I’ve been high in the Rockies and trust me. You have to breathe deeper
 

MadRat

Red Shirt
2 Year Member
If the altitude was a problem, I think it was the officials who suffered from it. There were at least three major missed or wrong calls===on the CU big run up the middle in the fourth quarter, the tv showed clearly a CU player grab Honas's arm and spin him away from the playn (not called), more outrageous the penalty (wrong) for substitution with less than a minute to go, and the overtime field goal, when the game clock ran out on CU (not called) . I guess these horrendous calls and non calls can be explained by officials catching their breath and not watching the play.
Beginning of the 3rd Q, that holding call on Jack Stoll was absolutely a phantom call. I don't trust that white hat at the game. Looks squirrelly.
 

Elwood von Kiowa

Grad Assistant
5 Year Member
If the altitude was a problem, I think it was the officials who suffered from it. There were at least three major missed or wrong calls===on the CU big run up the middle in the fourth quarter, the tv showed clearly a CU player grab Honas's arm and spin him away from the playn (not called), more outrageous the penalty (wrong) for substitution with less than a minute to go, and the overtime field goal, when the game clock ran out on CU (not called) . I guess these horrendous calls and non calls can be explained by officials catching their breath and not watching the play.
I had the same thought during the game. Those B1G officials weren't prepared for the altitude, and their decision-making skills were clearly affected.

Edit: Just to be clear, not blaming the loss on that. Although the lack of a holding call on CU's last TD pass was a game changer.
 
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solesrfr

Travel Squad
5 Year Member
You shouldn't really have to breathe deeper, just exhale more vigorously. Inhaling deeper doesn't make the oxygen content any better, it just gives you a little more volume. It's the exhalation that we struggle with at the upper altitude, not so much the inhaling. The drained feeling you get in the higher altitudes is a build up of lactic acid because your inhalation is less efficient. When people strap on oxygen they decrease the gradient, which improves carbon dioxide removal from the lungs.
This video talks about proper breathing and at the end he talks about the Bohr effect. You want to raise CO2 concentration in the blood with proper breathing. This actually decreases the blood PH and thus the hemoglobin proteins release their load of oxygen into the cells. You want controlled, diaphragmatic breathing, if you are exhaling to much CO2 you mess with the Bohr effect in a negative way.


Here is a longer video with an interview of Colin Clayton who has 15 years in the health industry where they talk about proper breathing and the health effects on the body.




C
 

MadRat

Red Shirt
2 Year Member
I think you misunderstand what he's saying. He's not saying that you need to take in more air, he's demonstrating the cleaning out more of the lungs. If you do not utilize breathing technique the air stagnates in the lower areas of the lungs and you build up CO2. The Bohr effect he explained really poorly. You want less CO2, not a build up. The LACK of a buildup is what raises pH and the buildup lowers the pH. Lower pH is higher acidity, which starves you of oxygen. You want the opposite, an oxygen rich bloodstream! The buildup of CO2 is bad bad bad.
 

solesrfr

Travel Squad
5 Year Member
I think you misunderstand what he's saying. He's not saying that you need to take in more air, he's demonstrating the cleaning out more of the lungs. If you do not utilize breathing technique the air stagnates in the lower areas of the lungs and you build up CO2. The Bohr effect he explained really poorly. You want less CO2, not a build up. The LACK of a buildup is what raises pH and the buildup lowers the pH. Lower pH is higher acidity, which starves you of oxygen. You want the opposite, an oxygen rich bloodstream! The buildup of CO2 is bad bad bad.
I am not misunderstanding what he is saying and I am guessing you did not even watch the second video. Your statement that lower PH starves you of oxygen is not exactly true. If you are breathing properly you have plenty of oxygen. That lower PH is what unlocks the oxygen for delivery to the cells. Colin explains it very clearly. Obviously there is a balance and too much CO2 is poisonous but to little is a problem also. If you breath out to much and to fast through your mouth you will shift the other way and alkalize your blood which hinders the release of oxygen to the cells. That is what proper diaphragmatic breathing prevents and thus allows for oxygen to be unlocked from the hemoglobin.


"The Bohr effect enables the body to adapt to changing conditions and makes it possible to supply extra oxygen to tissues that need it the most. For example, when muscles are undergoing strenuous activity, they require large amounts of oxygen to conduct cellular respiration, which generates CO2 (and therefore HCO3− and H+) as byproducts. These waste products lower the pH of the blood, which increases oxygen delivery to the active muscles. "




C
 

Red October

Junior Varsity
5 Year Member
WE sucked so badly in the second half because they went to cruise control and were so surprized the first was so easy. It could not have been altitude problem but a tween the ears problem and everyone
 

MadRat

Red Shirt
2 Year Member
I am not misunderstanding what he is saying and I am guessing you did not even watch the second video.
You should realize that H+ is the prime mover of the Bohr effect, not CO2. But hey, what do I know because I only aced P&A. In the basic sense, hemoglobin is loaded with oxygen in the lungs and unloaded of oxygen in the metabolizing tissues. Lowering the affinity does not mean it 'unlocks it'. It doesn't even mean more of anything is delivered. It means the time between stages is lessened. The time of 'what' in this case is simply the rate of an individual hemoglobin molecule to absorb oxygen. Your lungs don't suddenly have more oxygen, nor does a deeper breath imply more oxygen is available to the blood. Your exhalation of carbonated oxides is the prime mover of your ability to uptake oxygen. No amount of Bohr effect gives you more oxygen that wouldn't already get there. You know what has a big impact than it easier to measure than the Bohr effect? Heart rate. Kidney bicarbonate synthesis. Blood pressure. Krebs. The oxyhaemoglobin types available. Other factors like carbon monoxide, which isn't so easy to break free from hemoglobin, greatly impact oxygen uptake. Bohr effect is on the grand scale minor, which is why it took so long for scientists to quantify.

Respiration boils down to moving carbonated oxides - preferably all of them - out so hemoglobin is available to move fresh oxygen in. With or without the Bohr effect, you are limited by your exhalation process. I guess you weren't hearing what they were actually telling you to do, which is improve exhalation Controlling the release of carbon dioxide is going to be what unlocks your potential at maximum effort. The Bohr effect you are so fond of is just a bit of icing on the cake. But the cake would taste just fine with or without it.
 
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