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4 Star (in-State) WR Zavier Betts N!

Skerfan

Recruit
I still don't understand why something can't be done this summer (in conjunction with next summer) to get this kid eligible. Can't tutors be hired now to prep him for the ACT/SAT and help get him through the classes needed? It's like we all know a train crash is coming but no one is doing anything to prevent it.
You have no idea if anything is being done or not. I find it hard to believe that the Nebraska coaches and Zavier Betts arent doing everything they can to get this fixed. Just because it is not public information on a message board doesn't mean things aren't being done.
 
I still don't understand why something can't be done this summer (in conjunction with next summer) to get this kid eligible. Can't tutors be hired now to prep him for the ACT/SAT and help get him through the classes needed? It's like we all know a train crash is coming but no one is doing anything to prevent it.
What if EVERYBODY sees the train crash coming, and EVERYBODY is trying to get you off the tracks, but YOU think that it's cool, you're fine, I'll just hang out on these train tracks for awhile longer.

The word was that he wasn't doing anything to improve his situation, even with layers of resources and people lined up to help him. You can't help those who don't help themselves.
 

djlhuskerfan

Junior Varsity
10 Year Member
Looks really good but if he doesn't qualify, he probably won't get to realize his potential. Doggone it!
 

Red Reign

Husker Immortal
10 Year Member
I still don't understand why something can't be done this summer (in conjunction with next summer) to get this kid eligible. Can't tutors be hired now to prep him for the ACT/SAT and help get him through the classes needed? It's like we all know a train crash is coming but no one is doing anything to prevent it.
The University can not hire anybody for a recruit/commit

His family/friends can

Most high schools already have Learning Centers etc to help kids like this

Most of all he has to want it and go that extra mile to make it happen

Finally he may have dug a hole that is to hard to get out of
 

carrolltonsker

Husker Immortal
10 Year Member
The University can not hire anybody for a recruit/commit

His family/friends can

Most high schools already have Learning Centers etc to help kids like this

Most of all he has to want it and go that extra mile to make it happen

Finally he may have dug a hole that is to hard to get out of
Yes RR, you are correct. I am a little surprised that there seems to be such little hope for him to be declared eligible since he has another year to meet the qualifying standards. Either the stories are being exaggerated, or he has dug a very deep hole.

I am also a little amused that so many people think that an ACT/SAT tutor can turn things around. I have tutored dozens of students who are preparing for the exam, primarily for the Math portion of the test. When I first meet with a student, I always ask the same question: "What is 7 times 9?" You would be shocked at how many students I work with break out in a cold sweat and immediately start looking for a calculator. At that point, I tell the parent that we all are wasting our time on exam tutoring. I also say that I will work with the child. but I will have to go back to 3rd and 4th grade level math and work my way through Algebra II to get them ready for the exam. If they don't know basic multiplication facts, they probably are weak with fractions, percentages, basic Algebra, etc.

You might be thinking, "How can a student continue to be passed year after year without learning anything?' That's a fair question. As a former teacher and school administrator I can say that there are basically two answers to that question. First, some teachers are just incompetent and pass everybody. The more likely answer, however, is that many administrators will fire a teacher that fails more than 20-25% of their students. That averages out to about 5-7 students per class. Most teachers have at least that many students in their lower level classes who do absolutely nothing. Many of those will fail unless they have a great deal of natural ability. However, the rest of the students will probably pass if the teacher wants to stay employed. Yes, it is sad.
 
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All 'N' 011808

Former Walk-on
2 Year Member
Yes RR, you are correct. I am a little surprised that there seems to be such little hope for him to be declared eligible since he has another year to meet the qualifying standards. Either the stories are being exaggerated, or he has dug a very deep hole.

I am also a little amused that so many people think that an ACT/SAT tutor can turn things around. I have tutored dozens of students who are preparing for the exam, primarily for the Math portion of the test. When I first meet with a student, I always ask the same question: "What is 7 times 9?" You would be shocked at how many students I work with break out in a cold sweat and immediately start looking for a calculator. At that point, I tell the parent that we all are wasting our time on exam tutoring. I also say that I will work with the child. but I will have to go back to 3rd and 4th grade level math and work my way through Algebra II to get them ready for the exam. If they don't know basic multiplication facts, they probably are weak with fractions, percentages, basic Algebra, etc.

You might be thinking, "How can a student continue to be passed year after year without learning anything?' That's a fair question. As a former teacher and school administrator I can say that there are basically two answers to that question. First, some teachers are just incompetent and pass everybody. The more likely answer, however, is that many administrators will fire a teacher that fails more than 20-25% of their students. That averages out to about 5-7 students per class. Most teachers have at least that many students in their lower level classes who do absolutely nothing. Many of those will fail unless they have a great deal of natural ability. However, the rest of the students will probably pass if the teacher wants to stay employed. Yes, it is sad.
With the new math that my son had in 4th and 5th grade, I am imagining more and more kids struggling with 7 times 9 in our district. Math was his favorite subject K-3, then his 4th grade class became the pilot school/grade level for new math before it was fully adopted in the district. He now hates math.

I am constantly finding ways to work on math with him whenever I can get the chance. When he gets older and has to fill out the ovals for his answers on the ACT/SAT, the only thing that matters are the correct answers.
 

All 'N' 011808

Former Walk-on
2 Year Member
Yes RR, you are correct. I am a little surprised that there seems to be such little hope for him to be declared eligible since he has another year to meet the qualifying standards. Either the stories are being exaggerated, or he has dug a very deep hole.

