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Thread: The worst argument against paying college football players:

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by MyBraska View Post
    Quite true. NU could afford it, as could some others, but it then would be truly the rich getting richer and the poor getting poorer. The recruiting advantage to the profitable schools would be off the charts.

    "A recent NCAA report done by professor Dan Fulks of Transylvania University in Kentucky shows that only 14 of the 120 FBS schools profited from campus athletics during the 2009 fiscal year." http://collegefootballtalk.nbcsports...ms-in-the-red/
    Maybe Alumni could step up and provide them with odd jobs or gifts
    I am Fred Lawrence Anderson and I approve this post.

  2. #17
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    Several years ago, I workrd as a financial aid advisor helping college bound students obtain scholarships, loans, and grants. These were for non atheletes so the cost of attendance (COA) was the target figure for all these students. The COA, which is provided by the institution, always included averages for out of pocket expenses, travel to and from campus, and misc. food and drug expenses, etc. These expenses are not included in atheletic scholarships which means there is a disparity among atheletes and the regular student body. It would not be unreasonable if athletes got some of these additional expenses covered along with their tuition, books, and room and board.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bamsker View Post
    Several years ago, I workrd as a financial aid advisor helping college bound students obtain scholarships, loans, and grants. These were for non atheletes so the cost of attendance (COA) was the target figure for all these students. The COA, which is provided by the institution, always included averages for out of pocket expenses, travel to and from campus, and misc. food and drug expenses, etc. These expenses are not included in atheletic scholarships which means there is a disparity among atheletes and the regular student body. It would not be unreasonable if athletes got some of these additional expenses covered along with their tuition, books, and room and board.
    Fair point. However, while they are in college aren't they covered under their parents medical insurance which would cover drug expense. If their parent(s) doesn't have insurance aren't they covered under medicade? Plus these athletes get the best food, trainers, tutors that the normal student would have to pay extra for.

    This debate could go on forever and there are valid arguments for both sides, I just don't think they should get a stipend.

  4. #19
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    They get paid

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoCalRed View Post
    I believe they already get such a stipend.
    scholarship money

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by joncarl View Post
    Fair point. However, while they are in college aren't they covered under their parents medical insurance which would cover drug expense. If their parent(s) doesn't have insurance aren't they covered under medicade? Plus these athletes get the best food, trainers, tutors that the normal student would have to pay extra for.

    This debate could go on forever and there are valid arguments for both sides, I just don't think they should get a stipend.
    This is actually over-the-counter drugs which are not covered under any health insurance plan.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bamsker View Post
    This is actually over-the-counter drugs which are not covered under any health insurance plan.
    Gotcha ya. Do you know if the Trainers are allowed to give things like cold med's or any over the counter meds? or is that beyond their scope?

  8. #23
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    Participation in college athletics is elective. Every student who participates, does so with the knowledge that by participating, they are going to have to "give" the University their time, effort and talent. Every athlete knows they are also putting their bodies at physical risk to participate. It is their decision. The very purpose of college, is to prepare the students for future careers. While in college, all athletes are encouraged to work towards their respective degrees. Those degrees don't include majors in "Pro Sports". Keep in mind for the purposes of this discussion, that many college athletes also do not have scholarships at all.

    So let's compare an athlete on a sports scholarship, and a student on an academic scholarship. It's been established earlier in this thread, that it costs somewhere between 29k and 32k annually as the cost of attending school. Are we seriously arguing that ANY student on a full scholarship needs to be paid more? In the case of the athletic scholarship, while many of the athletes are fine students, most don't come near the academic prowess of the academic scholarship student. Yet, they have the opportunity to attend college, receive a valuable college degree, with the overwhelming majority of their financial burden paid for. Most students who wish to attend college either have to "work" their way through, have rich parents, or go into massive debt to get that same degree.

    Most University athletic departments do not operate in the black. This was also pointed out earlier in this thread. What was the figure? 14 universities, Nebraska being one of them. Yet they offer intercollegiate sports because of demand, and the belief it can enrich the lives of the students participating. I agree that in the case of Football, the financial figures are mind numbing. College coaches are paid too much, etc. But I consider those issues irrelevant, at least when discussing the issue of compensation to the athletes who participate. It is an incredible gift to be able to attend college, with the bulk of your expenses paid.
    A very fair trade, to exchange athletic talent for a college degree. Without that opportunity, their options to attend would be the same as every other college student.

