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Will we ever see another 400 hitter?

Discussion in 'Baseball' started by BornRed, Feb 11, 2018.

  1. Let it be by the code

    Let it be by the code My base D is 3 - 4 2 Year Member

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    Growing up in Nebraska in the 90's I was blessed to get 81 Braves games a season on TBS and became a huge Braves fan (still a pretty big fan). That team was a lot more than just starting pitching: Javy Lopez, Chipper Jones, David Justice, Fred McGriff, Ryan Klesko, plus some of my all time favorite lesser knowns like Mark Lemke and Jeff Blauser. Between the Huskers NC and the Braves winning the WS, 1995 was a great year and probably the peak of my sports fandom.
     
  2. Rainbow Dash

    Rainbow Dash It’s one thing to read about dragons... 2 Year Member

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    I think it will happen at some point. The game will have to evolve though before it does. This new swing-plane everyone is doing leads to more home runs...but it leads hitters into too many strikeouts to hit .400. I think eventually, with defensive shifts and such, hitters will go back to more fundamental swings.

    It takes the perfect storm. It takes the right player, on the right team, with the ability to hit oppo, and the ability to hit homer runs while not striking out. I think Bonds could have done it in 2002 with a stud behind him. He hit like .370 that year with pitchers essentially not pitching to him. He’s a power guy though. I don’t think it will be a pure power guy who does it.
     
  3. BasilLongfellow

    BasilLongfellow Mr. Nice Guy 5 Year Member

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    Strikeouts are gradually becoming more acceptable.

    The higher level you play at, the more strikeouts are accepted as the probability of errors decline. Outside of sacrifice situations, an out is an out. The type of out is irrelevant. You're out. And a strikeout is always better than a double play.

    With the new technology and teaching methods of swing planes and exit velocities off bats, the strikeout is an acceptable downside to homeruns.
     
  4. BasilLongfellow

    BasilLongfellow Mr. Nice Guy 5 Year Member

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    Also, they say you should be able to hit with power to the opposite field just as easily to the pull side.

    That's what they say.

    They are technically correct.

    But the number of guys that can do that is probably less than 10 in the world.

    So I think people that say that are jerks.
     
  5. Rainbow Dash

    Rainbow Dash It’s one thing to read about dragons... 2 Year Member

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    Haha exactly. I see so many hitters who can’t even put a soft grounder in play to the left side of the field with no defensive player even close to third base. Do they even work on it?
     
  6. BasilLongfellow

    BasilLongfellow Mr. Nice Guy 5 Year Member

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    I don't think so. And in a season of 162 games, slapping 5-10 hits to the opposite side to get a base hit can change your average like 10 points, which I would think would meet salary incentives.

    But nope. Grip and rip baby.
     
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  7. BasilLongfellow

    BasilLongfellow Mr. Nice Guy 5 Year Member

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    I'll add, when I was doing time in the Northern League, the veteran guys that had been either in the Show or close to it demanded the hitters work opposite field in bp. But that was the early 2000s, so who knows now.
     
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  8. Rainbow Dash

    Rainbow Dash It’s one thing to read about dragons... 2 Year Member

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    Maybe that will never change, I dunno. Remember growing up watching shortstops and 2nd basemen batting .250 with 5 homeruns? That was common place. Ozzie Smith played 19 seasons and had 28 career home runs and maybe averaged 35 RBI a season. There were 15 shortstops who hit 15 or more taters last year. Also, there were 15 second basemen who did it as well. Crazy!
     
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  9. Knight

    Knight Red Shirt 15 Year Member

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    What have been the top 10 highest season batting averages in the last 30 years? Anyone know where to look?
     
  10. Knight

    Knight Red Shirt 15 Year Member

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    I like baseball the way it is. It has evolved many times. 9 innings, over 3 hours. Who cares. Just let them play the game and enjoy it however you like. Casually, seriously, with friends, focused... whatever. THe game isn't going anywhere.
     
  11. BHELHusker

    BHELHusker Javik was correct! 10 Year Member

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    I remember watching Tony Gwynn when I was stationed in Hawaii and then in San Diego. He hit .394 in the shorted 1994 season. Hit over .300 every hear but his rookie year. Got to watch him play triple A ball in Hawaii in 1982 before his call up to the Padres. And then arrived in San Diego in 1984 time to watch them make to the World Series. He was a great player and better person.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2019
  12. IBwrong

    IBwrong Red Shirt 5 Year Member

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  13. IBwrong

    IBwrong Red Shirt 5 Year Member

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