I am also a little amused that so many people think that an ACT/SAT tutor can turn things around. I have tutored dozens of students who are preparing for the exam, primarily for the Math portion of the test. When I first meet with a student, I always ask the same question: "What is 7 times 9?" You would be shocked at how many students I work with break out in a cold sweat and immediately start looking for a calculator. At that point, I tell the parent that we all are wasting our time on exam tutoring. I also say that I will work with the child. but I will have to go back to 3rd and 4th grade level math and work my way through Algebra II to get them ready for the exam. If they don't know basic multiplication facts, they probably are weak with fractions, percentages, basic Algebra, etc.

You might be thinking, "How can a student continue to be passed year after year without learning anything?' That's a fair question. As a former teacher and school administrator I can say that there are basically two answers to that question. First, some teachers are just incompetent and pass everybody. The more likely answer, however, is that many administrators will fire a teacher that fails more than 20-25% of their students. That averages out to about 5-7 students per class. Most teachers have at least that many students in their lower level classes who do absolutely nothing. Many of those will fail unless they have a great deal of natural ability. However, the rest of the students will probably pass if the teacher wants to stay employed. Yes, it is sad.
With the new math that my son had in 4th and 5th grade, I am imagining more and more kids struggling with 7 times 9 in our district. Math was his favorite subject K-3, then his 4th grade class became the pilot school/grade level for new math before it was fully adopted in the district. He now hates math.

I am constantly finding ways to work on math with him whenever I can get the chance. When he gets older and has to fill out the ovals for his answers on the ACT/SAT, the only thing that matters are the correct answers.
 

carrolltonsker

Husker Immortal
10 Year Member
With the new math that my son had in 4th and 5th grade, I am imagining more and more kids struggling with 7 times 9 in our district. Math was his favorite subject K-3, then his 4th grade class became the pilot school/grade level for new math before it was fully adopted in the district. He now hates math.

I am constantly finding ways to work on math with him whenever I can get the chance. When he gets older and has to fill out the ovals for his answers on the ACT/SAT, the only thing that matters are the correct answers.
Yep, these "new math" programs are another one of my pet peeves. I have worked with some elementary students, and even though I have a B.S. in Math, I wasn't sure what they were being asked to do. And many schools no longer use textbooks, so I was not able to read and figure it out myself. I usually end up saying, "Let me show you a much easier way of doing that."
 

All 'N' 011808

Former Walk-on
2 Year Member
Yep, these "new math" programs are another one of my pet peeves. I have worked with some elementary students, and even though I have a B.S. in Math, I wasn't sure what they were being asked to do. And many schools no longer use textbooks, so I was not able to read and figure it out myself. I usually end up saying, "Let me show you a much easier way of doing that."
Yep, his school had no math book AND no homework. I only saw how he was doing after an "exit ticket" was brought home at which point we would spend time going over the ones he got wrong so I knew he was understanding it.

Both of his teachers these past two years each said that they weren't always certain what they were asking their students to do. To me, that is a challenge that definitely needs to change.

The reality that Betts is in could become much more prevalent a few years down the road if the mathematics foundation for these kids isn't built first.
 
I am also a little amused that so many people think that an ACT/SAT tutor can turn things around. I have tutored dozens of students who are preparing for the exam, primarily for the Math portion of the test. When I first meet with a student, I always ask the same question: "What is 7 times 9?" You would be shocked at how many students I work with break out in a cold sweat and immediately start looking for a calculator. At that point, I tell the parent that we all are wasting our time on exam tutoring. I also say that I will work with the child. but I will have to go back to 3rd and 4th grade level math and work my way through Algebra II to get them ready for the exam. If they don't know basic multiplication facts, they probably are weak with fractions, percentages, basic Algebra, etc.
This is absolute truth! I'm not a math teacher, but I worked for the past two years as a math teacher as part of a special grant program. I had to be talked into the job because I assumed that I wouldn't be able to teach it; I was wrong. High school students with good grades could not add fractions, multiple or divide, or add/subtract 2-digit numbers. It was sickening to see that these kids had been repeatedly promoted without having to learn the most basic stuff, and it was even more sickening to realize that somehow their teachers had justified giving them good grades.

You might be thinking, "How can a student continue to be passed year after year without learning anything?' That's a fair question. As a former teacher and school administrator I can say that there are basically two answers to that question. First, some teachers are just incompetent and pass everybody. The more likely answer, however, is that many administrators will fire a teacher that fails more than 20-25% of their students. That averages out to about 5-7 students per class. Most teachers have at least that many students in their lower level classes who do absolutely nothing. Many of those will fail unless they have a great deal of natural ability. However, the rest of the students will probably pass if the teacher wants to stay employed. Yes, it is sad.
Bingo! There are very few stakeholders left in the educational system who actually care about learning. Test scores? Yes! Students' grades? Yes! Students passing? Absolutely! Well, put the emphasis on the wrong things, and you build up a system where there's immense pressure for every kid to pass, every kid who tries to get A's, and infinite levels of pre-planned blame-shifting for poor test scores, but very little emphasis or reward for learning. Unless the parents place an emphasis on learning over grades/promotion, the teachers will take the path of least resistance: pass everybody and give the kids who tried a good grade. Good teachers get fired, forced out, or burned out if they don't go along. The worse the school, the more likely that this culture takes over. It takes concerned, sharp, involved parents to keep track of what's going on with their kids' education, and that naturally happens in the healthier communities, and bad teachers are pushed out of those schools. Meanwhile, my last school literally bribed parents to come to parent-teacher conferences, and they still didn't come.
 
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