    Finally. The focus really should be on that degree. According to NCAA statistics only 1.7% of college football players will be good enough to go pro. Over a 4-5 year college career, these kids are paid the equivalent of 120-150K not to play pro sports. But to become Bankers, Lawyers, Farmers, etc. A hell of a gift. We shouldn't look the gift horse in the mouth.

    http://www.beyondusports.com/college-athletes-pro/

  9. #24
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    Im on the fence about if they should get paid or not. For the amount of money these kids make the universities, they should be able to get maybe a small stipend in return. On the other hand, between the training table, school cafeteria etc, theres ample places to get food if thats the real concern. Half the fun in college was seeing how far you could make 20 dollars go. I can tell you whenever the gas stations had Mickey's 40's for 1$, we always had enough spare change for a great weekend. And I think I myself paid Keystones production costs for a year and I didnt get a stipend or anything from playing sports. I always had a small amount of money to cover my "fun".

  10. #25
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    First off, if any scholarship athlete spends a Sunday hungry, they are probably too stupid to be in college. I'm guessing that type of complaining comes from guys who are too lazy, too stubborn, or too big headed to go to the school's Union to eat. I'm sure their scholarship covers some sort of meal plan with the school.

    As far as paying athletes, you can't. Mostly out of logistics. You can't pay football players, but ignore baseball players. You also can't say that players in revenue generating sports get paid, because schools will cook their books to keep from having to pay the men's hockey team, should they just inch into the black. I've suggested in the past that players get paid, after receiving their degree, from the money generated from authentic appearal sales. Another avenue would be tapping into these monster TV deals. The B1G is due for a new TV deal in 2015 or 2016 right? What if Delaney said that a portion of what is sure to be a nearly 2-billion dollar deal goes to student-athlete stipends? I'm sure that would raise the B1G's recruting profile just a bit.

  11. #26
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    OK, lets take a look at this using a real world example. This comes from TAMU.
    Tuition $8506.00
    Room & Board 8450.00
    Books & Supplies 2379.00
    Travel 500.00
    Personal Expenses 2349.00
    Total $21081.00

    The last figure isthe University's Cost Of Attendance. Typically, this is what the total amount of financial aid a student is entitled to, less the family's expected contribution which is dependent on income. A full ride scholarship to TAMU is for $21081.00. An atheletic scholarship is for Tuition, room and board, and books; or, $18232 as mandated by the NCAA. The amount the athlete recieves does not include the $2849.00 for travel and personal expenses. For an average school year, the differential between a "full ride" student and an athlete is a little over $200.00 per month.

    When I talk about equalizing the scholarships, I am not talking a great deal of money. The amount breaks down to about $50.00 per week. Someone earlier in the thread said the NU had 212 scholarship athletes. While the expense would be small compared to the overal budget, the amount required would be significant, in excess of $600000.00 per year for NU. Schools that are losing mony on athletics would find this amount a significant hurdle; yet, I still believe fair is fair. If a school allows the personal expenses for regular students, they shoud offer it to the athletes as well.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Burruss View Post
    Yes, football players get all sorts of benefits (free college, tutors, training table, apparel, etc) but when you stop to consider how much money is made from their year-round efforts, I have a tough time seeing any reason why they shouldn't get a little spending money so they can afford to be college kids in their very limited free time.

    I'm not as convinced that non-revenue athletes should get the stipend, but I understand why they will.
    The same logic could be applied to Walmart employees.

  13. #28
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    Tom Osborne has argued for many years that players should receive money for living expenses. That's good enough for me.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Voice Of Reason View Post
    Tom Osborne has argued for many years that players should receive money for living expenses. That's good enough for me.
    Living expenses in Lincoln are a lot different than living expenses in Miami. Living expenses for a women's golf player are probably going to be different than living expenses for a 300lb offensive lineman.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Porkchopexpress View Post
    Living expenses in Lincoln are a lot different than living expenses in Miami. Living expenses for a women's golf player are probably going to be different than living expenses for a 300lb offensive lineman.
    Living expenses are determined by the University's COA.. The COA is a mandated function of each institution's finacial aid department per federal regulations; so, expenses must be equal for all students.








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